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Mid 70s 470

Pierson

New Member
Hey everyone. Im hoping this thread gains some traction and people respond.

I am a high school sailer in New York and I just bought a mid 70s 470 sail number 510. Im not sure exactly what year its from but I'm thinking after 1973 but before 1980.

Does anyone know if there was a lot of 470 racing in New York back when the class was big? I only know of 2 470s in New York State.

While I have a good idea of what everything is for there are a few things which are a bit confusing. Can anyone point me in the right direction in the best way to rig this? Every boat from this era looks a little bit different and that's kind of why its difficult to pinpoint a year. I don't want to give it a complete overhaul but I would like to update some things. Just to make it work well and go as fast as possible.
What can you guys tell me about it?

Where do I cleat the jib halyard? There used to be a magic box on the mast but I don't see any where to cleat it on the mast. Was it led back somewhere?

On both tanks there is a harken 29mm block that lines up with the roller on the centerboard trunk but it is turned horizontally. It would make sense to put a cleat for the Cunningham there but the block is in the wrong orientation and it looks like there is a horn cleat on the mast for that. What is that block there for? How would the Cunningham be rigged as the boat is?

The boat needs spinnaker hardware but I have the spinnaker from this boat (its all purple) and a spin pole from another boat that would probably work. Did this boat originally have spinnaker rigging on it? Why would it be taken off and not replaced with new stuff? It looks to me like there are holes for where some spin hardware might have been.

The trapeze has been rigged with Murray ball and socket stuff. It feels cheap and the receiver (which I don't have) to go on the harness itself is 150$. To me this is an absurd price for something which isn't universal to all trapeze harnesses so I'm probably going to take it off and put standard stuff on like you would see on any c420 or Hobie or anything. Good plan or is the Murray stuff better? What was original to the boat?

The gooseneck goes into a track on the mast but there is nothing keeping it from falling out the bottom. Will it stay on the mast when the sails are up? There are a bunch of holes drilled in that area. If anyone responds I can send pictures.

In the pictures you might be able to see on the starboard side there is a block on the floor just behind the centerboard trunk. What does that do? Under the combing of the centerboard trunk there is a block hanging under 2 silver screws which you can see on the top of the centerboard trunk are these 2 blocks related? What do they do? it looks like it might work as a purchase for the downhaul for spin pole or maybe its part of the jib hallyard system?

Is the shoelace stitching on the gunwale original? I think it is based on other pictures I've seen.

There is a soft spot on the starboard side tank just behind the shroud chainplate. What is the best way to fix this?

As I peel back the layers of history of this boat its cool to see what each owners contribution was. Each modification dates its self. Various fittings have been taken off over the years( whether they were replaced or not) and I'm getting a better idea of what everything was there for.

Thank you all. I can send more pictures if needed
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LaLi

Well-Known Member
Hi Pierson,

just a short note before I delve into the details :D

The number US 510 points to the early 1970s, maybe '72. The boat looks somewhat newer though, so that main isn't necessarily originally from that boat. Does the Vanguard sticker/plaque next to the IYRU plaque say anything significant?

Lots of relevant information is already posted in these threads:

470 Layout
470 Questions

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LaLi

Well-Known Member
Where do I cleat the jib halyard? There used to be a magic box on the mast but I don't see any where to cleat it on the mast. Was it led back somewhere?
The jib halyard cleats traditionally on the top of the centreboard case in front of the traveller.
Magic boxes disappeared from all boats pretty soon after the 1970s as people realized that you had less friction with regular blocks. A typical multi-block system today would be a 12:1 but you can get away with less.

On both tanks there is a harken 29mm block that lines up with the roller on the centerboard trunk but it is turned horizontally. It would make sense to put a cleat for the Cunningham there but the block is in the wrong orientation and it looks like there is a horn cleat on the mast for that. What is that block there for? How would the Cunningham be rigged as the boat is?
Those blocks are most likely spinnaker sheet turning blocks. The only thing a horn cleat on the mast would be good for is the main halyard. The main cunningham can of course be double-ended, but I wouldn't bother with that; a single cleat on top of the centreboard case is good enough.

The boat needs spinnaker hardware but I have the spinnaker from this boat (its all purple) and a spin pole from another boat that would probably work. Did this boat originally have spinnaker rigging on it? Why would it be taken off and not replaced with new stuff? It looks to me like there are holes for where some spin hardware might have been.
What other boat is the spinnaker pole from? Your boat actually does have at least some spinnaker hardware, so it very likely had all of it. I believe Vanguard didn't sell spinnakerless 470s. Over the years, I've seen people remove perfectly good systems and replace them with something crappy, or nothing. It's a mystery :confused:

The trapeze has been rigged with Murray ball and socket stuff. It feels cheap and the receiver (which I don't have) to go on the harness itself is 150$. To me this is an absurd price for something which isn't universal to all trapeze harnesses so I'm probably going to take it off and put standard stuff on like you would see on any c420 or Hobie or anything. Good plan or is the Murray stuff better? What was original to the boat?
I believe the ball-socket harness plate is made of carbon fibre, so it's no wonder if it costs almost as much as a Laser tiller. It's inherently safer, but "normal" stainless rings + hook aren't likely to kill you, either. And those were what your boat originally had, plus handles that are very likely way too low.

The gooseneck goes into a track on the mast but there is nothing keeping it from falling out the bottom. Will it stay on the mast when the sails are up? There are a bunch of holes drilled in that area. If anyone responds I can send pictures.
The main and the boom will hold it on the mast but it shouldn't run up and down. You'll need a long tape measure (for which you'll have later use, too) and a riveter for this.

In the pictures you might be able to see on the starboard side there is a block on the floor just behind the centerboard trunk. What does that do? Under the combing of the centerboard trunk there is a block hanging under 2 silver screws which you can see on the top of the centerboard trunk are these 2 blocks related? What do they do? it looks like it might work as a purchase for the downhaul for spin pole or maybe its part of the jib hallyard system?
That could be anything. The blocks "inside" the top of the centreboard case aren't likely related to it. The spinnaker pole downhaul doesn't need a purchase, but it could be a turning block for the tail of the jib halyard adjustment. There should be a cleat somewhere in front of it, though,

Is the shoelace stitching on the gunwale original? I think it is based on other pictures I've seen.
It could, I am not sure when the practice started. Vanguard didn't do it, but it could still have been done by the original owner. Anyway, it's pretty neat and working, although I would add some non-slip material on the side decks.

There is a soft spot on the starboard side tank just behind the shroud chainplate. What is the best way to fix this?
If that's the only soft spot then the hull is incredibly stiff :D Unless there's a real risk of puncture, I wouldn't do a thing.

I'll blow up the pictures later today to see if there are any other interesting things visible (usually there are) :cool:

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LaLi

Well-Known Member
Ok, let's go through the pictures...

Number 2: The Clamcleat is quite unusually placed; not the original way the centreboard uphaul was rigged.

3: Here you can see some of the (actual) 70s-typical centreboard adjustment system, with the cam cleats at the aft end of the case. Except that there are two through fairleads here, which indicates that some later owner didn't quite understand how this works (there's supposed to be only one uphaul line that comes through the port fairlead and cleats on either cleat). These cleats may have been repurposed for other systems.

4: The hiking straps obviously need some elastic lines to hold them up. The crew's straps are only in the way and should be removed.
The cleat at the extreme left is for the spinnaker halyard. Yes, you need to step on it to cleat it!

5: There's been a small cam cleat and a big Clamcleat here. For spinnaker guy and jibsheet, respectively, I guess.

6: These holes are a mystery! The ones on the left make sense for a guy hook/cleat, but there shouldn't be anything else on the foredeck. (Except jib cunningham fittings, but that's post-2000 equipment.)

7: Interesting chainplate with four holes. You have to measure which hole you can actually use for the shroud (I'll link to the class rules later, if you haven't found them yet). Also, it's not a good idea to have the trapeze elastic attached at the same place; you want to separate it from the shroud. The edge of the curved part of the side deck is a much better place.

8: The horn cleat on the mast makes no sense as the main halyard obviously locks on the hook that's visible in picture 3.
The trapeze system looks like it's rigged catamaran-style with the elastic pulling up instead of in. The handles are ok, but the wires are probably too long - you have to pull them tight along the mast to check that. No height adjustment either, so you have to rebuild the system anyway. The choice between the balls or rings is a separate issue, though.

12: The differing colour and the generally fresher appearance of the centreboard case top makes one think that the whole piece is a later replacement. The same goes for the centreboard itself, as I believe that Vanguard used exclusively wood for the foils at the time that the hull was built (what does the rudder look like?).
The angle/location of the vang cleats indicate that the line is supposed to go there directly from the centreboard case. That makes the other block(s) next to the traveller even more mysterious.

The whole boat looks like previous owners haven't always had a clue how a 470 works, and so they have added and deleted equipment in rather nonsensical ways. This is typical, but don't worry, it all looks totally fixable.

More pictures please! I'd like to see the mast step area, the mast gate area, the vang system, the underside of the centreboard case top...

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Pierson

New Member
Wow that was quick! I'll try to send some more pictures today. Thank you for taking so much time. I think I have seen you reply on other 470 forums like the layout and questions ones.

I think the boat was probably raced by the first owner or 2 but then the owners after that did not race it. You can only make the boat slower!

The centerboard and rudder are pretty much perfect, which would make sense if they were put on later. The rudder is fiberglass with no cutouts on the rudder head. Kinda looks like a big laser rudder. The tiller is wood with 2 plastic cleats for an up haul and down haul. Its got what presumably is the original tiller extension with metal universal joint.

The IYRU plaque says the serial number is 4978. So should I assume 78 is the year of the boat? and 49 being the number boat made in 78?

Wow you're good, the trapeze elastic is from a catamaran! I took it off and I'm gonna remount it where the new boats have it. Who ever put it on the boat didn't even bother to cut it to the right length...

The spinnaker pole I have is for an Oday daysailer. Its about 6'-6'4".

The vang that the boat came with is completely insufficient for the boat. Its one of the old style laser vangs jerry rigged to work on the 470. The old laser vangs weren't even enough for the laser so why they put one of those on this boat is just amazingly stupid.

The soft spot is the only soft spot and at most is about 8-10 inches in diameter. When I sit on it it will dip in a bit. I don't want to step or fall on it and end up putting my elbow through the hull. Other than that its the only structural issue other than the holes from old fittings.

So with your seemingly expert opinion, how would you rig the boat as it is. What would you put on and move and replace....How exactly would you run and cleat things? I plan on trying to sand some of the big scratches down and make the holes that I can't put finings over a little less visible. Maybe bring some of the color back too... well see.

Thanks again!
 
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US 1214

Member
Was red a common color for early hulls? I’ve got a red 1974 in upstate as well, frankly I’m surprised there’s two of the same vintage in the same area. Have fun! 7E3B8FF1-0FA2-45D6-9016-78A2D3C95535.jpeg
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
Was red a common color for early hulls?
Yes, and bright yellow, and turquoise, etc. Actually boats of all classes used to be more "colourful" back in the day. Evolution has led most new hulls to be all-white or pale grey, which sure is practical but boring. A fun fact is that 470 class rules don't require the bottom to be white anymore, but it's still unlikely we'll see anything else in the future.

By the way, you guys (Ryan and Pierson) should get together as you're so close to one another, if not for else than buying boat parts (such as spinnaker bags :rolleyes: ).

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LaLi

Well-Known Member
The rudder is fiberglass with no cutouts on the rudder head. Kinda looks like a big laser rudder. The tiller is wood with 2 plastic cleats for an up haul and down haul. Its got what presumably is the original tiller extension with metal universal joint.
Except for the blade itself, sounds like original equipment from no later than 1973.

The IYRU plaque says the serial number is 4978. So should I assume 78 is the year of the boat? and 49 being the number boat made in 78?
No, the number only means that it's the 4978th plaque given by IYRU, and that the boat is (about) the 4978th 470 built since the class became international.

The spinnaker pole I have is for an Oday daysailer. Its about 6'-6'4".
Probably close enough. The max length of the 470 pole is 1900 mm.

The vang that the boat came with is completely insufficient for the boat. Its one of the old style laser vangs jerry rigged to work on the 470. The old laser vangs weren't even enough for the laser so why they put one of those on this boat is just amazingly stupid.
Actually the Laser needs more vang tension than the 470, as it's got a una rig which needs more leech tension, and there's nothing to pre-bend the mast, either. The reason why a Laser-style (=mast-cleated) vang doesn't work on a 470 is that you can't reach it from a hiking position. It's the only control system that I would lead to the side tanks even on a strictly recreational boat. The standard purchase is 16:1, but 12:1 is definitely enough.

The soft spot is the only soft spot and at most is about 8-10 inches in diameter. When I sit on it it will dip in a bit. I don't want to step or fall on it and end up putting my elbow through the hull.
If there is (and it looks like there is) an inspection port through which you can reach that spot, you can feel it from the other side. If it's a case of a loose or broken stringer, a little fibreglass should fix it.

how would you rig the boat as it is. What would you put on and move and replace....How exactly would you run and cleat things?
This could turn into a very long answer :D But if I were you, I'd prioritize things as follows:

1. To set up and tune the rig properly, you need a working jib halyard tensioning system, and a system for deck-level mast bend adjustment (a mast puller, or chocks).
2. To actually sail the boat, you need jib cleats.
3. To sail the boat in anything but light air, you need a working trapeze system.
4. To not turn the centreboard case into a water fountain, you need reasonably fresh centreboard flaps at the bottom edge of the case opening.
5. As mentioned, a working vang is pretty important.
6. To use the spinnaker, you need all the equipment required for that, including spinnaker bags.

Everything else is really fine-tuning... and we can talk about the details endlessly. It's going to be another long thread :D

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US 1214

Member
centreboard flaps
Ah yes “water fountain.” Frankly we didn’t check to see if there was a gasket first out. “Water fountain” doesn’t quite sum up the amount of water that entered the boat. I fixed this with some aluminum strips, stainless screws and some gasket material (I followed the older style flaps but there are probably more conventional methods). Problem solved in an afternoon and maybe $12.
 

Pierson

New Member
Sounds like a new gasket should be high on the list! I wasn't so sure at first since not much really comes in on a 420.
I took some better pictures of the boat. Of course this raised even more questions.
What does a mast puller do? I've never heard of them until I started researching 470s. Something to do with prebend

The the one with my hand in it is where the soft spot is.

There is a picture of a Dacron halyard bag thing. Is that what they used for a spinnaker bag?

There is a piece of rope with an 8 knot loop in the middle, and a bowline with a carabiner on one end. What does this do?

All the way forward in the boat there are some fairleads which are half riveted and half screwed. Why half rivet and half screw? What are they for?

It looks like on the mast there was once a magic box. These are hard to come by now but I might be able to get one.

On the mast partner there are 2 holes on either side of where the mast slides in. What was screwed in there.

What should go on the chainplates at the mast step.

On the top of the centerboard trunk there are three empty holes in a triangle it looks like. Were these for a compass?

On the transom there are holes for where some spinnaker blocks might have been. They are in the same place as


Every time I look at the boat I see a new empty hole!
 

US 1214

Member
If your talking about the RYC Club 420s, they do in fact have gaskets - just not great ones (probably due to the way they are beached after racing). A centerboard gasket is a must! (... or a red pool noodle stuffed in the centerboard slot for a little while :cool:).

Is there a port near the soft spot on the hull? If you think that it’s soft enough to puncture through the hull, glassing isn’t a big deal.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
What does a mast puller do?
A mast puller is a system that adjusts mast bend by pulling the spar aft or forward at the deck level. On the 470, they almost always consist of a simple piece of wire and/or rope that is attached to the mast gate, wraps a half turn around the mast and cleats on the opposite side. (Current class rules actually allow for more elaborate setups, but I haven't seen anyone exploit this yet.)
An aft puller is important because it restricts how much the vang bends the lower mast. The vang doesn't really work upwind without it.
A forward puller can be used to induce pre-pend in light air. Can easily do without one.
Mast chocks - pieces of nylon or plywood (or any material really) wedged in front of the mast - can be used instead of an aft puller.

There is a picture of a Dacron halyard bag thing. Is that what they used for a spinnaker bag?
It's quite possible that the big cavity in front of the mast was used as spinnaker storage area, and and it was closed off with that piece of cloth.
This is an example of equipment that sort-of worked back in the day, but would be smarter to replace with a contemporary setup.

There is a piece of rope with an 8 knot loop in the middle, and a bowline with a carabiner on one end. What does this do?
No idea. More often than not, old boats have accumulated equipment for which there is no actual use. (Strange pieces of rope with strange knots are actually typical.)

All the way forward in the boat there are some fairleads which are half riveted and half screwed. Why half rivet and half screw? What are they for?
The rivets are probably original and the screws are a later replacement. The aforementioned spinnaker "bag" quite possibly attached here.
(By the way, I think riveting in fibreglass should be outlawed in general.)

It looks like on the mast there was once a magic box. These are hard to come by now but I might be able to get one.
You didn't read my post #3 :rolleyes: Repeat, magic boxes are obsolete and should be replaced with "normal" block-and-tackle systems. A 12:1 is fairly standard, but even a 420-style 6:1 will work.

On the mast partner there are 2 holes on either side of where the mast slides in. What was screwed in there.
I first thought these were for spinnaker bag attachments, but I believe there's been a mast gate lock there. Which is both useless and now-illegal, so you can forget it.

What should go on the chainplates at the mast step.
Another good question. On your boat, the only thing that definitely comes from that direction is the spinnaker pole uphaul (maybe downhaul, too, if it's external). Could use them to lead anything, trapeze elastics for example.

On the top of the centerboard trunk there are three empty holes in a triangle it looks like. Were these for a compass?
Quite possibly. Would make sense as they're equidistant from one another, and that was a common compass location at the time. Later in the 1970s, people started using dual compasses, one at each forward end of the sidetanks. Nowadays everybody has a single compass on the mast between the boom and the deck.

I'll comment on the new batch of pictures later today again...

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LaLi

Well-Known Member
Picture 15 (and 50): The interesting thing here is really the location of the mast step. On another Vanguard of roughly similar vintage (the green boat in the "470 Layout" thread) the step was clearly farther forward - and the mast was still too far back in the "middle" position! Yours has obviously been moved... and you may very well need to move it back. But you have to measure it first.

16: So this is looking forward on the starboard side? What is the flotation made of, and how is it fastened? Does it extend to the area that may need repairing?

23: Ok, it's clear now that the five corners of this piece of cloth are supposed to be attached to the eyestraps on the edge of the big "hollow" in front of the mast, visible in many pictures.

24: My guess is that there's been a sideways jib lead system here. Whoever removed it was indeed right in that it's not needed!

25 (and 34 and 48): Nice classic wooden tiller, with Clamcleats for rudder up- and downhaul... but what is that V-cleat doing there near the extension swivel?

26: Hard to say why one rivet has been changed to a screw. The "empty" rivets are more interesting: is there something fastened to the laminate inside the forward tank?

27: Ok, so the rudder blade isn't original, as it doesn't fit in the head quite right. The leading edge should be parallel to (the extension of) the forward edge of the head. You may need to drill a new hole in the foil or the head, and do some measuring first. Some fibreglass work also is needed at the front corner of the blade.

31: This line of blocks didn't exist until the 1980s, so some previous owner did install at least two rivets! But the purpose is a mystery as this location makes no sense.

33 (and 41): Is there a similar block on the other side under the cap?

42: Ok, so the yellow line holds the sliding gooseneck in place, more or less. You would achieve a better result more permanently with small screws/bolts both above and below the fitting. The exact location has to be measured pretty accurately. I'll read the class rules carefully (and link to them) when the time is right.

52: Yes... it looks a little tired.

(Note: my home internet connection crashed last night and probably won't be back until next week. Having to rely on my phone will limit my posting somewhat.)

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US 1214

Member
Pic 52, is that the original aluminum strips used for the slot gasket? It looks like your boats seen some salt water if the aluminum is that corroded, which may mean your boats seen the east coast.
 

Pierson

New Member
15: Would the measurements be in a tuning guide? 470 website? I plan on trying to get all of the measurements as close as I can to what the tuning guides say.

16: This is looking forward on the starboard side tank from the farthest aft service port. I'll have to go look again to see what the floatation is but it looked like fiberglass. It is probably foam glued in somehow. I think it does extend in to the soft spot.

25: I think Im going to revarnish the tiller to make it look a little better and hopefully seal some of the slight separations. I was thinking that the added cleat was for some sort of auto steering but I don think there is anything that it could hold... I think we have another mystery fitting.

26: I thought at first that maybe it came like that and it was used to easily put thinks on and off of the fairleads without disconnecting the from the boat but that wouldn't really make any sense because you could always tie or shackle something on and you wouldn't have to worry about a screw coming loose..... at least I know that the halyard/ spinnaker holder thing is supposed to go there.

27: If it ain't broke don't fix it but maybe if I take it apart and file some of the fiberglass out it would go parallel. If I have to drill a hole that can't be the end of the world. It seems like this wouldn't really impact the flow that much or would it? I don't know.

31: Those harken 29 blocks are all over this boat it seems like and most look brand new. There are no scratches or fading on them and the rivets are shiny. They seem a little to big in some places.
The sideways block might make sense if it was lower like where the spin ratchets usually are but its right up with the other one. Should I drill out the rivets and put it the other way? It's like this on both sides.

33: There isn't another block on the other side. There is a block on the floor mounted at an angle just behind the trunk on the starboard side. Not entirely sure what either of them do.

42: I put the yellow line there so the gooseneck wouldn't come off. There are a bunch of holes drilled in that area that you can't see because they are either out of frame and higher up on the mast or are covered up by the gooseneck. I saw similar holes in another forum on the same type of mast. I think it was the green one in 470 layout.

52: It is possible that it was in salt water. I wonder where the boat was originally from. Under the jib stay chainplates there is a piece of metal Im guessing to disperse the load of the shrouds. There is a picture and they look kinda corroded. I should take them off and clean them. Maybe I should take everything off and clean under thing and make sure all the spiderwebs and dirt and stuff is all gone.



What was the thinking behind a mast gate?
On each side of the mast partner there are 2 holes spaced maybe 2 inches apart. Were these just rivets? Picture 10
There are 4 holes in a rectangle just above the gooseneck. No idea what those were for.
When the jib halyard comes out of the mast is it wrapped back to the chainplates near the mast step and then up to a purchase under the centerboard trunk? it doesn't look like there is anywhere for it to go after it comes out of the mast.

There are some interesting pictures here. This boat looks very similar to mine. 470-vanguard-for-sale.31814

Dont worry about not being able to respond. You've already helped a ton!
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
Would the measurements be in a tuning guide? 470 website? I plan on trying to get all of the measurements as close as I can to what the tuning guides say.
The legal stuff is in the class rules: https://www.sailing.org/tools/documents/470CR150119-[24655].pdf and the measurement diagram: https://www.sailing.org/tools/documents/470005080213BuildSpec-[14399].pdf

The tuning guides of different sailmakers aren't as helpful as they should be. The ones I've seen are outdated, incomplete, and/or written in bad English. I can help with the details once you get to the actual tuning. The one thing before that would be to see if the mast step is in the right place, and if not, reposition it.

27: If it ain't broke don't fix it but maybe if I take it apart and file some of the fiberglass out it would go parallel. If I have to drill a hole that can't be the end of the world. It seems like this wouldn't really impact the flow that much or would it
It's not about the flow but the minimizing of weather helm. I wouldn't file the fibreglass as that would weaken the blade. You could try filing the lower gudgeon on the rudder head (I think it's cast aluminium) instead.

31: Those harken 29 blocks are all over this boat it seems like and most look brand new. There are no scratches or fading on them and the rivets are shiny. They seem a little to big in some places.
The sideways block might make sense if it was lower like where the spin ratchets usually are but its right up with the other one. Should I drill out the rivets and put it the other way? It's like this on both sides.
I think we're talking about different blocks here. There's a Harken 22 mm ("Micro") block up the mast with absolutely no function I can think of. That has been added after the mid-1980s.
The 29 mm ("Bullet") ones were something brand new when that boat was built, but sounds like many (maybe all) have been added later. Don't remove any just yet.

42: I put the yellow line there so the gooseneck wouldn't come off. There are a bunch of holes drilled in that area that you can't see because they are either out of frame and higher up on the mast or are covered up by the gooseneck. I saw similar holes in another forum on the same type of mast. I think it was the green one in 470 layout.
Ok. There has obviously been some other type of gooseneck there which has left those holes. Don't worry about them.

What was the thinking behind a mast gate?
If you mean the closing of it with a latch (as likely was the case), it was probably a safety feature, but a redundant one as the forestay keeps the mast up anyway. (We'll talk about forestay length later; it's quite possible that you have to lengthen it.)

On each side of the mast partner there are 2 holes spaced maybe 2 inches apart. Were these just rivets?
As I said, there's been a(n unnecessary) sideways jib lead adjustment here most likely. As with any useless holes that go through to a tank, fill them if they leak and then forget about them.

When the jib halyard comes out of the mast is it wrapped back to the chainplates near the mast step and then up to a purchase under the centerboard trunk? it doesn't look like there is anywhere for it to go after it comes out of the mast.
The tensioning system may lie along the mast, the centreboard case, or both.

There are some interesting pictures here. This boat looks very similar to mine. 470-vanguard-for-sale.31814
Interesting indeed. That really does show several relevant details, such as the spinnaker "bag" set up, and the way the centreboard uphaul fairlead + cleats were intended to be used.

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