Video: A Southeast Day At Tomales Bay

andyatos

Active Member
Thread starter #1
With a north Pacific High producing north to northwest winds 15 miles offshore and a low off southern California creating southerly flow, we had the classic large, counter clockwise spinning eddy along the northern California coast… giving us southeast winds at Tomales Bay.

The winds were already blowing when the sensors turned on at 6 am so I got there early and was on the water at 9:30 am. Sailed for a little over 5 hours with one break on a nice Point Reyes beach.

Conditions varied from 5-10 mph to as high as 25 mph “Fog Bank Blasts” from the cold air pouring down off the northeast side of Point Reyes and jetting out from localized canyons on to the water.

Was a nice day with Dennis, Greg and Phil. Here’s some video of the day.

- Andy
 
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thieuster

Active Member
#2
Great scenery! It's totally different from our views when you're on the water. In short? It's as flat as a pancake over here. Thanks for posting this
 

andyatos

Active Member
Thread starter #3
Great scenery! It's totally different from our views when you're on the water. In short? It's as flat as a pancake over here. Thanks for posting this
Hi Thieuster!

By "flat as a pancake" I'm assuming you mean over where you sail in the Netherlands, it's flat lands?

Cheers,

- Andy
 
#4
Excellent video, brought back many good memories of sailing in Cali... some of those bayside homes were pretty nice too, that gray one early on with the wraparound deck had my name all over it, LOL. Was that Norcalsail's boat I saw in the video? Looked like it if my memory still serves... if it was Norcalsail, I'm glad he's getting out there to share some nautical adventures. Best way to learn, get out there and do it... I noted the fog bank offshore, fog was occasionally a serious factor while making one's way back up the channel in Dago, or even making one's way TO the channel (sea buoy), LOL. I think fog is more of a hazard up north, but Dago does see some thick pea soup fogs at times, though they occur more frequently at night. Heavy fog in daylight hours, not as common as it is up there in your latitudes... anyway, thanks for the video, good way to relive some sailing adventures of the past. Keep up the good work!!! CHEERS!!! :cool:
 

thieuster

Active Member
#5
Yes, the highest points here are electrical power windmills and the odd church tower in the middle of the old small cities, once important trade 'hubs' and harbours. The big advantage is that there's often enough wind and mostly without shifts inflicted by the shores.

This video is made for the 2015 Laser WC and explains the wind shifts in Medemblik (one of the two 'homes' of Dutch Sailing - this is for inshore racing). Note the absence of hills, mountains etc. In fact, we don't have rocks an boulders in our soil... Only clay and sand. Not really mountain-material.

 
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andyatos

Active Member
Thread starter #7
This video is made for the 2015 Laser WC and explains the wind shifts in Medemblik
That was a cool video. I particularly liked during the onshore breeze section, "Every 7th wave is a big one." You guys have quite the sailing culture over there! And yes, it really does look flat as a pancake from water level.

- Andy
 
#8
Yes, Dago = San Diego, CA :confused:

Good to see Norcalsail has some mentors for sailing on the Pacific, he'll learn much faster that way... plus it's fun to sail in a squadron when you're with friends. :rolleyes:
 
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