New member looking for some advice on a project Sailfish

Thread starter #1
Hello everyone,

I am new to the forum and new to boat repair in general.
I recently picked up a 70's Sailfish project locally for $70, it needs some work before it sails. I am currently working on putting inspection ports in,and was wondering if anyone could tell me a good spot for one on the rear end of the boat,where i wont end up hitting the foam on the inside.

Thanks
 
Thread starter #2
Also, as i was just working on the boat, sealing screw holes. I now need access to the backing blocks for the traveler cable..
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#3
This is a Sailfish, right? (Not a Sunfish)?

Some like leaving the deck alone, instead cutting holes in the bottom directly below the hardware. This makes sense, as repairs generally strengthen the area cut--are out of sight--and a good start for a beginning fiberglasser. :)
 
Thread starter #4
This is a Sailfish, right? (Not a Sunfish)?

Some like leaving the deck alone, instead cutting holes in the bottom directly below the hardware. This makes sense, as repairs generally strengthen the area cut--are out of sight--and a good start for a beginning fiberglasser. :)
Yes this is a Sailfish. The main idea for the inspection ports on my boat are for drying it out. It had been sitting full of water for who knows how long before i got it. Anyway, i got one port installed up front, just tried reinstalling the side rails (?) and three of the four screw backing block holes are stripped out.. So now i have to get in there and replace the wood somehow.
 
Thread starter #6
This should help Sailfish inspection port location

The search function can help you find useful threads to help, and pls post your questions.
Awesome, thanks for that link.

I managed to use wood glue and some filler pieces in the stripped holes and it seems to be holding quite well.

I will see what happens in the future, but right now i just want to get it on the water.. I'm thinking I will fix everything over the winter and maybe put some paint on it as well.

I'm going to try to get a picture of what I got done today.
 
Thread starter #7
Alright, today i put in one inspection port, epoxied splits on both deck seams, sealed up all of the screw holes, messed around with some green marine paint (I think it looks decent) and put about 5 coats of weatherproofing stain on the side rails, along with new screws.

These things are supposed to weigh like 85lbs, Right? I haven't weighed it yet but my guess is it's closer to 150 than 85..
Here it is, in my "work stand". IMAG0148.jpg IMAG0147.jpg
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#8
Alright, today i put in one inspection port, epoxied splits on both deck seams, sealed up all of the screw holes, messed around with some green marine paint (I think it looks decent) and put about 5 coats of weatherproofing stain on the side rails, along with new screws. These things are supposed to weigh like 85lbs, Right? I haven't weighed it yet but my guess is it's closer to 150 than 85..Here it is, in my "work stand".
Your "work stand" is what I've recommended in the past. I used "retired" fire hoses as support.

Better than a workbench, the advantage is being able to rotate the boat to the best possible angle—and in your case, height.

And speaking of height, the trees in your location reminded me of Holderness, NH, where I bought a terrific 1971 Sunfish last Autumn. Apparently, it had been moored its entire life, and appeared like-new as a result. I hated to see it go, but I got top dollar—plus, the new owner sent pictures the next day, with his kids all over it while sailing. (Times we tend to remember). :)

.
 
Thread starter #9
Alright guys, i have another question..

Did the older wooden Sailfish have a smaller daggarboard? The reason i ask is because the boat didn't come with one, so i found one on Ebay for a decent price in great condition. So i received the daggarboard today and went out to test fit it, and it seems to be too small for the slot in the hull, like 3/4" of room front and back, and the metal spring on the daggarboard doesn't hold it in at all.. What gives?

I know i can make it work, just thought i would ask before i go trying to make it fit correctly.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#11
Nice boat. The Super Sailfish MKII did have a smaller daggerboard because the hull is not as deep as the fiberglass Sunfish. We like upgrading to the spoon tip board or the Barrington.

She should weigh 98 pounds.

Specs Alcort Sailfish Sunfish.jpeg
 
Thread starter #12
Nice boat. The Super Sailfish MKII did have a smaller daggerboard because the hull is not as deep as the fiberglass Sunfish. We like upgrading to the spoon tip board or the Barrington.

She should weigh 98 pounds.

View attachment 32452
Interesting. So my boat should have the small one, correct? That's odd that it still seems too small then..

Here it is. Almost too nice for my old dirty boat! IMAG0151.jpg
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#13
Well when you say small, there are 73 years of daggerboard designs. The wooden Sailfish definitely had short 31 inch or so daggerboards. As far as trunk length fore and aft, we haven't come across too much variation. Some boards in later years were a little thick.

(L-R) Wooden Sunfish and Sailfish board, 1960s spoon tip for fiberglass Sunfish that may have been on the fiberglass Super Sailfish MKII as well, Shadow Board 1972-? then the Barrington Board.

IMG_3420.jpg

A 50-60 year old piece of wood can shrink in all dimensions, or may have been damaged, sanded, refinished etc...that may have removed material and changed dimensions over the years. Yours has definitely been taken apart and refinished as the older boards had standard slot screws.

All said, it's better than a board that is too thick and too long fore-aft :) You will find that you boat performs better with the longer boards.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#15
:rolleyes: I've got a few: The middle one below I think is the "Shadow" board.


P5270041-002.JPG Fullscreen capture 5102018 13148 AM.jpg
The blue one was given a thin fiberglass cloth coating by the previous owner, which (I think) took a hit, got wet inside, swelled-up and gradually peeled. Where the glass has peeled off, it looks a new board! :) I'm getting back to removing the rest some day! :rolleyes:

'No idea why those holes were drilled. :confused:

.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#18
Yes the middle one is the "Shadow" Of Its Former Self Board, a compromise when they brought the Minifish to market.

Pin holes to set the board a different heights for different points of sail?
 
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