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Scorpion sailboat

Speaking of drains. I hosed the boat down and noticed that the tub holds water well.

View attachment 45739

Is this correct behavior when the boat is sitting in the yard or do I need to fix or replace the Bailer system?

Henny
On my scorpion, the drain did not seem to unscrew. I was able to turn it back and forth until it popped out a bit. Once I did that the water ran right through the bailer onto my other boat below.
 

HennyG

New Member
On my scorpion, the drain did not seem to unscrew. I was able to turn it back and forth until it popped out a bit. Once I did that the water ran right through the bailer onto my other boat below.
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On my scorpion, the drain did not seem to unscrew. I was able to turn it back and forth until it popped out a bit. Once I did that the water ran right through the bailer onto my other boat below.
I will try to work it. I can get it to turn and go up and down a little bit, however the water does not come out at all. Makes for I nice little tub.
 
I will try to work it. I can get it to turn and go up and down a little bit, however the water does not come out at all. Makes for I nice little tub.
The ball may be stuck. See if you can dig around in through the opening in the bottom of the hull.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
I will try to work it. I can get it to turn and go up and down a little bit, however the water does not come out at all. Makes for I nice little tub.
Is this bailer made of metal? The later metal models have the center pull up to drain. The center can also be removed entirely. Try that...

I'd flush with gentle garden-hose pressure in both directions--keeping in mind that a slow-draining bailer "trumps" having to rebuild one! ;)
 

HennyG

New Member
Is this bailer made of metal? The later metal models have the center pull up to drain. The center can also be removed entirely. Try that...

I'd flush with gentle garden-hose pressure in both directions--keeping in mind that a slow-draining bailer "trumps" having to rebuild one! ;)
It is a metal drainer. I will try to pull it up since turning it counter clockwise didn't seem to have a effect. With it closed I can't really probe it from the top but I can try from underneath.

If it is functioning, is it supposed to drain at all in the down position, or only when it is popped up?
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Draining (or "bailing") is accomplished by pulling the aluminum knob upwards about one inch. More pulling will remove it for maintenance or operating at "full-drain". It shouldn't drip when snapped shut. It could need replacement seals, which may need to be "matched-up" at a good hardware store.

Those metal Sunfish bailers are all 40+ years old, long discontinued, and every aluminum fitting is subject to corrosion--worse in salt water--or even near salt water! :confused:

The "freeze-plug" solution is "uncool" :rolleyes: but works every time and, if lost to misadventure, its replacement costs less than $6. :cool:
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Newer models of metal De Persia bailers are of the pop-up type. Unscrew or pull up to drain. If stuck, great patience must be endured, along with multiple treatments of PB Blaster, Kroll, Marvel Mystery Oil, CRC products, or Rust-Bust. ,
On my list of desirable anti-corrosives, I'd misspelled Kroil. :oops:

Broke out the pressure washer today. A long-term project of loosening a huge, but frozen, adjustable wrench got a zap from the pressure washer. Some unfamiliar glop came out. :(

I think this may be a valuable part in thawing frozen De Persia bailers, too. :) Alternate anti-corrosives in between shots.

Give it a try. :cool:
 

HennyG

New Member
So after a soak with the PB buster, several counterclockwise turns and some pulling, the plug came up to the draining position! It is a pretty small drain and I never saw the ball, but it did drain out some water from the cockpit. I never took it completely out so I didn't get a chance to look at the seal. It seems to pop back in, and if I turn it clockwise it stays put. I am assuming that is the correct function.

Now that I have it opening, I plan to close it up again and fill the cockpit with water and see if it holds. If that goes well I am going to put it in the water and see if it floats. I am sure I have a leak near the daggerboard and maybe a few others between the deck and the hull, but now I have a working drain and a bailer and I may actually be able to sail this thing.
 

HennyG

New Member
You might want to do the air test before checking to see if it floats.
I will do an air test before putting it in the water.

I know I am going to find some leaks on the seam with the deck and near the daggerboard because when rolling the boat water came out.

Can I use something like 3M Marine Adhesive Sealant Fast Cure 4200
to fix the leaks or will I need something more substantial?

There are no holes that I can see but likely several small leaks.
 
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po-man sailor

Active Member
If I were never going to pull it apart again I would use thixo or west 610 but if there is a possibility go with something like 4200 or 5200 in some cases.
 

HennyG

New Member
Leak test today. Well not a big surprise. Four leaks. Two at the junction between the hull and the deck. One at the daggerboard opening and one on the hardware connecting the bow handle.

1621223798650.png

1621223823035.pngthe forum is flipping the pictures sorry

1621223945807.png

1621223981978.png

To fix it I know I am going to have to pull off the rivets and the trim.

My question is, if it floats (I am guessing that it will) is there anything wrong with me sailing it this summer and then dealing with the leaks over the winter?
 

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L&VW

Well-Known Member
Can the leak at the daggerboard trunk be better described? Top or bottom? Somewhere in between? Of the four leaks, that's your most serious leak point. In season, an hour using THIXO can be time well spent. Dry first, in the sun.

Sailing takes precedence, but check on the amount of water that comes out of the drain after a sail. Something between a cup and a quart points to a needed look-see.

You've got all winter to investigate perplexing leaks. Funny how all the work is always done in June!
 
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HennyG

New Member
Can the leak at the daggerboard trunk be better described? Top or bottom? Somewhere in between? Of the four leaks, that's your most serious leak point. In season, an hour using THIXO can be time well spent. Dry first, in the sun.

Sailing takes precedence, but check on the amount of water that comes out of the drain after a sail. Something between a cup and a quart points to a needed look-see.

You've got all winter to investigate perplexing leaks. Funny how all the work is always done in June!
Daggerboard trunk leak is under the rim that is on the top aft. I am pretty sure it on the port side. Couldn't see a hole, only bubbles. I think the daggerboard repair will end up being blind, but it pretty high up.
 
Just made the inner patch for my transom. Funny we are working scorpions that are the same blue color. Might get a bit confusing. Anyway what are are looking at is 4 layers of fiberglass and then the aluminum block with 4 layers of fiberglass over the top. I put the bolts into the block and then spread the fiberglass around the bolts and then wetted the fiberglass. I will follow up with a video at some point.
 

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HennyG

New Member
A little update for the board.
I took my sail out and find about a dozen tears as well as a few holes, with the largest about an inch in diameter. I patched those up with sail tape. I then found that the mainsheet needed replacement so I swapped it out.

I dropped it in the water and

1623071616266.png

It floats.

It was a very windy day and my son had a lot of trouble tacking. Couldn't get very close to the wind. I don't know if that is his sailing or my rigging.

Nearly a third of the plastic rings holding the sale to the boom are missing and I will order new ones.

Very difficult to get the daggerboard up and down.

And I know the leaks will still have to be dealt with but for now I am very happy. Stayed on top of the lake the whole afternoon and got back to dock in one piece.
 

po-man sailor

Active Member
You can temp tie the sail to the boom with small cord like para.
I can't tell but pic looks like he is about to tackle or really close to the wind. The sail is not really fully foiled.
My fave color combo on a scorpion.
 

Sailflow

Active Member
Looks nice on the water.
When you raise the sail the upper boom needs to be tight to the mast. Also measure from the front if the boom not including the end cap to the gooseneck set gooseneck at 16.. Put a tell tale on. It can be cassette tape tied to one of the lower boom clips. Upwind the tell tale should be 45 degrees of the boom. Tacking takes practice and stronger winds are harder, need good forward speed.
 

HennyG

New Member
Looks nice on the water.
When you raise the sail the upper boom needs to be tight to the mast. Also measure from the front if the boom not including the end cap to the gooseneck set gooseneck at 16.. Put a tell tale on. It can be cassette tape tied to one of the lower boom clips. Upwind the tell tale should be 45 degrees of the boom. Tacking takes practice and stronger winds are harder, need good forward speed.
Thanks for the video. I will share it with him and work on getting the upper boom higher. I didn't understand your comment about the distance from the gooseneck to the front of the boom?

I think he also didn't get any speed before his tack. He slowed down and luffed the sail, then tried to force a tack which didn't really work. Will try again next weekend if the weather cooperates.
 
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