New Project Questions

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#21
Signal Charlie is right. If you remove all the screws at once, the backing blocks may well fall into the hull, and then, you are, well, screwed! I’d be very concerned about this happening ina bit of this age.

Not sure what happens if you unscrew the splashrail, but the above holds true for all the other hardware.
 
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signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#23
The coaming should have machine screws with rivnuts, no danger of them falling off but you might have to soak with penetrating oil.

Bow handle - wooden backer block
Halyard block - wooden backer block
Halyard cleat - wooden backer block
Bridle eyestraps - wooden backer blocks
Horizontal hinge plate - wooden backer block
Latch plate - wooden backer block

They are glued in and have a fiberglass strap across them also. But everything dries up and/or rots over time. We have done so many boats now that when we hear a ratlle inside as the boat is turned over, we can identify which block it is :)

Jack wet rotten backer block.JPG

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IMG_2559.jpg

Hoops dry backer block.jpg
 

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#26
Wow, that boat cleaned up really nicely, looking forward to seeing more. Saw three Lasers at the "used stuff" section of the landfill this morning. Two of them had daggerboard, rudder and mast pieces. Sure got me thinking but I have too many projects already. Have you tried CLR for the stains? Worked really well on some rust stains at our old place in Wisconsin last summer. Your boat looks really good Crimson Dawn!
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#28
Iron Out spray, found at Lowes. Don't breathe it. And avoid the powder version, it is dusty and hard to mix. Then you might want to try wet sanding a spot with 1600 grit.

IMG_2448.jpg

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LADY scrubbed up real nice, check out her blog

Lady stern.jpg

Lady starboard.jpg

3M Adhesive Remover would work on the decal remnants, then a little more wet sanding. You'll have shadow of the digits there for a while where the vinyl protected the gelcoat, it will fade eventually.
 
Thread starter #29
Iron Out spray, found at Lowes. Don't breathe it. And avoid the powder version, it is dusty and hard to mix. Then you might want to try wet sanding a spot with 1600 grit.

View attachment 32331

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LADY scrubbed up real nice, check out her blog

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3M Adhesive Remover would work on the decal remnants, then a little more wet sanding. You'll have shadow of the digits there for a while where the vinyl protected the gelcoat, it will fade eventually.
I love that sail
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#30
Beldar, you are correct about a lot of expanding foam being back there, Howie told me that the early 70s is when they got a foam gun at the factory, so foam went everywhere! But we can reach the rudder or cockpit, just have to dig a while through a small hole....or pop the seam. The white blocks are the structural foam blocks that provide structural support and flotation, made of extruded polystyrene (XPS) closed cell foam vs the easier to find expanded polystyrene foam (EPS). XPS is hard to find, so folks out there, hold on to it, dry it out if needed.

hoops stern foam blob.jpg

hoops foam.jpg

Tips for working inside the boat through a new inspection port hole, 1) don't put the ring in until after the work is done, more room to reach 2) 5 inch port hard to work through, 6 inch best, 4 inch near impossible 3) tape the edge of the hole with blue tape to reduce sharp edges and fibers, remove tape before installing port and 4) wear long sleeves reaching through the port.

Here's a shot showing where the white blocks are located, look for the dew on the deck. 3 blocks forward, one just behind the bow handle. 3 blocks aft, one behind and under cockpit cubby.

Sunfish foam block location.jpg
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#33
Breeze Bender you are right about the 5 inch ports being better for the stern, given the crown of the deck back aft. It is important to not tighten the ring too tight, we add extra sealant around the port and starboard edges, build the sealant up a bit, vs cranking the ring all the way down to the deck and warping it. We tape around the port to reduce wayward blobs of sealant finding their way onto the deck, and lately we make sure all painting is done before grabbing the goo, it is hard to clean off and paint beads on it.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#34
60th Anniversary sail, hard to find.
Some photo-enhancement to show the locations of the Styrofoam blocks—seen with Signal Charlie's morning dew:

Fullscreen capture 6132019 101707 AM.bmp.jpg

In case it's not clear yet, removing the hardware can cause the factory's block of wood ("backing-block") to fall inside the hull. (and become lost—And the reason to leave at least one screw in all the time). The hardware can be removed with the hull upside-down. Oftentimes, physically moving the hardware one-half-inch will hide the old holes, and pull the screw into a stronger part of the original "backing-block". Suggest using longer screws as replacements. When replacing "backing blocks", suggest sawing oval portions of white plastic cutting blocks—found in kitchens or at Dollar Tree. ("Where everything is not a dollar" any longer!) :eek:

:oops: Get those $1 ear protectors, $1 eye protectors, $1 disposable 100 gloves, $1 Barilla 1# spaghetti, $1 Dutch mushrooms, $1 Clorox, $1 travel items—NOW! :(

I’d like to remove the hardware to make it easier to restore her or is that a bad idea.
This is the start of the sailing season :) "if'n you get my drift...;)

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#36
I like Signal Charlie's explanations, they are usually accompanied by good concise photos, LOL. And OP, your boat looks very nice since you've cleaned her up, it's always easier to stay on top of the routine maintenance once you've brought the boat up to speed, aye? Good job, she'll soon look beautiful once those ugly stains are removed. If all else fails, you could try polishing compound or even rubbing compound, though I would save the latter as a last resort... or (gasp!) PAINT the cockpit if all else fails. Dunno how deep the stains run, but if they are merely surface stains you should have no problem getting rid of 'em, same way you'd drop-kick unwanted house guests from your property like you're STARRIN' in the NFL, LOL. :rolleyes:
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#37
Uh oh! I knew Dollar General was not a buck for everything, but how long has Dollar Tree been that way?
'Since the first day I walked in. :cool: Four years ago (?) maybe much longer? :confused:

$1 is an easy number for comparative-pricing. Oh...and I forgot to mention their $1 Vise-Gripsone of which I've already modified—using a grinder for a special application. (Decent quality, cheaper, and more versatile than clamps).

Great old sail—I've got one, too—made in Hong Kong. :rolleyes:

I was removing some old deck stains yesterday, and used the only cleaner I had handy—"Dutch Cleanser". (Probably unknown in Holland :rolleyes: ). Combined with a green scouring sponge, which took off some unseen overspray, the cleaning went well. :)

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