470 Questions

US 1214

Member
Having never used a spinnaker before, I went to a (free) workshop where instructors were outlining the basics of setting, tuning, trimming, jibing, and taking down the spinnaker. Everything was taught on a Thistle, which we later went and sailed and actually flew the spin. One of the crucial points when raising the spin (on a Thistle) was to lower the jib. You mentioned earlier that the jib on a 470 stays up all the time -- so do you sail the jib under the spin the same way as you would without the spin?
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
do you sail the jib under the spin the same way as you would without the spin?
Pretty much, yeah. As a rule of thumb though, it's better to sheet it too loose than too tight. On a reach, sheet it so the lower telltails are flying (or the luff is nearly flapping a third of the way up); the top of the sail will invert but that's not a problem. On a run, just keep both jib sheets loose enough so that the sail doesn't obstruct the air flow too much. You can actually use the jib as a big telltale: if it wants to move to windward, then you're sailing too low in most conditions and situations. You may also want to tie the stopper knots on the sheets so that the clew can't go forward of the luff (so you don't get the jib wrapped around itself).

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US 1214

Member
I rely heavily on telltales to trim the sails. The sails I have don’t have telltales (they never did). I believe these can be purchased in the form of stickers. Where is the ideal mounting location? Are all telltales the same? (I don’t want to buy ones that are too heavy).
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
You can buy telltail sets, and you can make your own from wool thread (not too fluffy) and pieces of spinnaker tape. As for placement, find and look at pictures of top 470 sailors and their setups. (I will be on my phone for the next two weeks, and have a hard time with any links here.)
I've never seen telltails that would have actually been too heavy. Many have been located too close to a seam, though, and gotten repeatedly stuck.

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US 1214

Member
Still alive :D. Been sailing the 470 an awful lot, even passed a Hobie 16 on a reach (though they flew by us on every other point of sail :confused:). We have only flown the Spinnaker a few times due to complexity and pure chaos it creates for us newbies to get it up/down and filled properly. Does the spinnaker pole attach to the guy in a fixed location, or should the guy be able to slide through the pole?

P.S.
Thanks for all the help above, it’s been tremendously helpful in preparing the boat for the summer:D.
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(Yes I know that the trapeze isn’t properly fastened, there aren’t battens in the sails, and I haven’t added tell tails yet)
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
The first thing I thought seeing the first picture was "get some battens... at least a top batten!" Heh. But great to see that boat on the water!

Yes, the guy has to slide through the pole end fittings (it would be a pain if it didn't). You should still fly the spinnaker and adjust the pole height so that the pole end practically touches the sail.

The trapeze system looks fine, you just want to shorten the wires a bit. You can see in the last picture that the crew will have a hard time coming in when the handle is that low (and btw he's holding it with the wrong hand).

Would be nice to see what the tillercam has recorded!

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US 1214

Member
Yes, battens are on the list ;). I bought crimps for the wire, but I do not have a crimping tool. Would smushing the crimps in a vice be adequate?
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
I don't think a vice would work because you want to squeeze the crimp from all directions at once. Ask at your club if someone has the right tools, or where they get their wire work done.

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US 1214

Member
Battens - would 420 batten kit suffice? I would like to just purchase a bunch of stock (then I could batten the Holder 14’s sail as well (which may not do much good since that sail is the consistency of a black garbage bag :confused:)). How flexible should a batten be? Do all battens in the sail have the same amount of flexibility?
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
The 420 main has four battens (the 470 has only three), and they most likely don't fit into a 470 main (probably too short). You better order a real 470 set of battens from North or Ullman. I have a hard time posting links until Monday, but I'll see what I can find then.
 

US 1214

Member
Broke my tiller extension yesterday.

Released the main in a gust and didn’t get it in quick enough, ended up dumping my crew (who was on the trap) :confused:. Boat veered windward capsized then turtled :eek:. Fortunately the boat very easily rights (this has happened many times before).

The only damage was a severed extension and an unhappy crew :confused:. Anyways, I was looking to make a new pole out of either fiberglass or aluminum (found on McMaster Carr).

What’s the ‘proper’ length of the extension? I always thought that the pole was too short (especially when my toes are in the hiking strap and I’m sitting towards the bow over the traveler) - in this scenario, the pole no longer fits in my lap.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
What’s the ‘proper’ length of the extension?
I am out of touch with what people are using in the class nowadays, but a good general rule of thumb is to go for the longest stick that you can tack comfortably, with the outboard end of it near the mainsheet cleat when you're head to wind. So it depends on your tiller length, too. If you're making it yourself, you might want to set the rudder at a typical mid-tack angle and measure the joint-to-mainsheet distance, as a starting point.

If you always swing the extension to the other side the other way (so it's pointing aft), then its length is a little less critical; just don't make it so long that it all too easily reaches the facial area of the crew in normal position :D

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US 1214

Member
Roll tack with no crew? What does that look like?

I found myself sailing alone the majority of the time. Which is fun, especially on a reach where the boat planes easier. The problem is, I weigh significantly under the optimal, and can’t roll the boat significantly on tacks (jibes seem to roll easier).

The usual roll (as taught in the c420) was performed by syncing the crew and skipper movement across the hull. Sometimes the crew would move across the hull again to keep the boat flat after the tack. I usually use the main sheet between the boom and block as a handle (though I’m not sure if this is good practice).
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
Roll tack with no crew? What does that look like?
The skipper moves in the same way as with a crew. Of course, in lighter air the movement starts closer to the centreline, and ends there as well on the new tack, so you play part of the crew's role then.

I usually use the main sheet between the boom and block as a handle (though I’m not sure if this is good practice).
I'm sure it's not - if you feel you need to grab something, try something more rigid, like the traveller track.

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David Hughes

New Member
The red boat looks excellent. Well done! Battens for the #2 and #3 pockets are about 755-775mm. Class rules keep the pockets at 800mm. The top batten varies based on the type of main used. There are longer and shorter battens, but it doesn't mean that one sail is smaller than the other by much....just different theories. Top battens are usually about 1060mm. For tiller extensions, either go short (about 950mm) or long (1450mm) If you are in need of sails, let me know. There are some donation programs that make their way down from the Olympic team. Dave Hughes (hughes470@gmail.com)
 

David Hughes

New Member
Most boards do get scratches. However, there are shimming materials on the market to tape along the top and bottom of the centercase (this would be lengthwise to the hull). In the end, much of it depends on bolt tension. If the board is tight on land, then it will be too tight on the water. Ideally, the board wants to drop a little on land and, thus, will need a rope (or use the cunningham) to keep it in the case while ashore.
 

US 1214

Member
Most boards do get scratches. However, there are shimming materials on the market to tape along the top and bottom of the centercase (this would be lengthwise to the hull). In the end, much of it depends on bolt tension. If the board is tight on land, then it will be too tight on the water. Ideally, the board wants to drop a little on land and, thus, will need a rope (or use the cunningham) to keep it in the case while ashore.

Thanks! She’s all packed up for the season, won’t see water until next season :(. Now “bolt tension” is new... Is the “bolt” the boards pivot? This can’t be easily tightened on my boat as it is captured in glass on both sides.

I’m a bit concerned about the boards mechanism (I won’t be able to post pictures for a while :( ). The original system relied on the tension in a segment of shock chord to bias the board either “up” or “down” - no in between. I wanted to change this so I have more control over the exposed foil surface in the water. The easiest way to accomplish that, I guess, would be to use two cam cleats that lock the boards control lines - that way, the board could be “up”, “down” or anywhere in between. Any thoughts?

Thanks!
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
In the end, much of it depends on bolt tension. If the board is tight on land, then it will be too tight on the water.
David, Ryan's boat has no centreboard "bolt" in the sense of what the vast majority of 470s have - see posts #20, 21 and 23 in this thread. (It's actually somewhat similar to what I have on my Lightning.)

Now “bolt tension” is new... Is the “bolt” the boards pivot?
Yes it is. I assume you can adjust the tension on the screws that act as the bolt, but then of course you have to take the whole thing out of the centreboard case, and the effect is probably not the same anyway.

I’m a bit concerned about the boards mechanism (I won’t be able to post pictures for a while :( ). The original system relied on the tension in a segment of shock chord to bias the board either “up” or “down” - no in between. I wanted to change this so I have more control over the exposed foil surface in the water. The easiest way to accomplish that, I guess, would be to use two cam cleats that lock the boards control lines - that way, the board could be “up”, “down” or anywhere in between. Any thoughts?
NO CLEATS! You want to have complete control over the centreboard when the boat is upside down and you can't reach any cleats then. The only way to play is to rig a continuous "friction" system which is held taut by elastic. The top boats today have separate lines for uphaul and downhaul led to the side tanks but that would be overkill for your purposes. You won't need many new parts to build a simple working system.

Discovered the “like button” today (hehe :D). Thanks for all the help!
Thanks for the thanks :D There used to be "dislike", "agree", "disagree", "informative" and "useful" buttons, too. I miss them.

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US 1214

Member
Spent all day retrieving my main halyard from inside the mast . It wasn’t just skied, it was tangled in the spinnaker halyard, the forestay, wrapped around internal fittings and stuck in foam (?) inside the mast :confused: (though most the tangling and wrapping was probably from my efforts to retrieve it :oops:). Ended up unstepping the mast and pulling it out completely (which was much more involved than I thought would be) and sent a fishing wire through (again not easy because it had to travel through foam (why is there foam in my mast?). Had to do it twice since the first time the internal lines became twisted and caused chafing on every system running through the mast.

Question: has anyone done this before? Is there any tricks to retrieving lines from within a mast?

Also, here’s some pictures of the boat currently. New finishes on the blades, new finish on the teak, fresh coat of paint (which is becoming seasonal), new centerboard gasket (no more stuffing a red noodle into the centerboard truck to stop water :D), and finally a makeshift spinnaker bag made from an old sail bag, don’t have a picture of that yet.

Yes I know there’s no battens in the sails, been meaning to do that. Any good sources to purchase those?

Cheers
 

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LaLi

Well-Known Member
And then there's the red boat :D

why is there foam in my mast?
It's possible that there was a class rule about that back in the day. Or some Frenchman thought it was a good idea.

has anyone done this before? Is there any tricks to retrieving lines from within a mast?
Yes and yes! But it's never easy. One trick is to remove the mast heel fitting, let the halyard come out of the mast foot, feed a thin messenger line down from the exit hole so that it comes out of the mast foot as well, connect the two, and pull the free end of the messenger. This probably includes drilling out a few rivets, but so does removing things like exit blocks in order to have a bigger hole to catch whatever you want to come through. (Of course, if the exit blocks are integrated in the heel fitting, or otherwise very close to it, you don't even need the messenger.)

Nothing guarantees though that the lines & wires pass one another inside the mast the way they were intended! It's good however to tension all other halyards/lines (other than the one being installed) before threading another. It's easier, too, if you can hold the mast upright (or at least non-horizontal) while doing this. Second- and third-floor balconies have come in handy :D

a makeshift spinnaker bag made from an old sail bag
What happened to the Harkens?

Yes I know there’s no battens in the sails, been meaning to do that. Any good sources to purchase those?
I'd contact David (see post #51 above). Or your closest North loft. (These guys should be able to help you: Milford, Connecticut | North Sails)

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US 1214

Member
I couldn’t justify putting holes into the hull and buying bags... yet. I will probably outfit the boat with bags and new lines on the halyards next season.

I’ll message David.

Thanks :)
 
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