What's new

Transporting; deck up or deck down?

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Well, I spent a couple of hours at the DMV and got my taxes and registration squared away. I've seen and read different ways people get their boats to the water. I've got a full sized pickup with 8' 5'' of bed with the tailgate down. I eventually want to build a dolly that I can strap the boat to and load the whole package into the bed and strap that down. In the meantime, I plan on gathering various materials like big blankets and that pink construction foam to support the boat in a more haphazard way. It would be easier to load the boat deck up and move it that way but I read this can be bad for the hull if not supported correctly. I would have 5' 4'' hanging off the back of the truck. Is that too much to hang off the end? How careful do I have to be in this regard?
 

mixmkr

Well-Known Member
Would not a trailer be easier and actually support it best...or is this in an attempt to save some $ ? Used trailers that can be modified aren't all that pricey. At worst case, buy a utility trailer you can use for other stuff and make some portable bunks.
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
Is it a lifted disco truck? If it's not too high, you could install a lumber rack or something similar, pad the metal crossbars, and load the truck with the bow hanging over the hood of the truck. A high lift, to be sure, you'd need at least one friend or passerby to help you... I have seen racks just for kayaks and paddleboards, so it wouldn't have to be a full-sized lumber rack, I'm just using that as an example. The legal limit in CA for objects hanging off either end of your vehicle used to be 4', I believe, and that's with a red or orange flag attached to the outermost point or end of the object. Frankly, unless your truck is a lowrider, I'd recommend a small but sturdy trailer, you can pick up a used utility trailer for a cheap price, then strip it and modify it with a custom cradle or bunks... that would probably keep your nice new boat from getting banged up & scratched, aye??? Just sayin', as one who has tried all forms of transport... another option is to keep the hull on a rack at a club or marina, but that costs money and limits your options of where to sail. For Bodega Bay, I'm thinking a nice little trailer with working lights and good rubber. :cool:

P.S. Oh, yeah, for cartopping (or truck-topping) purposes, load the boat topside down, for trailering you want the hull in the cradle or bunks, so the boat is ready to launch as soon as you hit the ramp. If you skip the trailer, build or buy a dolly for wheeling the boat to and from the water's edge, it'll make your life WAY easier, LOL. CHEERS!!! :rolleyes:

Edit: There are also a few "E-Z Loader" type gizmos & inventions which use leverage, rails, whatever, to lift your boat into or above the cargo area or cab(in) of your vehicle, I never tried any of those, though I've seen one or two. Another option I remember is to add a metal extender or rack to the rear of your pickup, with that bolted on you may be able to legally begin the overhanging measurement from the end of THAT add-on, if you catch my drift---no, I have NOT been smoking crack, but I have had several beers, LOL---some manufacturers make those racks that bolt onto your rig, some look like barred buckets for holding cargo, 10-4? Try Googling "pickup truck cargo bed extender" or some such phrase, you might be able to buy one of those and modify it to suit your purposes. If you're a good hand at metalwork and welding, you could build such a rack yourself, or design one and pay someone to slap it together. THAT is a viable option, since it would offer greater support for your boat, minimize the offending overhang, and keep the boat at a workable height for loading and unloading, yeah? Pull a web search for such an add-on rack, you might find something that lets you quickly attach it, possibly after removing your truck's tailgate, yeah??? :eek:
 
Last edited:

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
Hey, Norcalsail, check out the MaxxTow MaxxHaul Truck Bed Extender/Load Extender, THAT little device could go right in your tow hitch, and with a bit of tweaking & padding, you could stow the boat in the cargo bed with the bow hanging out and resting on the padded crossbar. It looks as if you wouldn't have to lose the tailgate either, just lower it and use it for added support (with padding, pool noodles, small cradle or bunks for the bed, whatever). WTF, it would save ya the trailer registration fees & maintenance, keep ya legal, and provide enough support to not stress the boat hull or deck in any way. Big question is: can you adjust it to the necessary width, or can you simply plug it into the hitch receiver AFTER ya load the boat stern-first into the cargo bed? Looks to me like you could do one or the other, whichever is easier, aye??? Okay, that's my advice, don't say I never do ya any favors, LOL... meh, I just wanna see pics or Hero Cam footage of the Fish on Bodega Bay, that's my ulterior motive. :cool: ;) :cool:

P.S. Oh, yeah, you'll still need a dolly, in case you can't find parking right near the water's edge... :rolleyes:

Edit: Now that I took another glance at the options, the Erickson Big Bed Junior Load Extender looks even more suitable for the job, rating is similar but construction looks better for the purpose of hauling the Fish... you'll save coin either way, compared to buying a trailer and paying fees. As a notoriously cheap b@stard, I would stiff the DMV at any & every opportunity, LOL. :D
 
Last edited:

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the replies. I live on a busy street so was hoping to transport by lumber rack or truck bed and avoid a trailer.
Deck down is what I had been thinking as I want to take really good care of the thing, although deck up would be easier. Maybe if I can build a triangular dolly that is shaped to cradle the hull and have wheels on the wide end, I would be able to proceed as I described above. They do make bed extenders as described by Ghost Rider (with big red flags for the back). Tomorrow, I am going to try to just get it into the back of the truck deck down-very carefully. I would like to be able to move it by myself. If it comes down to it, I'll call my son in law-former Marine, 6'1', 215, all muscle. Gonna teach him how to sail as it may be his one day!
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Hey, Norcalsail, check out the MaxxTow MaxxHaul Truck Bed Extender/Load Extender, THAT little device could go right in your tow hitch, and with a bit of tweaking & padding, you could stow the boat in the cargo bed with the bow hanging out and resting on the padded crossbar. It looks as if you wouldn't have to lose the tailgate either, just lower it and use it for added support (with padding, pool noodles, small cradle or bunks for the bed, whatever). WTF, it would save ya the trailer registration fees & maintenance, keep ya legal, and provide enough support to not stress the boat hull or deck in any way. Big question is: can you adjust it to the necessary width, or can you simply plug it into the hitch receiver AFTER ya load the boat stern-first into the cargo bed? Looks to me like you could do one or the other, whichever is easier, aye??? Okay, that's my advice, don't say I never do ya any favors, LOL... meh, I just wanna see pics or Hero Cam footage of the Fish on Bodega Bay, that's my ulterior motive. :cool: ;) :cool:

P.S. Oh, yeah, you'll still need a dolly, in case you can't find parking right near the water's edge... :rolleyes:

Edit: Now that I took another glance at the options, the Erickson Big Bed Junior Load Extender looks even more suitable for the job, rating is similar but construction looks better for the purpose of hauling the Fish... you'll save coin either way, compared to buying a trailer and paying fees. As a notoriously cheap b@stard, I would stiff the DMV at any & every opportunity, LOL. :D
Hey Ghost Rider, I have seen those on E-bay and think they are rated to 700 lbs-if I remember correctly. Now that I dropped all this cash on the boat I'm kinda poor so want to transport it cheap. Those extenders are not too expensive though and with some of your suggestions, may work quite well. Gonna look at the Erickson right now. Cam on Bodega Bay huh? Maybe, my friend, maybe....
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
I copy the "kinda poor" number, been there, done that at times in my life... and I don't like giving the gubmint any more than I already do in fees & taxes, LOL. I think that's your solution, something like that Erickson extender, it looks like it can handle the job and still do it safely. With the right padding taped or otherwise wrapped around that crossbar, you'd be in business... might be room to lash the spars to either side, you'll have to check that on your own. Meh, I have the feeling you're heading in the right direction as far as an inexpensive, viable & legal form of transport goes. I can easily envision your boat riding safely & comfortably in the bed of the truck, the jutting bow supported by the padded extender, line or webbing used for securement, and your red or orange flag tied to the bow handle, LOL. CHEERS!!! :cool:
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Hey Ghost Rider, I have seen those on E-bay and think they are rated to 700 lbs-if I remember correctly. Now that I dropped all this cash on the boat I'm kinda poor so want to transport it cheap. Those extenders are not too expensive though and with some of your suggestions, may work quite well. Gonna look at the Erickson right now. Cam on Bodega Bay huh? Maybe, my friend, maybe....
I copy the "kinda poor" number, been there, done that at times in my life... and I don't like giving the gubmint any more than I already do in fees & taxes, LOL. I think that's your solution, something like that Erickson extender, it looks like it can handle the job and still do it safely. With the right padding taped or otherwise wrapped around that crossbar, you'd be in business... might be room to lash the spars to either side, you'll have to check that on your own. Meh, I have the feeling you're heading in the right direction as far as an inexpensive, viable & legal form of transport goes. I can easily envision your boat riding safely & comfortably in the bed of the truck, the jutting bow supported by the padded extender, line or webbing used for securement, and your red or orange flag tied to the bow handle, LOL. CHEERS!!! :cool:
Just looked at Erickson Extender Senior-400 lb load and more options than junior. I am really liking that for $72.00 at Home Depot! I think you're right-this is the way to go- I can probably make this work by myself and modify it as you indicated to keep the new rig clean and shiny-deck down. The ad even had a picture of a truck like mine with a sailboat in the back, Thanks for that advice...
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
De nada, my friend, glad to be of help... I'm usually pretty good at finding cheap yet workable & safe solutions for transporting boats, dirt bikes, etc. Like I said, I don't like coughing up any more fees than absolutely necessary, I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth, 10-4? My huge family is military: for military, read POOR, even the freakin' O-grade personnel, LOL... more's the pity. But you're right, I think you can make this work and save yourself the hassle of trailering, though you will get some PT hoisting the boat... get that big ol' burly Marine to help ya, he knows all about PT, LOL. You can always trade off as he learns to sail, aye? And don't forget that dolly!!! CHEERS!!! :cool:

P.S. And now, a flashback to my Infantry daze: "PREPARE TO EXERCISE!!! READY!!! EXERCISE!!!" :eek:

LOL... nowadays, my exercise consists primarily of 12-oz. curls, when I'm not beating myself to death on a skateboard or dirt bike. ;)
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
De nada, my friend, glad to be of help... I'm usually pretty good at finding cheap yet workable & safe solutions for transporting boats, dirt bikes, etc. Like I said, I don't like coughing up any more fees than absolutely necessary, I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth, 10-4? My huge family is military: for military, read POOR, even the freakin' O-grade personnel, LOL... more's the pity. But you're right, I think you can make this work and save yourself the hassle of trailering, though you will get some PT hoisting the boat... get that big ol' burly Marine to help ya, he knows all about PT, LOL. You can always trade off as he learns to sail, aye? And don't forget that dolly!!! CHEERS!!! :cool:

P.S. And now, a flashback to my Infantry daze: "PREPARE TO EXERCISE!!! READY!!! EXERCISE!!!" :eek:

LOL... nowadays, my exercise consists primarily of 12-oz. curls, when I'm not beating myself to death on a skateboard or dirt bike. ;)
I've been getting back in to better shape and lifting weights knowing I may be moving this boat. Also the Silver Sodas on occasion... Gotta look into the dimensions of these bed extenders as the SF is 49" wide. Me and the Marine may take this thing out on Friday. I'll post pics... and change my Avatar. This is a great forum as there is a lot I don't know and many here who do-Thanks to all again!
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
B4 I sign off for good and watch a movie on the 65" curved screen, just remember: you may be able to load the boat into the cargo bed of the truck, prop it up a bit with pool noodles, a roll of closed cell foam (sleeping pad from WallyWorld), whatever it takes to raise it a bit so you can then slide the extender into the hitch receiver... once that is done, you can lower the boat into place on the padded crossbar, AYE??? There's more than one way to skin a cat when it comes to this small craft transpo' bidness... uh-oh, my Ebonics are showing after a few beers, LOL. And I'm actually a cat lover, according to the Oriental Zodiac I was born in the "Year of the Tiger"---got two ornery kittehs who share my life, had a third but the poor little gal died an untimely & tragic death earlier this year. I buried her in the forest the next day, in a beautiful spot so if her spirit decides to roam, she'll be in paradise. Alright, I'm outta here, just glad to see you work out a solution to get that primo new Fish down to the water, WOOHOO!!! :cool:
 

Charles Howard

Active Member
I have seen a person with a homemade rack in the back of a small pickup truck. He keeps his boat on the dolly and slides it into the track on the rack with the gate down. The boat hangs out the back. He keeps the rig on the boat with a cover. He is the first to unload and load all single handed. The boat is well supported on the dolly. Really nice setup.
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
I have seen a person with a homemade rack in the back of a small pickup truck. He keeps his boat on the dolly and slides it into the track on the rack with the gate down. The boat hangs out the back. He keeps the rig on the boat with a cover. He is the first to unload and load all single handed. The boat is well supported on the dolly. Really nice setup.
Hi Charles, I like this idea and may eventually build something along those lines. The commercial dollies are expensive and I think a it would not be too difficult to construct something out of PVC and wood. I'm thinking of buying one of those bed extenders until I come up with something better. I want to take it out tomorrow but if I'm not sure about moving it, I'll wait until I get something secure-don't want to damage my new boat...
 
Just a suggestion I use a jetskit trailer for my boats. Picked it up used on Craigslist for $400. The registration for it is like 15 bucks a year here in NY not sure where you're located. I'd hate to see your brand new boat get all scratched up trying to get it in the back of your pick up truck been there done that.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Oh dear Lord don't let Marines near your boat, look what happened to the poor Skipper. Don't tell him to secure it or he will call in a coordinated strike of naval surface fires, artillery and air. We are good a lifting things though. I do suggest putting a red tab on his hat, and tell him that the water should never be above the red tab. just from my 20 year experience in the Corps :)

Transport however you want, on the side is an option as well. The important part is to properly support and cushion the hull. Supports should go under where the fiberglass is doubled up or thickened, like along the keel, under mast steps and daggerboard trunks, bottom of cockpit or across the cockpit rim. And they should be cushioned with cushiony stuff like snow leopard undercoat. Don't strap down too tight, the ratchet straps can bust cockpit edges of drive supports through the hull.

We did have a guy buy a Sunfish from it and load it on the rack that went over the cab of his truck, his windsurfer rack. It would ride great up there but it was UP THERE, over my head.

Seems racers like hull up to avoid chips and dings, etc...For us and our crunchy boats that is just one more step to have to flip the hull over, once going on and once coming off, additional opportunities to damage things, like people and parts. It will be interesting to see if you could develop a "right on" system where you put the boat on a dolly, put a light strap on it and slide the dolly and boat up onto the pickup bed in a slide rack system. It might also be good to figure out a lightweight LED light bar to strap across the stern of the boat.

Cheers
Kent and Skipper
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
That LED bar could also be mounted on the back of the truck cab, just to provide lighting when ya need to load or unload after dark... or if ya need extra light when ya go camping. :rolleyes:
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I'm not sure about the load laws, I believe here in Florida that the load can be no further than 4 feet back from the LIGHTS...so if the lights move back....hmmm...
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Oh dear Lord don't let Marines near your boat, look what happened to the poor Skipper. Don't tell him to secure it or he will call in a coordinated strike of naval surface fires, artillery and air. We are good a lifting things though. I do suggest putting a red tab on his hat, and tell him that the water should never be above the red tab. just from my 20 year experience in the Corps :)

Transport however you want, on the side is an option as well. The important part is to properly support and cushion the hull. Supports should go under where the fiberglass is doubled up or thickened, like along the keel, under mast steps and daggerboard trunks, bottom of cockpit or across the cockpit rim. And they should be cushioned with cushiony stuff like snow leopard undercoat. Don't strap down too tight, the ratchet straps can bust cockpit edges of drive supports through the hull.

We did have a guy buy a Sunfish from it and load it on the rack that went over the cab of his truck, his windsurfer rack. It would ride great up there but it was UP THERE, over my head.

Seems racers like hull up to avoid chips and dings, etc...For us and our crunchy boats that is just one more step to have to flip the hull over, once going on and once coming off, additional opportunities to damage things, like people and parts. It will be interesting to see if you could develop a "right on" system where you put the boat on a dolly, put a light strap on it and slide the dolly and boat up onto the pickup bed in a slide rack system. It might also be good to figure out a lightweight LED light bar to strap across the stern of the boat.

Cheers
Kent and Skipper
Thank you Kent and Skipper,
My son in law (the Marine) is coming over in the morning. I'm thinking of blowing up an air mattress as well as supporting the hull with old blankets, foam etc...I have numerous tie downs, bungees and rope so I will use such to support and tie in the boat to relieve any pressure from transport. Mickey Mouse, but not for long. If it doesn't seem solid, I'll wait until I get a better rig. A versatile dolly, that can be securely tied in to the truck bed and be pulled out to take the boat to the water would be a great build. I think I can build one and was out back today considering how. If I cut templates (2x6) for the angle width of the bottom of the hull, I can make 4 supports and run 1x4 's lengthwise with cushion to create a cradle and support the underside. The whole frame would be triangular with two big wheels at the wide end and a smaller wheel in front. Got to figure out how to move this thing solo...may need a trailer at some point,
we'll see!
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Just a suggestion I use a jetskit trailer for my boats. Picked it up used on Craigslist for $400. The registration for it is like 15 bucks a year here in NY not sure where you're located. I'd hate to see your brand new boat get all scratched up trying to get it in the back of your pick up truck been there done that.
May get a trailer but I'm on a busy street and it's hard to maneuver into my driveway. Been thinkin the same-I'm gonna beat the new boat up if I'm not careful-love that pic by the way, can see the daggerboard under the water-cool!
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
May get a trailer but I'm on a busy street and it's hard to maneuver into my driveway. Been thinkin the same-I'm gonna beat the new boat up if I'm not careful-love that pic by the way, can see the daggerboard under the water-cool!
I'm not sure about the load laws, I believe here in Florida that the load can be no further than 4 feet back from the LIGHTS...so if the lights move back....hmmm...
I need to look into this too. My understanding is that anything over 4 feet needs a red flag here in California. That's how it used to be when I worked in the lumber yard back in the 80's!
 

sailcraftri

Well-Known Member
I transport deck up in the bed of my truck which is 6.4 ft plus tailgate length. I don't need the bed extender even though I bought one off Craigslist for $40. I put stern in first and support hull with pool noodles. I tie of the stern each side from traveler eye straps which keeps boat straight. Then run rope from truck hook through bow handle then back to truck. If traveling long distance I'll add a rope from bumper over deck to bumper on other side. Sail/spars fit nicely under boat or on top inside spar bag. I can even close my tonneau cover. I have a Silverado now but this even worked when I had a Mazda B2500 with 6 ft bed.

The center of gravity of the boat is over the tailgate so it will not tip out.

I have a tall daggerboard slot dolly which allows me to put the hull into the bed without lifting.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
My first Sunfish, enjoying its only pickup-truck ride from Florida to New Hampshire. :)

The load was kind of overdone, as I'd hooked a yard sale stainless-steel shroud to the front bumper, ran it through a bolt at the gudgeon, down through the daggerboard trunk, and to a pulley system—where I could adjust the downward tension through the truck's pass-through window while driving. The adjustment contraption ended at the Sunfish's relocated swivel block, mounted on the passenger-side upright. The cam cleat held the tension. (The rack was all reclaimed lumber, and has since been replaced).

It gets worse :rolleyes:. I'd run a cable twice under the forward deck, supporting a 5/4" board, and a bolt-tensioner (sticking out to the right) to match the board's bend to the deck.

Loading was aided by a stepladder, which supported the bow handle while I, SOLO :eek:, lifted the stern to the wooden support "mid-truck". A pad was placed above the cab in case of a shift in load. The green line was attached to the tailgate, as a sudden loss of the load forward could be disastrous to the car's rear occupants ahead. :oops: Transported backwards, repurposed tennis balls supported the Sunfish's bow (at the rear of the truck).

In the same manner last season, I transported a recent 1971 Sunfish "buy"—but from New Hampshire to Florida. Fortunately, in the absence of the seller, a young neighbor-lady helped load it, as I don't "do" SOLO any longer. :(

Rear view, first Sunfish car-topping:

SunfishMovingB08.jpg

Last season's drive to Florida, with a much relaxed loading:

Fullscreen capture 1062017 72856 AM.bmp.jpg
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
I transport deck up in the bed of my truck which is 6.4 ft plus tailgate length. I don't need the bed extender even though I bought one off Craigslist for $40. I put stern in first and support hull with pool noodles. I tie of the stern each side from traveler eye straps which keeps boat straight. Then run rope from truck hook through bow handle then back to truck. If traveling long distance I'll add a rope from bumper over deck to bumper on other side. Sail/spars fit nicely under boat or on top inside spar bag. I can even close my tonneau cover. I have a Silverado now but this even worked when I had a Mazda B2500 with 6 ft bed.

The center of gravity of the boat is over the tailgate so it will not tip out.

I have a tall daggerboard slot dolly which allows me to put the hull into the bed without lifting.
Thanks for this post!
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Thanks to everyone for their input. My son in law is coming in an hour or so to take this boat on its maiden voyage. We're going to take it to Lake Sonoma I think, which is only about 30 minutes north. If it gets sailing, I'll post pictures.
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Oh dear Lord don't let Marines near your boat, look what happened to the poor Skipper. Don't tell him to secure it or he will call in a coordinated strike of naval surface fires, artillery and air. We are good a lifting things though. I do suggest putting a red tab on his hat, and tell him that the water should never be above the red tab. just from my 20 year experience in the Corps :)

Transport however you want, on the side is an option as well. The important part is to properly support and cushion the hull. Supports should go under where the fiberglass is doubled up or thickened, like along the keel, under mast steps and daggerboard trunks, bottom of cockpit or across the cockpit rim. And they should be cushioned with cushiony stuff like snow leopard undercoat. Don't strap down too tight, the ratchet straps can bust cockpit edges of drive supports through the hull.

We did have a guy buy a Sunfish from it and load it on the rack that went over the cab of his truck, his windsurfer rack. It would ride great up there but it was UP THERE, over my head.

Seems racers like hull up to avoid chips and dings, etc...For us and our crunchy boats that is just one more step to have to flip the hull over, once going on and once coming off, additional opportunities to damage things, like people and parts. It will be interesting to see if you could develop a "right on" system where you put the boat on a dolly, put a light strap on it and slide the dolly and boat up onto the pickup bed in a slide rack system. It might also be good to figure out a lightweight LED light bar to strap across the stern of the boat.

Cheers
Kent and Skipper
Thanks again Kent and Skipper, before I signed out, I wanted to review your post-gonna round up my stuff as the Marine will be here soon!
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
Dang, L&VW, when you say lumber rack, you MEAN lumber rack, LOL. Nice engineering in that archival photo... but, hey, it WORKED!!! ;)

I can no longer do the cartopping thing, I have a permanent shoulder injury which limits how high I can raise my right arm, that's why I sold the Minifish a few months ago, I figure on buying a slightly larger boat on a trailer in the near future. Hiking out had something to do with it as well, I can no longer hike out for hours at a time like I did on all-day excursions in the past... instead I'll buy a boat which isn't quite as tender and rely upon mechanical advantage to give my shoulder a break. The stiff knee isn't really a factor here, that's my OTHER permanent injury, courtesy of a bad wipeout on a dirt bike on Rim Road 300 last year... I was rounding a corner at speed and the bike whipped out from under me, my (unpadded) knee spiking directly into that hard stony ground. Thing blew up to the size of Rhode Island, haven't felt that level of pain in decades, LOL... and the knee will never be the same again, though it is slowly inching back to about 80%. :confused:

Norcalsail, you can do this with the right setup, that dolly only needs to be high enough for you to tilt the stern up and set it on the tailgate, or line it up with whatever system you devise for the cargo bed. In my trucking daze, I occasionally pulled "roller bed" wagons for FedEx, 53' wagons with rollers the length of the floor... using that idea, you can create some sort of loading & unloading system which employs rollers and allows you to shift the boat from the dolly to the cargo bed, and vice versa. Doesn't have to be an elaborate system, as long as the rollers are padded or made of rubber, maybe some similar material so you don't scratch up the hull. Rollers don't have to be huge either, just large enough to get the job done. Charles Howard & Sailcraftri have both mentioned loading systems like this, no reason why you can't devise your own, given your particular circumstances: height of the truck bed or lowered tailgate, dimensions of the truck bed, etc., etc. :rolleyes:

Another good reason for developing such a system is safety: you've mentioned the fact that you live on a busy street, and I can assure you that if you buy a trailer, the time will come when you find yourself trying to back that trailer into your driveway after dark. When I sail, I sail all day, and sometimes I don't make it back to the house till dusk, or even after dark... you want some drunk plowing into your rig as you attempt to back it into the drive? Sounds like trouble, it'd be easier & safer to develop a simple loading system which works specifically for you & your boat, without letting the boat get banged up in the process. It ain't rocket science (see L&VW's post above, LOL), just figure out what will work for you on a repetitive basis, and fine-tune the system till it's smooth & easy... like Swiss clockwork, 10-4? I have faith in ya, I know you can do this, LOL. Later, you'll be thankful you did when you don't have to worry about trailer fees, maintenance, the hassles associated with trailering at a crowded boat ramp, etc., etc. :eek:

YOU'RE STILL ON THE RIGHT TRACK, YOU'LL FIGURE OUT A GOOD SOLUTION SOON ENOUGH... AND THEN IT'S ALL CLEAR SAILING, LOL. :cool:
 
Last edited:

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Well, I had trouble posting these pictures. We put the boat, deck up, on an air mattress and tied it in on many points. Pretty tight but with some give. We did not go to the lake but took it as a practice for tomorrow. Hopefully, the Maiden Voyage will happen in the morning. Lots of overhang and won't go on the 101 but will take the Old Redwood HWY... Showed my son in law you tube vids and gave him the rundown on my sailing knowledge...he'll get it! Sorry about the messy posts...
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Dang, L&VW, when you say lumber rack, you MEAN lumber rack, LOL. Nice engineering in that archival photo... but, hey, it WORKED!!! ;)

I can no longer do the cartopping thing, I have a permanent shoulder injury which limits how high I can raise my right arm, that's why I sold the Minifish a few months ago, I figure on buying a slightly larger boat on a trailer in the near future. Hiking out had something to do with it as well, I can no longer hike out for hours at a time like I did on all-day excursions in the past... instead I'll buy a boat which isn't quite as tender and rely upon mechanical advantage to give my shoulder a break. The stiff knee isn't really a factor here, that's my OTHER permanent injury, courtesy of a bad wipeout on a dirt bike on Rim Road 300 last year... I was rounding a corner at speed and the bike whipped out from under me, my (unpadded) knee spiking directly into that hard stony ground. Thing blew up to the size of Rhode Island, haven't felt that level of pain in decades, LOL... and the knee will never be the same again, though it is slowly inching back to about 80%. :confused:

Norcalsail, you can do this with the right setup, that dolly only needs to be high enough for you to tilt the stern up and set it on the tailgate, or line it up with whatever system you devise for the cargo bed. In my trucking daze, I occasionally pulled "roller bed" wagons for FedEx, 53' wagons with rollers the length of the floor... using that idea, you can create some sort of loading & unloading system which employs rollers and allows you to shift the boat from the dolly to the cargo bed, and vice versa. Doesn't have to be an elaborate system, as long as the rollers are padded or made of rubber, maybe some similar material so you don't scratch up the hull. Rollers don't have to be huge either, just large enough to get the job done. Charles Howard & Sailcraftri have both mentioned loading systems like this, no reason why you can't devise your own, given your particular circumstances: height of the truck bed or lowered tailgate, dimensions of the truck bed, etc., etc. :rolleyes:

Another good reason for developing such a system is safety: you've mentioned the fact that you live on a busy street, and I can assure you that if you buy a trailer, the time will come when you find yourself trying to back that trailer into your driveway after dark. When I sail, I sail all day, and sometimes I don't make it back to the house till dusk, or even after dark... you want some drunk plowing into your rig as you attempt to back it into the drive? Sounds like trouble, it'd be easier & safer to develop a simple loading system which works specifically for you & your boat, without letting the boat get banged up in the process. It ain't rocket science (see L&VW's post above, LOL), just figure out what will work for you on a repetitive basis, and fine-tune the system till it's smooth & easy... like Swiss clockwork, 10-4? I have faith in ya, I know you can do this, LOL. Later, you'll be thankful you did when you don't have to worry about trailer fees, maintenance, the hassles associated with trailering at a crowded boat ramp, etc., etc. :eek:

YOU'RE STILL ON THE RIGHT TRACK, YOU'LL FIGURE OUT A GOOD SOLUTION SOON ENOUGH... AND THEN IT'S ALL CLEAR SAILING, LOL. :cool:
Little by little... the photos make the overhang look even worse. It seemed pretty solid but I did order the Erickson Sr. 400 lb. It will make me feel better to have more support! I may turn it deck down as many folks thought it a better way to move the boat. Kent ,however, did seem to state the boat could be moved safely deck up with proper hull support. Live and learn.
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
Just looking at those pics, I think you should (eventually) ditch the air mattress which might develop a leak anyway, and start thinking about a low cradle of some sort with padded or rubber rollers on it, maybe a combination of padded sections & rollers to keep your boat hull looking good. A poor man's version would use some sorta thick rubber mat and pool noodles, but I reckon a nice low cradle would offer more hull support. Remember Signal Charlie's tip to place crossmembers of that cradle under reinforced sections such as the mast step & cockpit... put other crossmembers fore & aft if you wish, I probably would, this won't be some big bulky cradle, just a low wooden affair in the cargo bed of your truck. You might line up some rollers to either side of the SF keel and simply "slot" the keel as you load the boat... with additional padding farther to each side for support once the boat is in place. Or you can work out a way to transport the boat topside-down, but still sufficiently padded & protected to prevent dings & scratches. When that Erickson extender arrives, you may have to drill an additional hole or two to put the crossbar exactly where you need it, after you've padded the crossbar. I'm thinking of a system where you load the boat into the low padded (and rollered) cradle, then insert the extender and dial in everything as far as securement goes. You are indeed getting closer to a good workable solution, though the current setup might draw attention from Johnny Law... just sayin', the last thing you need is interaction with revenue collectors, AYE? Takes the fun outta sailing, LOL... :confused:

Edit: Looking at that extender again, maybe you won't need to drill any holes, just pad the crossbar till it supports the hull. That low cradle could be light enough for one guy to lift in & out of the truck bed, and be built back far enough so the edge of the cradle (and the pads & rollers) are right near the edge of the lowered tailgate, making it easy for one guy to load the boat from the dolly to the cradle and vice versa. With a fairly light removable cradle, you could use it when you want to go sailing, then remove it and flip the tailgate up into place for all other purposes. :rolleyes:

Edit #2: Slow this morning, my brain is still warming up, LOL... you could make that cradle just long enough to fit in the truck bed with the tailgate closed, then slide it out near the edge of the lowered tailgate whenever you prepare to load the boat. That way, once the boat is on the beach (or dock), you can return the dolly to the truck and push the cradle in far enough to close the tailgate, that way your cargo bed won't be wide open to Jack the Rip-Off... personally, and this is a holdover from decades spent in Kalifornia, I'd rig some sort of lock and cable to secure the dolly & cradle while you're gone, that way you don't return to find everything MIA, courtesy of some thievin' tard. :eek:
 
Last edited:

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Well, my SIL and I got the boat to Lake Sonoma. I had a great time sailing and am a bit better after reading and researching this site as well as You tube. To the right of this picture is an easy bay and to the left, under the bridge, is the bigger lake with better wind. A bit harsher then my days last July in Wisconsin, much rockier and the reservoir gets deep quick so harder to rig the boat in the water. No other sailboats, just a lot of pontoons, speedboats and jet skis-I weaved in and out of them. Very fun and great day getting a new boat on the water.
 
Top