New member looking for some advice on a project Sailfish

mixmkr

Active Member
#21
Someone may have thought sticking a "pin" thru the hole was the best idea, when yes..dimples work fine...or even a sharpie on a white daggerboard ...or whatever... letting the shockcord hold the daggerboard at whatever position is desired. For a bit, I had one board marked, so I knew it was fully retracted..mainly for coming into shore or minimum drag (filling the slot, without creating a void...but not sticking out an inch or two either).
 
Thread starter #22
One more question (for now), I am unsure how old the lines are on my Sailfish.. Would it be a good idea to replace the lines, or should they be fine? They look to be in good condition, but they could also be original.. If i need to replace them, how many feet of line should i get?

I was looking at the New England Ropes Buzz Line in 5/16", will this work for all the rigging on the boat?

Thanks
 
#23
If you intend to sail in rough seas & weather, any kind of serious breeze, and you're unsure of the strength & quality of your lines, then replace 'em... not all damage is visible to the naked eye, lines can age, rot internally, suffer UV or chemical damage, etc., and still look serviceable, when in reality they are ready to snap. And they'll snap at the worst possible time too, I guaran-f#%ng-tee it, LOL. New line isn't that expensive, it's worth the peace of mind, AYE? :rolleyes:

You can always use the old line for other purposes, so long as your life isn't depending upon it. I did the same thing with climbing ropes back in the day: any question, they were immediately replaced, and the old ropes used for other purposes such as tie-down line aboard a pickup truck. It just ain't worth it, running cr@ppy old lines aboard your boat, new lines all around will look better and give ya peace of mind. Just my $.02, FWIW, aye??? I'm off to the ol' hacienda to crack a cold beer, looks like I'm in with this new job so I'm a happy camper, LOL. :cool:
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#24
It depends on the lines. Older halyards are often cotton, which stretches so your sail gets lower at the day goes by. A very rough sheet can be tough on your hands - newer material is typically softer that what was often used back in the day. The sheet you have in mind sounds good - 28 or 29 feet should work. I'd get something with little stretch in the 3/16" or 1/4" inch range for the halyard. Thinner line works a bit better for the halyard.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#26
Post a picture of your line. If it is factory line, it might be in great shape. We routinely buy old Alcort sheets and use them for lots of things, like sheets, and boat hoists.
IMG_6115.jpg


ZSA ZSA hoist sideways.jpg

The Buzz line you mentioned is the right size for a sheet, we like to feel the line before we buy it to see if it will feel good on our hands and to make sure it will run free through the blocks. For a sheet we buy 25' feet of New England Rope Sta Set, 5/16th inch diameter. A few more feet wouldn't hurt, you want to make sure that the sail can blow all the way forward with the sheet loose and a Figure 8 on the end, otherwise you could watch your boat sail away.

For the halyard we also buy Sta Set, 25 feet. And we buy another 25 feet for extra to make a 36 inch or so line bridle, 12 foot bow line and multiple sail ties.

CHIP will have vintage line that we bought on ebay.

IMG_0329.jpg

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Thread starter #27
Post a picture of your line. If it is factory line, it might be in great shape. We routinely buy old Alcort sheets and use them for lots of things, like sheets, and boat hoists.
View attachment 32527


View attachment 32526

The Buzz line you mentioned is the right size for a sheet, we like to feel the line before we buy it to see if it will feel good on our hands and to make sure it will run free through the blocks. For a sheet we buy 25' feet of New England Rope Sta Set, 5/16th inch diameter. A few more feet wouldn't hurt, you want to make sure that the sail can blow all the way forward with the sheet loose and a Figure 8 on the end, otherwise you could watch your boat sail away.

For the halyard we also buy Sta Set, 25 feet. And we buy another 25 feet for extra to make a 36 inch or so line bridle, 12 foot bow line and multiple sail ties.

CHIP will have vintage line that we bought on ebay.

View attachment 32528

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Sta Set was my other choice. I might just use that for everything to keep all the same rope.

This is the line on my sail, it looks to be in good condition although there is some small fraying in some spots..
 

Attachments

Thread starter #30
Alright, i have been doing some leak testing and can't seem to find any obvious leaks, but it still won't hold air pressure for more than ~2 minutes. I'm thinking it will be fine for now, just as long as it's not filling with water when i put it in the lake..

In other news, I ended up ordering new line from APS cause I wanted to get a mast cleat anyway and figured, may as well get the order up to $50 for free shipping..
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#31
Well the Sunfish has over 30 designed holes in it, plus a vent hole, and over 30 feet of seam. There are a lot of places for air to escape, no problem as long as it does so above the waterline :)
 
Thread starter #34
Update

Just put the new Sta-Set lines and mast cleat on from APS, i think i should have gone with the 1/4" instead of 5/16" but it will work. The boat is still pooling water in the hull every morning when i check it.. The foam in there must hold A LOT of water. Probably still weighs ~150lbs, definitely a two person job to get it on the trailer..

Anyway, heading up to the lake on the 4th to test her out, can't wait :D. IMAG0156.jpg Hope it floats and doesn't leak :oops:
 
#35
Did you check the mast hole for the leak? Fill it with water and watch- if water drains into the hull you’ve found a leak. Yes, the foam can hold a lot of water weight. Hope the maiden voyage goes well- keep us posted!
 
Thread starter #36
Did you check the mast hole for the leak? Fill it with water and watch- if water drains into the hull you’ve found a leak. Yes, the foam can hold a lot of water weight. Hope the maiden voyage goes well- keep us posted!
Yes, i did check it for leaks. It seemed to leak right at the top where the tube meets the deck. I epoxied the crap out of it and sanded it smooth, so there should be no issues with that anymore..
 
#38
FishFlyer, I’ve got a similar wooden Sailfish in my garage. You’re inspiring me to pull it out and freshen it up. The green and white sail is my favorite color combo, too. The early Sailfish sail may have been 65 sf? Not positive on that- but the Sunfish sail definitely works at 75 sf and will give you a faster, wetter ride!
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#39
1. If you still want to do an inspection port aft, put it just forward of the rudder assembly horizontal hinge plate. The Super Sailfish MKII deck is a little flatter than the Sunfish deck so a 5 inch port will work, good access if the wooden backer blocks ever need replacing on the rudder assembly or bridle eyestraps.

2. I was surprised to learn, Alan told me, that those pontoon hulls can make water during the day. If the foam is wet and the hull heats up, that water can and will come out of the 2 kinds of foam that are in there. Warm dry air and circulation will help dry out wet blocks over time, most likely the extra weight in your boat is in the expanding foam that holds the flotation blocks in place. We had this posted months ago from someone wanting to get rid of wet foam and do something else with the hull, never heard if the owner of this boat finished the project or not. There are several ways to dry the boat out without cutting the deck off.

Sailfish foam blocks copy.jpeg

BreezeB, get that wooden Sailfish fixed up! The Standard Sailfish was 11'7" and had a 65 sf sail and shorter spars. The wooden Super Sailfish and fiberglass Super Sailfish MKII were 13'7" and had the same sizes spars and sail as the Sunfish, 75 sf. Fishflyer's boat is the fiberglass MKII, one way to tell the longer Super Sailfish boats is the handrail, the Supers have 3 loops whereas the Standard has 2 loops.

Here's a 65 sf Standard Sailfish sail laying over a 75 sf Super Sailfish sail. On another note, the Minifish sail is also 65 sf, the Catfish bermuda rig is 105 sf.

IMG_0513.jpg
 
Thread starter #40
Maiden voyage update..

She floats! Unfortunately there was absolutely no wind yesterday at camp.. It sits fairly high in the water, but right side low.

I was noticing a small amount of water that got in the hull after about 3 hours in the water, then I thought the wind was going to pick up, so I rigged the boat and paddled out of the cove only to find, still, absolutely no wind.. On my way paddling back to the dock I noticed the rudder felt a little bit loose. Closer inspection reveled my rudder mounting plate was slowly pulling out of the hull with every rudder movement..

So I guess I'm going to install another inspection port on the back of the boat and try to replace the blocks back there.
 
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