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Using a Sunfish for sailing/camping

Fremont

Member
GREAT VIDEOS!!! What an adventure!
Thanks for sharing them. I'm looking forward to your next videos.
Looks like a great voyage. I'm talking to my buddy Ralph about doing your trip with me on my Hobie next summer. (He's currently recovering from a bad mountain bike crash.)
What brand of drysuit do you have? I have one that's really hard to put on, and that shoulder zip looks easier.
I'm amazed at the amount of gear you can carry, in just a few bags. I'm a climber and backpacker too, so I've got good gear, but seems like my pack gets very full without much in it.
The SPOT is a very good idea. I may need one to placate my wife. Is that a GPS at your left shoulder?
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Good job on the Isle Royale videos, AIR, they brought back excellent memories of similar voyages off Baja. I like how well-prepared-and-equipped you were for this voyage, and I say that as a lifelong outdoorsman, sailor, technical rock climber & mountaineer. Keep up the good work, I'm looking forward to the other Isle Royale videos, though I'll probably just subscribe to your threads so I can view them directly, aye? ;)

That segment where you entered the inlet and were trying to navigate various channels between smaller islands, that was interesting because Nature threw a curveball your way... when sailing to Los Coronados off the northern end of Baja, I encountered similar problems. The steep slopes of the islands create large "wind shadows" and areas of confluence where winds meet from different directions, making navigation tricky. :confused:

Meh, patience is a virtue, and even the worst day of sailing is better than the best day in an office or a factory, LOL. I actually learned about some high-tech gadgetry from your videos, the SPOT device was pretty cool, like sending 'macros' via Qualcomm back in my 'trucking daze'---as an old rogue dinosaur, I'm behind the times with all the newfangled technology. One day I'll be dead and none of that will matter, I can't keep up with it anyway. :rolleyes:

ALRIGHT, HAND, GOOD JOB ON THE VIDEOS, THEY WERE VERY ENJOYABLE WITH A COLD BEER AT HAND... CHEERS!!! :cool:
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Damn, AIR, I just watched your "Canoeing with 6 dogs" video on YouTube, and that was a great video! So cool to see the dogs kicking back and occasionally roaming around in nature once you found a bivouac site... and the French circus music (or whatever that was) added just the right touch when the dogs started running and playing in the area. You and your wife are clearly good people, taking those critters along for the boat ride... somehow, I can't see my three cats peacefully making such a voyage. Anyway, keep up the good work with the videos... hopefully the other Isle Royale films will soon be ready to view. :cool:
 
GREAT VIDEOS!!! What an adventure!
Thanks for sharing them. I'm looking forward to your next videos.
Looks like a great voyage. I'm talking to my buddy Ralph about doing your trip with me on my Hobie next summer. (He's currently recovering from a bad mountain bike crash.)
What brand of drysuit do you have? I have one that's really hard to put on, and that shoulder zip looks easier.
I'm amazed at the amount of gear you can carry, in just a few bags. I'm a climber and backpacker too, so I've got good gear, but seems like my pack gets very full without much in it.
The SPOT is a very good idea. I may need one to placate my wife. Is that a GPS at your left shoulder?
Thanks for watching! It was an awesome experience. The drysuit is a Kokatat. The zip across the chest is easy to put on. Some people think they are less comfortable, but I have no complaints as long as I folded the zipper down under my life jacket. I've got another video coming that shows all the gear I brought. I've always believed that essential gear makes trips safer, where too much does the opposite. I try to bring gear that serves double duty and is compact. I've had plenty of experience packing light--especially from thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail. The left shoulder of my life jacket has a strobe light attached. It's just another form of signaling in case of emergency.
 

Seaotter5

Active Member
Thanks for watching! It was an awesome experience. The drysuit is a Kokatat. The zip across the chest is easy to put on. Some people think they are less comfortable, but I have no complaints as long as I folded the zipper down under my life jacket. I've got another video coming that shows all the gear I brought. I've always believed that essential gear makes trips safer, where too much does the opposite. I try to bring gear that serves double duty and is compact. I've had plenty of experience packing light--especially from thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail. The left shoulder of my life jacket has a strobe light attached. It's just another form of signaling in case of emergency.
What I have learned from your videos:
- take Dramamine before heading off-shore
- that I can get an affordable sat device to let my wife know she can’t cash in my life insurance in just yet
- a Sunfish might be too wide to use a kayak paddle efficiently. I will have to give that some thought.
- that if I am going out very far I am going to tie a Clorox bottle on my mast head. I don’t care how stupid it looks. I MIGHT be able to right the boat in waves like that if I capsized, but if it turtled on me there is no way I would get it upright again!
- If I try a long trip in a Sunfish I am going to test it with my Minifish rig first. It would be slower, but it might be less demanding on long passages. Unless the wind dies, of course!
- that I need to try using the Air Hawk cushion from my Kawasaki. It doesn’t look like the foam you put on your boat is cutting it.
- that I need to come up with systems that will allow me to stay hydrated when I can’t let go of the main sheet for very long. I am thinking Camelbak. It might not get all that hot in Minnesota, but it sure can where I go sailing. Not being able to take in lots of fluids on a regular basis for a couple of hours could become a serious problem.
- that the Great Lakes evidently have currents between islands. Sailing in tidal waters and rivers one gets used to that, but I had not considered that possibility on a Great Lake.
- and, most importantly, I am never, ever going to sail to Isle Royale, even on a large sailboat. I haven’t seen waves like that, even out in the ocean. It’s not the size, really, but the spacing.In my experience ocean waves are usually farther apart. I am really surprised that you never pitch poled. I know that you said the waves were far enough apart to prevent that, but with the weight of your gear up there, it must have been dicey!

Sorry the above is so long, but I used to teach, and I always appreciated it when one of my students showed that he was actually paying attention!
 
What I have learned from your videos:
- take Dramamine before heading off-shore
- that I can get an affordable sat device to let my wife know she can’t cash in my life insurance in just yet
- a Sunfish might be too wide to use a kayak paddle efficiently. I will have to give that some thought.
- that if I am going out very far I am going to tie a Clorox bottle on my mast head. I don’t care how stupid it looks. I MIGHT be able to right the boat in waves like that if I capsized, but if it turtled on me there is no way I would get it upright again!
- If I try a long trip in a Sunfish I am going to test it with my Minifish rig first. It would be slower, but it might be less demanding on long passages. Unless the wind dies, of course!
- that I need to try using the Air Hawk cushion from my Kawasaki. It doesn’t look like the foam you put on your boat is cutting it.
- that I need to come up with systems that will allow me to stay hydrated when I can’t let go of the main sheet for very long. I am thinking Camelbak. It might not get all that hot in Minnesota, but it sure can where I go sailing. Not being able to take in lots of fluids on a regular basis for a couple of hours could become a serious problem.
- that the Great Lakes evidently have currents between islands. Sailing in tidal waters and rivers one gets used to that, but I had not considered that possibility on a Great Lake.
- and, most importantly, I am never, ever going to sail to Isle Royale, even on a large sailboat. I haven’t seen waves like that, even out in the ocean. It’s not the size, really, but the spacing.In my experience ocean waves are usually farther apart. I am really surprised that you never pitch poled. I know that you said the waves were far enough apart to prevent that, but with the weight of your gear up there, it must have been dicey!

Sorry the above is so long, but I used to teach, and I always appreciated it when one of my students showed that he was actually paying attention!
I see you were taking notes.
--100% agree on Dramamine. That was not expected or anticipated.
--the Spot Gen 3's (most like the one I wore) gives you one way communication and cost about $150
--I had no issue using the kayak paddle with the Sunfish. I didn't think it was too wide. I wouldn't want to paddle it all day, but it wasn't a problem. If you were concerned about it, you could also buy a kayak paddle extension. They are commonly used when paddling a canoe with a kayak paddle.
--If you have trouble with righting your Sunfish, the bottle would be a great idea. You can but a "mast float" or "mast pillow float" for sailboats anyway, so it wouldn't be too strange.
--My first recommendation for the sail is...don't do long crossings or go out in crazy winds.... That being said, and because that's a hypocritical statement, I would suggest having lots of time for big trips so you can make decisions to sail on the better wind days. I spend much of my time trying to figure out how to rig the Sunfish sail to be smaller, but couldn't come up with anything reliable that wouldn't damage it. The Minifish sail sounds like a great idea if you know it's going to be high winds. The challenge with going smaller from the start for doing a crossing, is now you've increased your time on the water which gives more of a chance for weather to change, darkness to set in, you to get cold, hungry, uncomfortable.
--The foam made a HUGE difference. I'm working on another video to review it. It's not like sitting on the couch, but it's noticeably more comfortable. It's also attached, so there's no need to keep track of something else, or worry about a separate cushion sliding.
--I did stay hydrated and always treated more water when needed (even if the waves). It wouldn't have been an issue with 2 liters. The Camelback idea sounds like a good one.
--There weren't currents between the islands. You might be seeing the wave action pushing through.
--The waves on Superior (and other great lakes) are renowned to be steep and close because they are formed solely by wind as apposed to tides. I did pitch pole a couple times running down wind. I was passing 3 foot waves with 35mph winds. I would dive in, the stern would raise up with the following wave, then the wind would spin the entire boat 90 degrees. Unfortunately, I didn't get that on video, but I was fairly preoccupied.
--No worries on the length. I appreciate learning from others as well, so I enjoy the insights. I do a bit of teaching myself so I get it.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
A spare boom-mounted Go-Pro would make for interesting viewing.

I've pop-riveted a standard CD under my 6-inch inspection port cover. It makes a handy lightweight, yet powerful mirror that is always "at hand".

There's a huge storage space below the forward deck. While small items (keys,cellphone) can disappear aft within the hull, check out the following thread to add storage space for a sea anchor, Sailfish sail, flares, dye, kayak paddle-extenders, manual bailers (for when not underway), dry/warm clothes, or extra food...:
 

Seaotter5

Active Member
I see you were taking notes.
--100% agree on Dramamine. That was not expected or anticipated.
--the Spot Gen 3's (most like the one I wore) gives you one way communication and cost about $150
--I had no issue using the kayak paddle with the Sunfish. I didn't think it was too wide. I wouldn't want to paddle it all day, but it wasn't a problem. If you were concerned about it, you could also buy a kayak paddle extension. They are commonly used when paddling a canoe with a kayak paddle.
--If you have trouble with righting your Sunfish, the bottle would be a great idea. You can but a "mast float" or "mast pillow float" for sailboats anyway, so it wouldn't be too strange.
--My first recommendation for the sail is...don't do long crossings or go out in crazy winds.... That being said, and because that's a hypocritical statement, I would suggest having lots of time for big trips so you can make decisions to sail on the better wind days. I spend much of my time trying to figure out how to rig the Sunfish sail to be smaller, but couldn't come up with anything reliable that wouldn't damage it. The Minifish sail sounds like a great idea if you know it's going to be high winds. The challenge with going smaller from the start for doing a crossing, is now you've increased your time on the water which gives more of a chance for weather to change, darkness to set in, you to get cold, hungry, uncomfortable.
--The foam made a HUGE difference. I'm working on another video to review it. It's not like sitting on the couch, but it's noticeably more comfortable. It's also attached, so there's no need to keep track of something else, or worry about a separate cushion sliding.
--I did stay hydrated and always treated more water when needed (even if the waves). It wouldn't have been an issue with 2 liters. The Camelback idea sounds like a good one.
--There weren't currents between the islands. You might be seeing the wave action pushing through.
--The waves on Superior (and other great lakes) are renowned to be steep and close because they are formed solely by wind as apposed to tides. I did pitch pole a couple times running down wind. I was passing 3 foot waves with 35mph winds. I would dive in, the stern would raise up with the following wave, then the wind would spin the entire boat 90 degrees. Unfortunately, I didn't get that on video, but I was fairly preoccupied.
--No worries on the length. I appreciate learning from others as well, so I enjoy the insights. I do a bit of teaching myself so I get it.
Thank you for correcting my mis-observations! I am glad to hear that the kayak paddle worked, as I really wasn’t coming up with a viable alternative. I already have the extra long paddles for my huge Old Town Tandem.
I am glad the foam worked. You sure didn’t look comfortable, but that’s understandable, under the circumstances.
Dude, those waves.... I am not entirely positive that I would have gotten back in the boat the next day. But I am enjoying your videos, so I am glad you did!
 
Good job on the Isle Royale videos, AIR, they brought back excellent memories of similar voyages off Baja. I like how well-prepared-and-equipped you were for this voyage, and I say that as a lifelong outdoorsman, sailor, technical rock climber & mountaineer. Keep up the good work, I'm looking forward to the other Isle Royale videos, though I'll probably just subscribe to your threads so I can view them directly, aye? ;)

That segment where you entered the inlet and were trying to navigate various channels between smaller islands, that was interesting because Nature threw a curveball your way... when sailing to Los Coronados off the northern end of Baja, I encountered similar problems. The steep slopes of the islands create large "wind shadows" and areas of confluence where winds meet from different directions, making navigation tricky. :confused:

Meh, patience is a virtue, and even the worst day of sailing is better than the best day in an office or a factory, LOL. I actually learned about some high-tech gadgetry from your videos, the SPOT device was pretty cool, like sending 'macros' via Qualcomm back in my 'trucking daze'---as an old rogue dinosaur, I'm behind the times with all the newfangled technology. One day I'll be dead and none of that will matter, I can't keep up with it anyway. :rolleyes:

ALRIGHT, HAND, GOOD JOB ON THE VIDEOS, THEY WERE VERY ENJOYABLE WITH A COLD BEER AT HAND... CHEERS!!! :cool:
Hey. Thanks so much for your kind comments! I also have a decent amoutn of outdoor experience (thru hiking AT, biking cross country, canoeing the entire Yukon River, leading climbing, mountain biking, backpacking....) I also did 3.5 years of Adventure Education in college along with my Psychology degree, so I try to draw from all of that to think things through and remain safe.

There are now 3 videos of that Isle Royale trip posted, one more coming on Thursday and another next Monday.

I've considered sailing my Sunfish down the Mexican side of Baja. Any suggestions? Cautions? Must sees? etc.

The Spot I've been using is very simple, one way communication. Press 2 buttons and wait for blinking lights. You could handle that just fine.
 
Damn, AIR, I just watched your "Canoeing with 6 dogs" video on YouTube, and that was a great video! So cool to see the dogs kicking back and occasionally roaming around in nature once you found a bivouac site... and the French circus music (or whatever that was) added just the right touch when the dogs started running and playing in the area. You and your wife are clearly good people, taking those critters along for the boat ride... somehow, I can't see my three cats peacefully making such a voyage. Anyway, keep up the good work with the videos... hopefully the other Isle Royale films will soon be ready to view. :cool:
Thank you! We were hoping to go again with all the dogs last weekend, but it was forecast to pour the entire time, so we are going in a couple weeks instead. Cats and water might be a bit more stressful for all... There are 3 Isle Royale films out and the others should be posted Thursday and Monday. Thanks for watching.
 
A spare boom-mounted Go-Pro would make for interesting viewing.

I've pop-riveted a standard CD under my 6-inch inspection port cover. It makes a handy lightweight, yet powerful mirror that is always "at hand".

There's a huge storage space below the forward deck. While small items (keys,cellphone) can disappear aft within the hull, check out the following thread to add storage space for a sea anchor, Sailfish sail, flares, dye, kayak paddle-extenders, manual bailers (for when not underway), dry/warm clothes, or extra food...:
I'm hoping to get a second GoPro. I've been filming everything with one, which means I have to stop in waves on a tiny boat and move the camera for different views. I also need to make or buy a better boom mount.

I like the mirror idea. My only concern would be making my Sunfish prone to filling in the worst weather when I may be needing help. I'll have to think on that one.

I've been avoiding putting a hole in the deck with an inspection port so far...although the hull is wet inside and I only have the small drain hole to "dry" it through. I most like the idea of storing the extra sail and anchor up there. Thanks for the ideas.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
I also did 3.5 years of Adventure Education in college...

I've considered sailing my Sunfish down the Mexican side of Baja. Any suggestions? Cautions? Must sees? etc.
Damn, they actually have "Adventure Education" in college nowadays? Now I know I'm getting old... back in the day, we learned by heading into the wilderness with what gear we thought might come in handy, LOL. :confused:

Guess I can't fault modern explorers & adventurers for using what resources are available... with crew & climbing partners back in the day, our inspiration came from books and magazine photos, go figure. :rolleyes:

Now everything is so intertwined with modern technology, it takes some of the thrill away... I suppose it's safer, but I miss the old days when uncertainty was always a factor. Kinda made it more exciting, and the "epics" were all the more traumatic, LOL. :eek:

Anyway, I always wanted to sail my Laser the length of Baja, especially after reading about some hand who sailed his Hobie Cat the length of the peninsula, camping on beaches and whatnot as he went. A good reach and occasional run, sailing down the coast of Baja... :D

But you know the old Catch-22: when I had the time, I didn't have the money, and when I had the money, I didn't have the time. That has essentially been the story of my life, otherwise I probably would've accomplished far more than I have, LOL. ;)

Reminds me of my friend, former professional surfer Mikey J., who had 29 photos in the surf mags, including a centerfold spread in SURFER MAGAZINE with Mikey in a HUGE Hawaiian barrel... he & I always got along well, because we both respected one another's achievements in this crazy world. :cool:

I ever hit the Big-Time, I'll go find Mikey and drag him along on my Baja Adventure, making sure to visit Todos Santos so Mikey can ride those monster waves... that place can be dangerous, believe me, with tons of water crashing down in the impact zone. :eek:

Not the place to be aboard your Sunfish or Laser, unless you're totally clued in to the situation. As for the rest of Baja, exercise caution and consult what guides exist, I'm sure there are plenty out there nowadays. Way back when, the deeper ya went into Mexico, the safer it was, not counting larger cities... :(

You'll need some sort of newfangled permit or "hall pass" to sail in Mexican waters, or so I heard several years ago, and you'll want to stash money and papers in a safe place... take the usual precautions against thievery & piracy (including gubmint piracy, LOL), and you'll probably be okay. :rolleyes:

Tempting as it is to carry a 'pistola' into Mexico, know that it is a serious offense which will land you in prison pronto if the gat is discovered... same goes for ammo. The border towns have the most riff-raff, those and the larger cities down south; the rural & semi-rural folk are friendly & appreciate tourist cash. :D

More on this later, but you have a good idea in sailing your Sunfish the length of the Baja peninsula... it is a good reach and occasional run which will see you bending on the knots, as opposed to thrashing to windward in heavy seas, LOL. :confused:

You also have the know-how when it comes to modern technology, which will make your voyage even safer... you'll have to get creative with the hammock scene, since there aren't that many trees on the coast, LOL, but I have faith in ya, I'm sure you'll figure it out. ;)

GOTTA RUN, I PROMISED A FRIEND THAT I'D CALL RIGHT BACK... I'LL CHECK OUT THOSE ADDITIONAL ISLE ROYALE VIDEOS SOON, AYE? :cool:

Edit: Oh, hell, I just reread your quote and it sounds like ya wanna sail the Sea of Cortez? Naaaah, dude, go BIG and sail the Pacific side of Baja, that fresh breeze will keep your Sunfish hauling @$$, LOL. If anything, do the Sea of Cortez later, you'll gain more "nautical adventure cred" by sailing down the west coast of the peninsula, same way the dude in the Hobie Cat did. But he didn't have the modern camera gear, bro, so you can make a statement on the web!!! :rolleyes:
 
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Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Todos Santos video links:






There were other videos, including a video of monster surf down in Puerto Escondido, but that's much farther south on mainland Mexico... just know that there are dicey areas off Baja, but one can navigate around 'em and still enjoy the scenery. As for nightly Sunfish bivouacs, you can pull some research, I know others have written articles or guides about "gunkholing" down the coast. Of course, much of the Baja coastline is rocky and inhospitable, so you might have long stretches or legs to sail between good bivouac sites. You'd probably wanna figure all that out beforehand, for safety's sake... :confused:

Just tossin' this your way, since you sound like the kinda guy who might actually make it happen. I thought of sailing a Laser down the peninsula, but I reckon I would've sold the boat (or donated her) once I reached Cabo, then simply made my way back by land or air. Maybe times have changed and you can rent a vehicle in Cabo, then drop it off in Tijuana or wherever. Again, I only mention this because it would be a grand adventure, and your videos would be awesome! You also might enlist help on shore, in the form of a driver to meet you at designated bivouac sites... then you could cart the boat back no worries. :rolleyes:

"VIVA MEXICO!!!"---LOL, just don't forget your first aid kit, antibiotics, and plenty of bottled water (in the chase vehicle, perhaps). The rest of your gear... well, you know what to bring. I'm hoping that you seriously consider such a voyage, as it would certainly be a grand voyage and heller nautical adventure!!! Shee-it, just sailing to Los Coronados was a grand adventure back in the day, might as well be on another planet once you cross the international marine border. One more bit of advice, from a former OTR truck driver to a married man: stay away from those bordellos, your antibiotics won't do you any good there, LOL. :eek:

CHEERS!!! ;)

Edit: Some of those surfing scenes where multiple guys are dropping in remind me of rush hour traffic on the 405... except the surfers are moving faster than the vehicles on the freeway, LOL. :cool:
 
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lckeffer

Member
Adventures in Reach. here is some feedback for you....My intent is to be helpful and not critical so no offense intended and hopefully none is taken. I really enjoyed your videos and your effort to make them. So let me start by saying Thank you.

While watching video two you left me hanging on the trail to the cave. Fortunately I didnt have to wait too long for video three.

your boat needs an outhaul to give your sail a flatter shape. then you will have better control of the boat in the big stuff.

you did awesome showing us hauling the boat safely on shore. i was looking for your camp site, meal prep, and clean up. From your comments on this list I feel your a bit of an expert in this...As a racer, I can sail a sunfish fast but I dont know squat about camping for more than one night with minimal setup. I know I could watch some camping vids but you have combined my current sailing interest with my future camping interest. Even links to purchase gear you like would be cool.

bring on the "how you did it" stuff. the spot section was really cool. more of that?

the social interaction with meeting other sailors is also a cool aspect of this kind of adventure. if they will agree, including vids of this would be really cool. I would have loved to see their response when you told them you were doing a 150 mike trip in a sunfish

If you do a baha trip count me in. I'm even interested in making a trip your direction to join you on the next trip.

Thanks again.

Rick
Las Cruces,NM
 

Fremont

Member
Damn, they actually have "Adventure Education" in college nowadays? Now I know I'm getting old... back in the day, we learned by heading into the wilderness with what gear we thought might come in handy, LOL. :confused:
Hah! What, you never heard of NOLS or OWLS? Great organizations, been around a looonnng time.

"Adventure Education" is an education degree. It's an experiential method of teaching. I'm not degreed, but I did a fair amount of teaching using these methods through the YMCA and as an industrial instructor.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Ah, those outdoor leadership schools ring a bell, but my friends & I were social outcasts, skateboarders from broken homes (back when skateboarding was still a crime), so we never gravitated toward such schools or organizations. I learned to rappel in the Infantry, then started taking friends out to cliffs for that purpose, and we wound up meeting some cool climbers who "showed us the ropes" (pun intended). I guess you can say we were generally self-taught, but those climbers we met were mentors of a sort... and I spent the next 25 or 30 years having some pretty cool adventures. :rolleyes:

Sailing was a bit different... after my dad split and left us in the lurch, we were totally strapped, but we still had our dependent I.D. cards from the Navy, and we were lucky to stumble across the best deal ever offered by Recreation Services (now MWR or whatever). For $60, me beloved mum purchased an annual family membership at the San Diego Naval Sailing Club (SDNSC), and this opened the doors to free courses of instruction, plus free sailing aboard the small craft fleet: Lasers, Lido 14s, Capri 14s & Rebel 16s. Our family was huge too, so the club really took a beating on that $60 deal. :confused:

Anyway, it's good to know that young adults are being taught about the wilderness, my friends & I just came from a separate reality where cash was scarce, and much of what we learned was picked up in the field as we went along, aye? That's just the way it was... I can still remember pedaling my paperbike down the Strand to SDNSC every weekend and throughout each summer, to take advantage of the "free boat rentals" which came with our membership once we were qualified skippers. Now I think they charge, even for the smaller craft, but in those days we were fortunate to enjoy such a great deal on sailing. ;)

Edit: Our sailing club membership dated back to the early-and-mid-1970s, while the climbing began a decade or so later... :cool:
 
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Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
So, AIR, I watched Part 4 of the Isle Royale voyage, nice knockdown at the end, LOL. Maybe I didn't notice in previous video parts, but you aren't wearing gloves in this latest part? Personal preference? With saltwater sailing, and tending the mainsheet by hand most of the time, I practically needed gloves to protect my hands... that salt helps to rub skin raw when tending a sheet. Plus those reefs on the islands can get nasty, and gloves came in handy if I had to steady myself while clambering ashore. Same goes for footgear, I always had Sperrys or Sperry WaveRunners back in the day, or thick-soled surf booties to keep my feet from getting torn up on those reefs. You'll want good gloves & footgear if you tackle Baja, I guarantee it... don't wanna be sidelined by an injury in the middle of your voyage. :confused:

Otherwise, great job on the latest video, I'm really enjoying these videos since I'll probably never get the chance to sail round Isle Royale... beautiful wilderness venue, that's for sure, just the sort of place where I'd dig camping. Oh, yeah, that was a great bivouac site, the one where your tent AND the hammock were in the dry, LOL. Excellent selection. Were you building campfires all along? I know I saw one fire in a previous video, I'm the kind of outdoorsman who likes a good fire in the evening, just to warm up and make the bivouac site more pleasant. Keeps bugs in check too, though that may not have been a factor this late in the year? A nice fire would've been perfect in that bivouac site... even a smaller campfire, just to make the whole scene more cheerful. Again, great job on the videos, I'm looking forward to the final part!!! :)

I'm also wondering how the night skies were during your voyage? A million stars overhead, or just cloud cover? Can't be that much light pollution up there around Isle Royale... hopefully you had some primo night skies to enjoy. That's one thing about Baja, you get far enough away from the towns and you'll see a million stars, even on the coast if a night breeze sweeps the cloud cover away. I'll never forget that Perseid Meteor Shower I witnessed from the summit of Isla Norte, ironically all the astronomers in San Diego County missed it because the mainland was socked in with cloud cover. There was even a blurb to that effect in the local rag (San Diego Union-Tribune), but I wound up with a grandstand seat... or at least a couple of Mexican blankets, LOL. Greatest solo night of my life, that particular voyage, never seen such a spectacular meteor shower... :rolleyes:

ALRIGHT, HAND, I'M OFF TO CHILLAX, JUST WANTED TO GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE. FUNNY LINE ABOUT CLAIMING THE VOYAGE, FOLKS SAID THE SAME THING ABOUT LANDING A LASER ON ALL FOUR OF LOS CORONADOS: "CRAZY BASTARD!!!" :cool:

Meh, they just didn't know what they were missing... didn't have a friggin' clue, actually, but that's not my problem. ;)
 
Ah, those outdoor leadership schools ring a bell, but my friends & I were social outcasts, skateboarders from broken homes (back when skateboarding was still a crime), so we never gravitated toward such schools or organizations. I learned to rappel in the Infantry, then started taking friends out to cliffs for that purpose, and we wound up meeting some cool climbers who "showed us the ropes" (pun intended). I guess you can say we were generally self-taught, but those climbers we met were mentors of a sort... and I spent the next 25 or 30 years having some pretty cool adventures. :rolleyes:

Sailing was a bit different... after my dad split and left us in the lurch, we were totally strapped, but we still had our dependent I.D. cards from the Navy, and we were lucky to stumble across the best deal ever offered by Recreation Services (now MWR or whatever). For $60, me beloved mum purchased an annual family membership at the San Diego Naval Sailing Club (SDNSC), and this opened the doors to free courses of instruction, plus free sailing aboard the small craft fleet: Lasers, Lido 14s, Capri 14s & Rebel 16s. Our family was huge too, so the club really took a beating on that $60 deal. :confused:

Anyway, it's good to know that young adults are being taught about the wilderness, my friends & I just came from a separate reality where cash was scarce, and much of what we learned was picked up in the field as we went along, aye? That's just the way it was... I can still remember pedaling my paperbike down the Strand to SDNSC every weekend and throughout each summer, to take advantage of the "free boat rentals" which came with our membership once we were qualified skippers. Now I think they charge, even for the smaller craft, but in those days we were fortunate to enjoy such a great deal on sailing. ;)

Edit: Our sailing club membership dated back to the early-and-mid-1970s, while the climbing began a decade or so later... :cool:
It sounds like you have quite a story that likely makes you very appreciative of what you have and value the times you are able to get out on the water. Sailing...or any other outdoor adventure, is such a great way to unwind, escape, and re-center so I'm always excited when people get out there. Thanks for sharing.
 
Damn, they actually have "Adventure Education" in college nowadays? Now I know I'm getting old... back in the day, we learned by heading into the wilderness with what gear we thought might come in handy, LOL. :confused:

Guess I can't fault modern explorers & adventurers for using what resources are available... with crew & climbing partners back in the day, our inspiration came from books and magazine photos, go figure. :rolleyes:

Now everything is so intertwined with modern technology, it takes some of the thrill away... I suppose it's safer, but I miss the old days when uncertainty was always a factor. Kinda made it more exciting, and the "epics" were all the more traumatic, LOL. :eek:

Anyway, I always wanted to sail my Laser the length of Baja, especially after reading about some hand who sailed his Hobie Cat the length of the peninsula, camping on beaches and whatnot as he went. A good reach and occasional run, sailing down the coast of Baja... :D

But you know the old Catch-22: when I had the time, I didn't have the money, and when I had the money, I didn't have the time. That has essentially been the story of my life, otherwise I probably would've accomplished far more than I have, LOL. ;)

Reminds me of my friend, former professional surfer Mikey J., who had 29 photos in the surf mags, including a centerfold spread in SURFER MAGAZINE with Mikey in a HUGE Hawaiian barrel... he & I always got along well, because we both respected one another's achievements in this crazy world. :cool:

I ever hit the Big-Time, I'll go find Mikey and drag him along on my Baja Adventure, making sure to visit Todos Santos so Mikey can ride those monster waves... that place can be dangerous, believe me, with tons of water crashing down in the impact zone. :eek:

Not the place to be aboard your Sunfish or Laser, unless you're totally clued in to the situation. As for the rest of Baja, exercise caution and consult what guides exist, I'm sure there are plenty out there nowadays. Way back when, the deeper ya went into Mexico, the safer it was, not counting larger cities... :(

You'll need some sort of newfangled permit or "hall pass" to sail in Mexican waters, or so I heard several years ago, and you'll want to stash money and papers in a safe place... take the usual precautions against thievery & piracy (including gubmint piracy, LOL), and you'll probably be okay. :rolleyes:

Tempting as it is to carry a 'pistola' into Mexico, know that it is a serious offense which will land you in prison pronto if the gat is discovered... same goes for ammo. The border towns have the most riff-raff, those and the larger cities down south; the rural & semi-rural folk are friendly & appreciate tourist cash. :D

More on this later, but you have a good idea in sailing your Sunfish the length of the Baja peninsula... it is a good reach and occasional run which will see you bending on the knots, as opposed to thrashing to windward in heavy seas, LOL. :confused:

You also have the know-how when it comes to modern technology, which will make your voyage even safer... you'll have to get creative with the hammock scene, since there aren't that many trees on the coast, LOL, but I have faith in ya, I'm sure you'll figure it out. ;)

GOTTA RUN, I PROMISED A FRIEND THAT I'D CALL RIGHT BACK... I'LL CHECK OUT THOSE ADDITIONAL ISLE ROYALE VIDEOS SOON, AYE? :cool:

Edit: Oh, hell, I just reread your quote and it sounds like ya wanna sail the Sea of Cortez? Naaaah, dude, go BIG and sail the Pacific side of Baja, that fresh breeze will keep your Sunfish hauling @$$, LOL. If anything, do the Sea of Cortez later, you'll gain more "nautical adventure cred" by sailing down the west coast of the peninsula, same way the dude in the Hobie Cat did. But he didn't have the modern camera gear, bro, so you can make a statement on the web!!! :rolleyes:
I hadn't thought about it earlier, because he usually refers to the "Sea of Cortez" , but he sails down there (Baja) most years and is familiar with how it might be for a small boat. The surf would certainly be a consideration though since I can't just drop an anchor and sleep on board. Thanks for the insights. All good info. Great reminder for hiding money and not carrying a weapon...bear spray perhaps??
 
So, AIR, I watched Part 4 of the Isle Royale voyage, nice knockdown at the end, LOL. Maybe I didn't notice in previous video parts, but you aren't wearing gloves in this latest part? Personal preference? With saltwater sailing, and tending the mainsheet by hand most of the time, I practically needed gloves to protect my hands... that salt helps to rub skin raw when tending a sheet. Plus those reefs on the islands can get nasty, and gloves came in handy if I had to steady myself while clambering ashore. Same goes for footgear, I always had Sperrys or Sperry WaveRunners back in the day, or thick-soled surf booties to keep my feet from getting torn up on those reefs. You'll want good gloves & footgear if you tackle Baja, I guarantee it... don't wanna be sidelined by an injury in the middle of your voyage. :confused:

Otherwise, great job on the latest video, I'm really enjoying these videos since I'll probably never get the chance to sail round Isle Royale... beautiful wilderness venue, that's for sure, just the sort of place where I'd dig camping. Oh, yeah, that was a great bivouac site, the one where your tent AND the hammock were in the dry, LOL. Excellent selection. Were you building campfires all along? I know I saw one fire in a previous video, I'm the kind of outdoorsman who likes a good fire in the evening, just to warm up and make the bivouac site more pleasant. Keeps bugs in check too, though that may not have been a factor this late in the year? A nice fire would've been perfect in that bivouac site... even a smaller campfire, just to make the whole scene more cheerful. Again, great job on the videos, I'm looking forward to the final part!!! :)

I'm also wondering how the night skies were during your voyage? A million stars overhead, or just cloud cover? Can't be that much light pollution up there around Isle Royale... hopefully you had some primo night skies to enjoy. That's one thing about Baja, you get far enough away from the towns and you'll see a million stars, even on the coast if a night breeze sweeps the cloud cover away. I'll never forget that Perseid Meteor Shower I witnessed from the summit of Isla Norte, ironically all the astronomers in San Diego County missed it because the mainland was socked in with cloud cover. There was even a blurb to that effect in the local rag (San Diego Union-Tribune), but I wound up with a grandstand seat... or at least a couple of Mexican blankets, LOL. Greatest solo night of my life, that particular voyage, never seen such a spectacular meteor shower... :rolleyes:

ALRIGHT, HAND, I'M OFF TO CHILLAX, JUST WANTED TO GIVE CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE. FUNNY LINE ABOUT CLAIMING THE VOYAGE, FOLKS SAID THE SAME THING ABOUT LANDING A LASER ON ALL FOUR OF LOS CORONADOS: "CRAZY BASTARD!!!" :cool:

Meh, they just didn't know what they were missing... didn't have a friggin' clue, actually, but that's not my problem. ;)
I generally don't wear gloves unless it's really cold. I didn't wear them for that whole trip. It was freshwater, so I'm sure that makes a huge difference. I also use the cleat for the mainsheet most of the time to take pressure off my hands. If the rocks are sharper, I'd certainly wear some rocks--especially when going ashore. I didn't do fires most nights. That's partly because they weren't allowed in several of the sites, and sometimes I was getting in late and had a big day, so I just preferred to lay in the hammock, read, and sleep. I certainly agree that a fire improves the ambience and adds cheer.

The night sky's were wonderful a couple nights, and otherwise clouded. I didn't even think about including those shots. I'm still trying to get in the swing of making video of all the different aspects and often just get caught up in the moment without my camera. Watching that meteor shower sounds like a great moment.
 
Adventures in Reach. here is some feedback for you....My intent is to be helpful and not critical so no offense intended and hopefully none is taken. I really enjoyed your videos and your effort to make them. So let me start by saying Thank you.

While watching video two you left me hanging on the trail to the cave. Fortunately I didnt have to wait too long for video three.

your boat needs an outhaul to give your sail a flatter shape. then you will have better control of the boat in the big stuff.

you did awesome showing us hauling the boat safely on shore. i was looking for your camp site, meal prep, and clean up. From your comments on this list I feel your a bit of an expert in this...As a racer, I can sail a sunfish fast but I dont know squat about camping for more than one night with minimal setup. I know I could watch some camping vids but you have combined my current sailing interest with my future camping interest. Even links to purchase gear you like would be cool.

bring on the "how you did it" stuff. the spot section was really cool. more of that?

the social interaction with meeting other sailors is also a cool aspect of this kind of adventure. if they will agree, including vids of this would be really cool. I would have loved to see their response when you told them you were doing a 150 mike trip in a sunfish

If you do a baha trip count me in. I'm even interested in making a trip your direction to join you on the next trip.

Thanks again.

Rick
Las Cruces,NM
No offense taken. I thoroughly appreciate any genuine feedback, thoughts, suggestions, so thank you. I did tighten the sail from my last time out, but I'll look into an outhaul or tightening further. I am working on some camp hack videos and can certainly start adding some camping info/advice into my videos. I'm also working on the links as well. I sometimes forget to record everything and and sometimes still shy with the camera around others. I don't want to impose without asking, but then I think asking or having a camera might effect how genuine the interaction is. I really value connections and don't want to muck it up. That being said, I could try initial intros then asking if they want to be included. Perhaps I'll post on here if I do the Baha trip. Let me know if you head this direction. I'm also considering heading south at some point this winter to do a trip. I'll have to see how work turns out. I'll keep you posted.
 
Todos Santos video links:






There were other videos, including a video of monster surf down in Puerto Escondido, but that's much farther south on mainland Mexico... just know that there are dicey areas off Baja, but one can navigate around 'em and still enjoy the scenery. As for nightly Sunfish bivouacs, you can pull some research, I know others have written articles or guides about "gunkholing" down the coast. Of course, much of the Baja coastline is rocky and inhospitable, so you might have long stretches or legs to sail between good bivouac sites. You'd probably wanna figure all that out beforehand, for safety's sake... :confused:

Just tossin' this your way, since you sound like the kinda guy who might actually make it happen. I thought of sailing a Laser down the peninsula, but I reckon I would've sold the boat (or donated her) once I reached Cabo, then simply made my way back by land or air. Maybe times have changed and you can rent a vehicle in Cabo, then drop it off in Tijuana or wherever. Again, I only mention this because it would be a grand adventure, and your videos would be awesome! You also might enlist help on shore, in the form of a driver to meet you at designated bivouac sites... then you could cart the boat back no worries. :rolleyes:

"VIVA MEXICO!!!"---LOL, just don't forget your first aid kit, antibiotics, and plenty of bottled water (in the chase vehicle, perhaps). The rest of your gear... well, you know what to bring. I'm hoping that you seriously consider such a voyage, as it would certainly be a grand voyage and heller nautical adventure!!! Shee-it, just sailing to Los Coronados was a grand adventure back in the day, might as well be on another planet once you cross the international marine border. One more bit of advice, from a former OTR truck driver to a married man: stay away from those bordellos, your antibiotics won't do you any good there, LOL. :eek:

CHEERS!!! ;)

Edit: Some of those surfing scenes where multiple guys are dropping in remind me of rush hour traffic on the 405... except the surfers are moving faster than the vehicles on the freeway, LOL. :cool:
The support vehicle...or boat sounds like a solid idea. Bringing antibiotics is a solid reminder as well. That's funny about bordellos...too scary...I'd stay away. Thanks for those videos too.
 
Hah! What, you never heard of NOLS or OWLS? Great organizations, been around a looonnng time.

"Adventure Education" is an education degree. It's an experiential method of teaching. I'm not degreed, but I did a fair amount of teaching using these methods through the YMCA and as an industrial instructor.
I lead a couple trips (canoeing in the Boundary Waters) recently, but I also use what I learned from Outdoor Education for teaching more than the outdoor skills.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
The support vehicle...or boat sounds like a solid idea. Bringing antibiotics is a solid reminder as well. That's funny about bordellos...too scary...I'd stay away. Thanks for those videos too.
The bordello line was a joke... my warped sense of humor, it takes a REAL daredevil to walk into one of those places south o' the border, believe me. :eek:

Did you catch the Baja island & coastal shots in the background of those videos? That's another reason why I included the videos, there's no lack of beautiful scenery down in Baja, ya just gotta be in the right place, like aboard a boat, LOL. ;)

Bear spray wouldn't be a bad idea for bivouacs ashore, and somehow that statement reminds me of a humorous incident involving bear spray... I might even be able to provide a link to another website where the story has already been told, I will go look for that thread and hopefully find it. :rolleyes:

Haven't checked your AIR link yet, hope that last Isle Royale installment is already up, that has been a very enjoyable series for me, as you're making voyages similar to those I pulled in Baja, just in a different but equally beautiful location. :D

Lemme go find that bear spray story, it's pretty darned funny... I spent six wonderful weeks camping in a forest of 300' Sitka Spruce trees in Bruceport, a small campground overlooking Willapa Bay in coastal WA, and the incident occurred in that forest. Lemme go find the story... :cool:
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Well, I was banned from a couple of sites that had killer photos of my bivouac site in the forest, and I guess the pics got lost after I was banned, PFFFFFT. :confused:

Couldn't find the story either, though I know it used to be there... but one site is totally kaput anyway, guess it went under after so many years. :(

I really wanted to link those bivouac site shots, I was living like a king in the forest, along with two cats... that was a real adventure, I enjoyed my time there. :rolleyes:

Anyway, you'll have to use your imagination when it comes to visualizing the forest of 300' tall Sitka Spruce trees, but here's the bear spray story... :eek:

I was camping in the forest, down at the end of a (dirt) spur road which ran along the wooded bluffs overlooking Willapa Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Nobody else around, and potential bear country, so I had a can of "Counter Assault" bear spray at hand in my campsite, along with a few firearms strategically concealed in tent, vehicle, etc. During the last month of my 6-week adventure, I ordered four cords of wood for my campfire... I was going through a cord per week, having wonderful blazing campfires morning and night. After each wood delivery, I would build an oval "fort" with the stacked firewood encircling my fire ring. Had a couple of camp chairs within the fort, near the fire on the weather side, and I routinely kept that can of bear spray in one of the armrest cup holders of those chairs. On the night this incident occurred, I had a good blaze going and I was pounding craft beers, so I was somewhat ripped before making dinner... ;)

Well, I had just thrown some more wood on the fire when I heard some weird noise in the darkened forest, and I stumbled a bit after tripping over uneven ground as I lurched toward the bear spray... my hand encountered the trigger (safety off) and a jet of bear spray shot out and struck me on my right pants leg. I grabbed some nearby paper towels in an effort to sop up some of the wetness, then I hurled those towels into the fire. Ten seconds later, I made the grievous error of using that same hand to wipe my face... Sweet Tap-Dancing Baby Jesus!!! Next thing I know, MY FACE IS ON F#%NG FIRE, I'm talking MOLTEN LAVA from a National Geographic Special, aye? All I could do was ride it out, my face turned skyward and my voice raised in a long Charlie Brown yell: "AAAAAAUUUUGHHH!!!" It was crazy, standing there drunk in this tall forest of Sitka Spruce with my face feeling like it was just gonna explode... :eek:

Whatever critter might have been in the surrounding woods was surely frightened away by this loud disturbance, which is probably a good thing since I was practically blind anyway, tears streaming down my cheeks as I put up with the SLOW CHEMICAL BURN... in retrospect, it was pretty funny, but I can assure you that I was NOT laughing as my face turned into MOLTEN LAVA!!! I'll tell ya what, that bear spray actually WORKS, and I personally recommend the "Counter Assault" brand, having field tested it to my satisfaction up in Bruceport, WA, LOL. Lemme tell ya, once the painful chemical burn wore off, I carefully put the safety back on the can before grabbing another beer. On a culinary note, that bear spray might work wonders in spicing up tacos & burritos, PRONTO!!! Whatever they're using in that "Counter Assault" spray, it works like gangbusters!!! Not a bad weapon for self-defense, just gotta be careful with it... :rolleyes:

WELL, GUESS I'LL GO CHECK YOUR AIR LINK TO SEE IF THAT VIDEO IS UP... CHEERS, MY FELLOW EXPLORER & NAUTICAL ADVENTURER!!! :cool:
 
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Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Wait, I found some file photos of my trip to the PNW (or Pacific Northwest), but I don't know if they were ever resized... I'm gonna try uploading some pics to see if they work. Not sure if I have any bivouac site shots, I'm still working on that, but I DO have some primo shots taken during spells of fine weather up there. When the sun shines in the PNW, the place is golden, problem is it only lasts a little while, then the rains set in for months at a time. Anyway, lemme try this photo upload... :rolleyes:

IMG_7712.JPG
IMG_7713.JPG
IMG_7728.JPG

Okay, I think this will work... first shot taken from South Bend, WA, looking downriver toward Willapa Bay (unseen in photo). Second shot looking upriver toward Raymond, WA, but there's a bend of the river in between, perhaps more than one bend. Third shot shows a primo fishing boat in front of a cheap rental flat that I took for 3 months after camping. Nice boat, I think it was all aluminum, built to take a pounding in the PNW. :confused:

Edit: According to state hydrologists, the Willapa River is the CLEANEST river in Washington State, and the oyster beds in Willapa Bay produce some of the finest oysters on the planet. :D
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Okay, let's see, what do I have here? Hmm, pardon the thread-jacking, but here are some shots of the surf contest in Westport, WA, which was actually pretty darned cool. The jetties there at the entrance to Gray's Harbor are pretty impressive, dunno if I still have any pics, but we're about to find out... :confused:

Damn, I found some classic pics, but they're not really tied in with this thread title, so maybe I'll just go start a PNW thread for Coastal Washington... after a beer break, of course. Hey, I went and talked to that trucking outfit here in Cochise County, nice trucks too, but more on that later... :rolleyes:
 
Well, I was banned from a couple of sites that had killer photos of my bivouac site in the forest, and I guess the pics got lost after I was banned, PFFFFFT. :confused:

Couldn't find the story either, though I know it used to be there... but one site is totally kaput anyway, guess it went under after so many years. :(

I really wanted to link those bivouac site shots, I was living like a king in the forest, along with two cats... that was a real adventure, I enjoyed my time there. :rolleyes:

Anyway, you'll have to use your imagination when it comes to visualizing the forest of 300' tall Sitka Spruce trees, but here's the bear spray story... :eek:

I was camping in the forest, down at the end of a (dirt) spur road which ran along the wooded bluffs overlooking Willapa Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Nobody else around, and potential bear country, so I had a can of "Counter Assault" bear spray at hand in my campsite, along with a few firearms strategically concealed in tent, vehicle, etc. During the last month of my 6-week adventure, I ordered four cords of wood for my campfire... I was going through a cord per week, having wonderful blazing campfires morning and night. After each wood delivery, I would build an oval "fort" with the stacked firewood encircling my fire ring. Had a couple of camp chairs within the fort, near the fire on the weather side, and I routinely kept that can of bear spray in one of the armrest cup holders of those chairs. On the night this incident occurred, I had a good blaze going and I was pounding craft beers, so I was somewhat ripped before making dinner... ;)

Well, I had just thrown some more wood on the fire when I heard some weird noise in the darkened forest, and I stumbled a bit after tripping over uneven ground as I lurched toward the bear spray... my hand encountered the trigger (safety off) and a jet of bear spray shot out and struck me on my right pants leg. I grabbed some nearby paper towels in an effort to sop up some of the wetness, then I hurled those towels into the fire. Ten seconds later, I made the grievous error of using that same hand to wipe my face... Sweet Tap-Dancing Baby Jesus!!! Next thing I know, MY FACE IS ON F#%NG FIRE, I'm talking MOLTEN LAVA from a National Geographic Special, aye? All I could do was ride it out, my face turned skyward and my voice raised in a long Charlie Brown yell: "AAAAAAUUUUGHHH!!!" It was crazy, standing there drunk in this tall forest of Sitka Spruce with my face feeling like it was just gonna explode... :eek:

Whatever critter might have been in the surrounding woods was surely frightened away by this loud disturbance, which is probably a good thing since I was practically blind anyway, tears streaming down my cheeks as I put up with the SLOW CHEMICAL BURN... in retrospect, it was pretty funny, but I can assure you that I was NOT laughing as my face turned into MOLTEN LAVA!!! I'll tell ya what, that bear spray actually WORKS, and I personally recommend the "Counter Assault" brand, having field tested it to my satisfaction up in Bruceport, WA, LOL. Lemme tell ya, once the painful chemical burn wore off, I carefully put the safety back on the can before grabbing another beer. On a culinary note, that bear spray might work wonders in spicing up tacos & burritos, PRONTO!!! Whatever they're using in that "Counter Assault" spray, it works like gangbusters!!! Not a bad weapon for self-defense, just gotta be careful with it... :rolleyes:

WELL, GUESS I'LL GO CHECK YOUR AIR LINK TO SEE IF THAT VIDEO IS UP... CHEERS, MY FELLOW EXPLORER & NAUTICAL ADVENTURER!!! :cool:
That took a little longer than expected, but the 5th video is now posted on YouTube.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
That video was great, good thing you had favorable conditions for the final leg of your voyage. And I know that feeling, that moment when you return to your launching site after a successful voyage... tired but elated, ya know? Later, perhaps even the next day after some rest, you dwell on the coolest aspects of the overall voyage... and think how fortunate you were to be the one to make it. After my very first voyage to Los Coronados, I thought about that trip for a WEEK, it was so cool... then I sat down and wrote a story which was published in the San Diego Reader, they snapped it up right away because it was so unusual. I made $500 too, LOL. :rolleyes:

Having followed your voyage by watching the videos, I now feel as if I made the trip with ya... there were many similarities to those voyages I made in Mexican waters. And the Sunfish performed very well... I never thought the Sunfish was as tough as the Laser, able to withstand the rigors of such a voyage, but your videos proved otherwise, the boat handled the voyage no problem. Well, an occasional minor problem, only to be expected on such a voyage, given the task at hand and the nature of the craft you were sailing. Overcoming those problems and driving onward, that's what it takes on these radical wilderness adventures. ;)

And I like how you made it clear toward the end of this video: if someone isn't comfortable tackling such a voyage, that person should perhaps set a goal less ambitious, just to build confidence to the point where he or she is ready to tackle greater things. To me, marine safety is paramount, the top priority on every voyage (followed by gourmet food & beer, LOL). I only tackled the island voyages after years of coastal sailing, and I've spent much of my life in the field. You were very well-equipped for this Isle Royale voyage, which sets a good example to viewers of any skill level, so kudos to ya for promoting marine safety. :cool:

Ya know, I'm a still a bit tired this evening, some kind of reaction to all the recent stress... so I'm gonna post those PNW shots tomorrow. I DID receive good news on the job front today, which offset some of the bad news, but I just feel like getting some more rest. During my first voyage to Isla Norte, I crammed so much adventure into that first day that I called off further exploration of the island till the morrow... I returned to Summit Camp just to chill out and relax, enjoying the awesome panoramic view and the killer sunset. Even in the field, ya gotta take a break at times, get a little rest and recharge batteries for the next day's adventure. :D

Here's something you can look forward to in years ahead: meeting experienced sailors who grasp the nature and the enormity of the voyage you just made, circumnavigating Isle Royale in a 14' Sunfish!!! Back in Dago, I had experienced sailors do the classic double-take, jaws dropping in disbelief: "YOU SAILED A LASER OUT THERE AND SPENT THE NIGHT?!?" It wasn't the distance, you understand, but the dangerous landings in shark-infested Mexican waters... easy to tear up your boat on the reefs. And the land-based explorations were cool too, always a topic of interest to those same sailors. :eek:

Henceforth, whenever the opportunity arises and you are so inclined, you can casually drop word of your Isle Royale voyage into conversation... AND you have the videos or photo documentation to back your claims, LOL. I guarantee that some folks are going to sit up and take notice when you mention this voyage, especially those skilled sailors and outdoorsmen who understand what such a voyage entails. And believe me, I understand the enormity---there's no other word for it, LOL---the enormity of the voyage you just successfully completed. Spiritually, I was with ya every step of the way while watching those classic videos. ;)

SO KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!!! I HOPE TO VICARIOUSLY SHARE OTHER ADVENTURES WITH YA IN THE FUTURE... YOUR ISLE ROYALE ADVENTURE WAS BAD@$$, MY FRIEND!!! AS ONE INTREPID EXPLORER TO ANOTHER, I SALUTE YOU!!! CHEERS!!! :cool:
 
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Fremont

Member
Thanks, Matt! Loving your video records of your adventures, and I'm making plans for an Isle circumnavigation next year!
My comments about NOLS and education degrees were meant for CC, I knew you knew what they are! ;)

CC, hey, I did something similar. Throwing out an old can of pepper spray I found in the kitchen junk drawer, I thought I'd give it a test spray out of curiosity. Not being a moron, I turned my back to the wind. Disproving my self assessment that I'm not a moron, I didn't take into account that I was standing in a 10' wide gap between 2 houses that freshened the wind and created a suction vortex from my body. The spray came out in a stream, was atomized into a cloud by the vortex, and completely enveloped me. Boy howdy! That took the fight out of me for a while!
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
When that initial burst of pepper spray hit my pants leg, the associated cloud (whatever propellant they use as a vehicle) rolled right up toward my face, but I hastily stepped to one side to avoid it... it wasn't until I tossed the paper towels and carelessly wiped my face with my hand that the active ingredient(s) kicked in and the "scorched earth" feeling commenced. Pretty good heat for a slow chemical burn... :eek:

My "college daze" ended around 1990, so I'm behind the times with modern degrees, curricula, etc., I'm just glad that they're offering outdoor leadership courses & degrees, beats the usual leftist indoctrination hands down, LOL. Caught up on my sleep last night, so I guess I'll post up some PNW shots, maybe I can find a few pics of my "field command center" in Bruceport... a veritable glamping 'Hooverville' of tents & canopies in the forest. :rolleyes:
 
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