Water in mast

Thread starter #1
I have finally gotten out on the water and it has been a fun as I remember it to be.

I have noticed that every time I pull the mast out of the sail, water comes out to the lower section of the mast. I have kept the boat pointy side up so the mast has not been in the water. Any idea where this water is coming from?
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#2
If the conditions are such that any waves wash over the deck, the mast step gets filled, and as the lower mast bottom plug has a draining hole (it's not supposed to be watertight), you sail with the mast foot filled with water up to the deck level. As impractical as it sounds, it's normal and happens on every Laser. Don't worry.

_
 

thieuster

Active Member
#4
... adding to that: empty the mast step (water out) every time. Difficult to do when you're alone. This fuel transfer pump works great in that case.

 
Thread starter #7
Thanks

I don't remember this issue from when I used to sail the boat, but obviously it is part of sailing it. It makes sense that water would get down into the mast step.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#10
This works, too.
Besides being a little rough on the hull :rolleyes: , that drains just what's between the mast and the step (in any reasonable time). To empty the mast itself, you need to take the mast out, keep it vertical for a moment (I let the foot rest on the gunwale) and let the drain hole do what it's supposed to. If you're taking the sections apart anyway, then of course the water comes out from the other end.

_
 

Eyeper

Active Member
#11
Arrrrgghhh!!! Not my boat. Unless that's a terry cloth shore line.
Yes, I apologize for any cringing this boat treatment might cause to careful boat owners. In my defense, I have to say I never treat my vehicles or other possessions so roughly, but this type of beach is about all I get for good sailing. (I had had two different dollies, but they are another bother to haul around and use). In 1981 someone in Ireland built this hull like a brick shithouse. I went in and beefed up the mast step, centerboard trunk, and through- IMG_5451.JPG IMG_5450.JPG bolted all the deck fittings when the boat was new. I have never had a hull-deck joint issue and no soft spots. I DO NOT race, and this boat has been sailed hard and put away wet. Of course there have been several broken spars in 35 years, but no hull problems. There's so much gelcoat scratched off the bottom of the hull that you can see light through the deck inspection ports. But there's still plenty of 'glass there. If I ever get a brand new boat I'd change my ways.....
 

thieuster

Active Member
#12
Watch collectors would call this 'Wabi': The Perfection of Imperfection. I love that 'crash test dummy'-sticker on the hull! Apart from that: this boat goes well with the LandCruiser in the back! Yours? My son's dream combo: an old LC + RIB and boat, trotting along on European roads.
 

AlanD

Former ISAF Laser Measurer
#15
A sponge taped to the end of an old batten does the same trick if you're really want to be pedantic. Personally I just use the bottom section to absorb the water and pull it out that way, alternatively if you tie you boat on to the trolley, you can just turn th e boat onto it's side without the boat touching the ground (not an issue with the Australian style A frame trolleys with gunnel supports but I could see it not working with the T design trolleys particularly if the hull sits on the trolley).
 

Eyeper

Active Member
#16
Watch collectors would call this 'Wabi': The Perfection of Imperfection. I love that 'crash test dummy'-sticker on the hull! Apart from that: this boat goes well with the LandCruiser in the back! Yours? My son's dream combo: an old LC + RIB and boat, trotting along on European roads.
Well, up until now the boat has been named "Beastie," but I like "Wabi," too! Yes, that's my '78 FJ40. Now that is something I take care of. Bought it new in 1978, and then when I was picking out a Laser I spotted a blue & white one that matched the Land Cruiser.
 
Top