Power Washer damage

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
#22
I hail from a large military family (seven brothers, one sister, eldest brother deceased), and back in the day we all built models of ships, tanks, planes, you name it. Maybe not my sis, but all my brothers... I probably built a model of that very plane at some point or other, I know I built P-51s, Stukas, Spitfires, Ju-88s, Catalina seaplanes, and a bunch of others I'm not remembering at this moment, LOL. We also built castles, fought wars with soldiers of every stripe including those from the Napoleonic Era, built flying models, launched ships, all that good stuff... models that outlived their usefulness were selected for target practice or explosives training, maybe set on fire as well, LOL. How we all survived the '60s & '70s is still a mystery to me... no eyes put out either, but plenty of scorched fingers & ringing eardrums, AYE??? Meh, live & learn, those were the good old days when messing with this stuff, building tree forts, exploring in the field, etc., were more important than video games, which didn't even exist yet. Sure was fun, and we never missed what had not been invented yet, LOL. Good luck with the canoe, I'm sure you'll make a good job of it, judging by your past work... CHEERS!!! :cool:
 
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norcalsail

Active Member
#23
Well, hopefully we'll see pictures and I have to say that Air Corps Sunfish looks amazing. Would love to see photos of that sailing with your Navy, Signal Charlie. Pretty sure I'm not the only one...
 
Thread starter #24
The rivet nuts (rivnuts) are metal and require a special rivet gun tool. Rivnuts

If most of your rivets are good you could go with a plastic anchor for a few of them, field expedient repair. Don't tell anyone :)

As for the canoe, she'll get a Flying Tigers paint job.
View attachment 28243
I think I should have left the splashguard on! Mine doesn’t have rivets, but stainless pan head screws. There was no evidence of metal rivnuts behind them when I removed the screws, just 2 plastic anchors.
I do have a rivet gun (but not a riv-nut gun) and the proper rivets for reattaching the aluminum trim, but the holes that held the stainless screws to the splashguard are big- too big for the same rivet size, I’m sure.
In another thread it said the rivnut tool plus rivets was $100. I think I’ll skip the tool and try plastic mollies similar to what was there.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#25
I think I should have left the splashguard on! Mine doesn’t have rivets, but stainless pan head screws. There was no evidence of metal rivnuts behind them when I removed the screws, just 2 plastic anchors.
In another thread it said the rivnut tool plus rivets was $100. I think I’ll skip the tool and try plastic mollies similar to what was there.
That "loaner-Sunfish" that became a gift to me from a neighbor? Their boys had knocked the splashguard off—not once, but twice! :eek:

Later, mostly abandoned, I went back to sailing it by reattaching the splashguard with sheet metal screws—after moving the splashguard back
-inch—and drilling new holes. The old holes remained covered by the splashguard. :cool: (Although, with this Sunfish having no inspection ports, I probably should have taped them over).

Seeing that it might get knocked a third time, I didn't caulk the splashguard—and don't think it needs caulking anyway. Even if one should raise the splashguard with washers :confused: very little water gets through, and might even assist in taking "the punch" out of bigger wakes enough to avoid flooding the cockpit.

Here it is, being launched while having to look over a long mound of cured Liquid Nails—some very tough stuff that had to be sanded off. :mad:

How much abuse the sheet metal screws could take is unknown, but my quick-and-dirty splashguard repair survived Hurricane Irma, while the rest of the boat got smooshed!
 

Attachments

#26
The ratchet block on my Laser is mounted with 2 of those #8 stainless wood screws and it hasn't pulled out in 36 years and that has 10 times the load of a splash guard.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#27
I’ve got fairing putty and will hit a couple of spots. Confession: I am NOT priming, just painting with Easypoxy Fire Red. I know many will say “do it right” with primer but it has been my experience that the primer is expensive, time consuming, most is sanded off and the paint sticks just fine without it, especially if I let it ‘bake’ for a couple weeks in the sun afterwards.
I've just stumbled on two types of automotive "glazing putty" I wouldn't hesitate to use today—although both tubes are over 25 years old! :oops: After several years of sailing, it's only where the Sunfish keel has been dragged across a wooden dock that the putty's red coloring was exposed. :cool: As Beldar has stated, it's probably best to leave scratches (or use compound on them), as painting is a maintenance item; whereas, actual sailing should always take precedence.

Surprising to me, "spider-cracks" won't fill in (and do show through). :(

Two of my former Sunfish-racers had gouges and deep "cross-scratches", so taking the time to putty and paint them seemed advisable. The putty has held up well. :)
 

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Thread starter #30
Sheeza looking good! Roll and tip application? Temp applied and any thinner?
Thanks! Temps were in the low 70’s, low humidity and no rain in the forecast. I started with roll and tip but the first coat had lots a little fibers on the deck from the roller. I used just a good quality brush (no roller) for 2nd and 3rd coats. No thinner. The paint leveled out really well. Still need to attach splashguard, add stripes and put aluminum trim back on, then she’s ready for spring sailing! Tucked in the garage now, next to two other Sunfish, a Sailfish and a Minifish (several others must be left outside, unfortunately)
 
Thread starter #32
Thanks, Norcalsail! It’s far from perfect, but I’m very happy with the Pettit paint- it was very forgiving. I don’t think I’ll ever use a roller again, just the brush worked well for me and was much less stressful. I put some good tunes on and got into it!
 
Thread starter #33
I decided it was better to glass over the holes where the splashguard was removed. Originally attached with machine screws, but I’m reattaching with the 3/16 rivets. Thanks to search forum and good advice here I also got proper washers for backing the rivets. Next I will drill out the 3/16th holes. But then, how to hold a tiny washer with your arm in the inspection port under the 3/16” hole while carefully squeezing a rivet gun? Nope, this is a two person job!
Also, I can only reach about 6 of the 13 holes, with flotation blocks under the rest. I will use a dab of TotalBoat Seal under each rivet head and run a bead or two under the splashguard. Am I missing something? Is it OK that outer rivets don’t have backing washers? I know there are other methods.. riv-nuts and my original machine screws, but I thought this method was best, and is advised on sunfishsailor files. Any advise or reassurance before I proceed would be welcome! This is my freshly painted Sunfish, I don’t want to screw this up!
 

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L&VW

Well-Known Member
#35
This wasn't sprayed but brushed? It looks amazing, like brand new... love the red!
I prefer brushing over spraying, as it attracts and removes more mosquitoes from the area. :(

I decided it was better to glass over the holes where the splashguard was removed. Originally attached with machine screws, but I’m reattaching with the 3/16 rivets. Thanks to search forum and good advice here I also got proper washers for backing the rivets. Next I will drill out the 3/16th holes. But then, how to hold a tiny washer with your arm in the inspection port under the 3/16” hole while carefully squeezing a rivet gun? Nope, this is a two person job!

Also, I can only reach about 6 of the 13 holes, with flotation blocks under the rest. I will use a dab of TotalBoat Seal under each rivet head and run a bead or two under the splashguard. Am I missing something? Is it OK that outer rivets don’t have backing washers? I know there are other methods.. riv-nuts and my original machine screws, but I thought this method was best, and is advised on sunfishsailor files. Any advise or reassurance before I proceed would be welcome! This is my freshly painted Sunfish, I don’t want to screw this up!
Ironically, the outer fasteners take most of the strain of heavy-water sailing; worse, the outer fasteners are the first to snag on lines (or lawns during Hurricane Irma).

Where my "borrowed" Sunfish lost its splashguard twice before, I replaced the fasteners with stainless sheet-metal screws—anticipating the splashguard would be ripped-off again: but even Hurricane Irma didn't budge it. :) A few years pass, the boys "graduate" to a Jet-Ski, so my neighbor gave the Sunfish to me. :cool: Especially remarkable, as that hurricane tore at the "rear corners" and knocked them off! :confused: Now that the holes prevent sailing (or even floating), I've since decided to save that Sunfish, rather than part it out. Probably why I've got four spare Sunfish. ;)

One of my ex-racer Sunfish splashguards has pulled out to leave five postage-stamp size holes. :eek: I plan to cut "recovered" fiberglass fragments to shapes that can slide behind those holes then epoxy them under the holes (later, to drill new holes when cured). Because it appears to be a very vulnerable—but important—accessory, metal backers could cause less comfort and more grief! (Unless metal backers was my earlier suggestion! :confused: )

Open question:
Pop-rivets / sheet metal screws: How about nylon, fiberglass, or fiber washers for backers?

.
 
#37
Sure it's okay... sometimes a rivet is useful in a location where ya just can't reach the back side, not without cutting glass and perhaps installing an inspection port. Just go with your plan as stated, if you do the rivets right they should be nice and tight. I had to pop-rivet an engraved number plate over the existing hull number of my Minifish, as directed by the CA DMV when I had no paperwork for the craft and I registered it as a "home-built" boat, and there was no way to access the inside of the hull without tearing into the stern of the boat. No worries, I just used a drill bit with the exact same diameter of the rivets, used a little sealant on each hole between the hull and engraved plate, and the boat never leaked once, despite the fact that the plate was often underwater in heavy surface chop. Honestly, in this sort of situation, I think a good solid rivet placement is more important than anything else, I have a pretty good rivet gun and I use both hands to hold the gun at the correct angle and get a good blast, so to speak. Caulk or sealant doesn't hurt, but the rivet itself needs to be good and tight, and absolutely solid as far as placement goes. Just my $.02, aye? CHEERS!!! :rolleyes:

P.S. I dig the brush job on the boat, I've always maintained that a boat can look good even if it's painted by hand, the results depend mainly upon prep work and conditions such as zero wind, low humidity, favorable temperature, etc. Nice job!!! :cool:
 
#38
Oh, yeah, forgot to address the Galloping Horse criteria and the 50-foot rule, LOL. Friend o' mine in high school was a male chauvinist pig, and he'd occasionally rate some gal's looks by saying she was 50-50, which meant she looked good at 50 meters or 50 miles per hour. :confused:
 

mixmkr

Active Member
#39
A bead of 3M 5200 would hold well but be difficult to remove in the future. 4200 is a compromise on the adhesive qualities and would probably be a good solution along the entire underside....neatly of course.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#40
We have not come across washers on factory installations, just small bits of sealant, so why add washers? What we do is add a small blob of sealant around the rivet hole on the deck and insert the rivet through that. Assuming you have the proper factory spec, closed end aluminum rivet you should get zero to little leakage through the rivet holes, and if you do, you have that fine deck port to reach in and sponge anything out.

We also squirt a small dab of sealant into the rivet barrel after the mandrel has popped. Speaking of the mandrel popping, we suggest putting a soft towel down around the work area, the rivet gun has a tendency to buck when the mandrel snaps, and the head of the gun can fall down and scratch your beautifully painted deck.

Scout coaming rivet.jpg
 
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