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Bailer pros and cons

Kevin Mc

Active Member
I've installed bailers in all three hulls I've owned and have never had an issue with one (i.e., they've effectively removed the water from the cockpit while the boat was in motion), yet I've seen numerous posts against them. I'm curious as to why some people like them and others don't. Doesn't drain the water? Adds too much drag? Don't like the sucking sound it makes while under way? :D I don't want to start a bailer flame war! Just hear other's pros and cons.
 

Alan S. Glos

Active Member
Bailers are a good thing. They remove water from the cockpit. The old DePersia (sp?) metal bailers tended to rust solid, especially in salt water, but they were sturdy and worked fine if maintained. The new style plastic units don't rust but they do break. It is too bad that we can't use a proper Elvstrom style stainless steel suction bailer that folds flush when not in use, but
it is what it is.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
Alan hit the nail on the head, IMHO.

One has to be somewhat careful with the plastic bailers. For instance, don't drag the boat on its left side across rough surfaces.
For the bailer to function, the boat needs some speed. And to get rid of the last bit of water, a sponge will come in handy.

Finally, a boat suitable for racing should have a legal bailer.
 

sailcraftri

Well-Known Member
Most racers remove the o-ring and silicone the clamshell to the hull to avoid the gap that usually occurs wiith the o-ring.
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
Most racers remove the o-ring and silicone the clamshell to the hull to avoid the gap that usually occurs wiith the o-ring.
That my not be not legal. I remember a Worlds where the (new; out of the box) hulls were inspected to see if the bailer had been installed with the proper O-ring. In other words, the Class Measurer suspected that some bailers were installed flat against the hull.
This happened about 10 years ago, and the rules may have changed...
 

Kevin Mc

Active Member
Too true about having to take care not to drag the bailer over something. The bunks on my trailer run side-to-side so I have to remember when sliding the boat from the trailer onto the dolly and vice versa to lift it so the bailer clears the aft-most bunk.
I didn't have a gap with my previous hull (Sunfish clone that I drilled the cockpit and installed the bailer into), but the gap is noticeable on my current (real Sunfish) hull. I've considered ways to eliminate the gap - I don't race so I'm not worried about being class legal.
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
That my not be not legal. I remember a Worlds where the (new; out of the box) hulls were inspected to see if the bailer had been installed with the proper O-ring. In other words, the Class Measurer suspected that some bailers were installed flat against the hull.
This happened about 10 years ago, and the rules may have changed...
At the Worlds for some reason they require the o-ring to be used, but there is no issue not using it on your own boat.
 

Harold Knutzak

New Member
Harold,

Here are two photos. I have several for sale if you want one. $45 + $5 shipping. E-mail me at: aglos@colgate.edu

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
Thanks for posting the pictures Alan. I have several bronze thru hull fittings here and wanted to know what the original looked like to see if I can retro something to fit. Seems to me that the metal would hold up better, than the plastic on the outside of the hull.
Harry
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
The Class Measurer (Rob Eberle) has spoken and the answer is

Beldar Boathead is correct (post #9). When the Worlds were sailed in new, Manufacturer-provided, boats, the O-rings were required, but for your own boat, it is class legal to omit the O-ring and 'glue' the bailer flush to the hull.


;) Now I understand why my racing results have been dismal most of the time; it's the O-ring...

Thanks Rob!

PS: The days of manufacturer-provided boats at the Worlds are history :(
 
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