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Harbor Freight Sunfish Trailer

Alan Glos

Active Member
Next spring I was thinking about buying a Harbor Freight utility trailer frame and using it for a Sunfish trailer. I was at the Syracuse, NY HF store yesterday and saw one assembled, and was fairly impressed with how sturdy and well made they are. I also like the 12" wheels that come stock with the kits.

Question: I assume that you need to retrofit a longer trailer tongue to make a Sunfish sit on it properly. Has anybody out there done such a retrofit and if so, how did it work? Also, any general reviews on how the HF trailers hold up and ride?

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
 

Webfoot

New Member
The tongue is fine as-is, trailer is for a 12'-14' boat. I got the 8" wheels, 12" wheels would help reduce the bounce. Anyway, the trailer is sort of a add you own hardware kit as in add a winch, better safety chains etc. Mine works fine but if I were to sell one of my trailers it would be the HF, I'd keep the one with the shocks and coil springs I got used for $150 bones.

One mod needed to carry a SF. Get rid of the roller that comes as a bow snubber and use a rubber V-Block. And a couple of Eye-Bolts replacing the fender bolts to fasten a strap over the hull.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
. . . you might also consider moving the bunks out where they carry the hull closer to a point where its strongest, less flexible, and least susceptible to fatigue..., and shift the whole carrying load a little forward.

A "V" bunk near the bow, in combination with longer, wider main bunks might also help distribute the weight over a broader area.

. . . or use the gate-side utility model trailer. Remove the gate-sides, drop in your bunk frame, and slide on the boat. I used that method for a few years..., kept the boat hoisted to the garage ceiling when it wasn't being used.
 

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This is how I modified the trailer for my sunfish. I used 2x12's with the contour of the bottom of the hull cut into the top. My neighbor had just recarpeted so I got to go nuts padding it up :).
 

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SmoothSailing

Pirateer, Sunfish & Sailfish Owner
Very interesting, Sailandsurf_89. I'd always wondered how those incredibly inexpensive, new HF trailers would hold up. Apparently they don't.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
I'm not surprised at the criticism. :rolleyes: You don't have to Google very far to find descriptions like "crap" for Chinese-made steel. :(

I first noticed it many years ago when I was using coat hangers for oxy-acetylene welding. The old ones were American-made and worked fine for welding, but there's so many impurities in the new foreign-made coat hangers, you really have to buy dedicated welding materials. :oops: When it comes to tools, most new tools are made in China, including Snap-on, Stanley, Husky and Craftsman. You're better off buying used American-made tools.

That said, I don't know where American trailers get their steel. A neighbor gave me a Continental trailer, about six years old—routinely immersed in salt water. The ocean had rusted it badly, and he couldn't trust it—although it was galvanized from the factory. I sold it to a boater who needed to move his boat from the water to his back yard—a distance of about 300 feet! (A good use of that trailer, I'd say... :) ).

Since I car-top, I probably shouldn't be offering trailer advice; however, I believe it is better to really cinch-down the Sunfish to the padded bunks. While traveling, a loose Sunfish can head south, while the trailer bunks are heading north. The hammer-effect would shake the structural foam loose, and not do the trailer any good. :confused:

Has anyone tried using no bunks at all on the trailer, by instead using a sling, trampoline- or net- material?
 
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CW Spook

New Member
...Has anyone tried using no bunks at all on the trailer, by instead using a sling, trampoline- or net- material?
Along that line, has anyone used the Right On trailer that holds the Sunfish on its dolly? I've been thinking that might be a nice way to go.
 
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DavidF

New Member
Up
Here is web site that is dedicated to just that, and they even use a harbor freight trailer. Also of note is that harbor Freight sells a boat trailer, but with 8" wheels for 320. I have heard that it does not require any mods to carry a sunfish.
http://www.sunfishclass.org/frequent/SchwobelsCradle.htm

Here is a link to that trailer.
Harbor Freight Tools – Quality Tools at Discount Prices Since 1977
That link to the Corpus Christi Sailing Center "Guidelines for Building a Cradle for a Sunfish Sailboat on a Trailer" seems broken, as well as the link to the same place on the Sunfish FAQ page, but you can still find the info in the Internet Archive's wayback machine:

Guidelines for Building a Cradle for a Sunfish Sailboat on a Trailer
 

lckeffer

New Member
I have a harbor trailer with many thousands of miles on it. I have used it for hauling many different things over the years. It has motorcycle racks on it and a storage box in the front from tractor supply. I recently needed a spare trailer for my boats so I built a set of bunks from 1x6s and 2x4s. These attach to the stake bed slots. It now carries my laser upside down. This trailer has served me well. It's been to both coasts several times. It's gone so far it now needs new tires (12 inch). It sits outside in the weather year around. Every now and then I slap some more rustolem paint on it.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
At least one tire company has recommended storing tires off the ground. Tire tread seldom has a chance to "wear-through". Trailer tires fail in the sidewall: most often, the side that gets the sun.

Since most of our trailers rarely see the daily use--which is good for the rubber in ALL tires--when the sailing season ends, put two supports under the axle.

If your trailer has tires of 13-inch size or greater, look through the used tire racks. Oftentimes, newish automobile tires are replaced for comfort or noise issues. Auto tires are made to much higher standards than tires marked "Trailer", will last longer, and save money--starting at purchase. Ironically, foreign-made tires are better than many cheaper US brands--like "Cooper". (Which are produced in the same crappy factories).

Check the country of origin. (I don't have any experience with the better Chinese tires).

 

Seaotter5

Member
My kayak trailer is great for transporting my two sailboats, but at times, as I grow older, it would be nice to have something that would make launching a bit easier, so I had planned on getting a Harbor Freight trailer. While researching the matter, I discovered that PennDot considers kit trailers to be homemade, and therefore require expensive inspections and up to 6 months to be approved. Not really a viable option for me. Unfortunately, as their boat trailer looks like it would fit my needs quite well.
 

Weston

Member
Here is web site that is dedicated to just that, and they even use a harbor freight trailer. Also of note is that harbor Freight sells a boat trailer, but with 8" wheels for 320. I have heard that it does not require any mods to carry a sunfish.
http://www.sunfishclass.org/frequent/SchwobelsCradle.htm

Here is a link to that trailer.
Harbor Freight Tools – Quality Tools at Discount Prices Since 1977
that link didn’t work for me. It simply takes me to the harbor freight homepage. I searched on trailers and wondered if this is the one you are recommending:1195 lb. Capacity 48 in. x 96 in. Heavy Duty Folding Trailer
 

Weston

Member
At least one tire company has recommended storing tires off the ground. Tire tread seldom has a chance to "wear-through". Trailer tires fail in the sidewall: most often, the side that gets the sun.

Since most of our trailers rarely see the daily use--which is good for the rubber in ALL tires--when the sailing season ends, put two supports under the axle.
I’ve read that UV light quickly damages trailer tires, as well. For that reason I bought some cheap tire covers made of reflective cloth that I put on the tires when not using the trailer. I thought they would wear out pretty quickly, but I have a set that is two years old that look as good as new.
 

lckeffer

New Member
I have a harbor trailer with many thousands of miles on it. I have used it for hauling many different things over the years. It has motorcycle racks on it and a storage box in the front from tractor supply. I recently needed a spare trailer for my boats so I built a set of bunks from 1x6s and 2x4s. These attach to the stake bed slots. It now carries my laser upside down. This trailer has served me well. It's been to both coasts several times. It's gone so far it now needs new tires (12 inch). It sits outside in the weather year around. Every now and then I slap some more rustolem paint on it.
Here are some pics of my multi use harbor freight trailer.IMG_20200801_184259.jpgIMG_20200801_184241.jpg
 
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