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shopping and fixing questions

TippyTurtle

New Member
Hi!

We are been sailing several times now in our Sunfish and are all loving it. The halyard that came with our boat needs to be replaced. We also don't have a painter or a daggerboard bungee. The other ropes aren't in the best of shape either, but are fine.

I have seen the complete Sunfish line replacement kits that are sold at a few of the online sail shops. Are they good? Worthwhile? Some better than others? As we don't know what types of ropes are best for the different functions, this seemed like a good solution for us.

Our Sunfish has a loop in the middle of the traveler. Our kids have sailed other Sunfish without this loop and prefer that. Is there a way to convert ours? Is it possible to just cut the clip? I did see that is is possible to buy the other style traveler, but wasn't sure if that was necessary or how easy it would be to switch.

The picture is just for fun. I loved seeing my kids venture further out into the lake as their confidence grows.
IMG_5070.jpeg
 

Weston

Member
I prefer the traveler without the loop. It seems to distribute the force better across the two connection points to the deck. I don't know of a way to convert a looped traveler to an unlooped one.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
eBay offers Sunfish bridle replacements--made by a veteran. (But you can make your own).

I've got four completed next to my armchair--waiting to be installed on my own fleet. :rolleyes:
 

nhsusan57

Member
Hey Tippy,
If you switch out the traveler be careful! Remove the screws one at a time on each side. You DO NOT want the backer block for the eye straps falling off and clinking into your hull. Personally, I’ve got no issue with the loop, but I have read the benefits to ‘loopless’
That is very good advice and something that I would have never thought of.
Thank you.
 

wjejr

Active Member
Hi Tippy,

As Mr. Boathead suggests, unless you are racing the boat, I would use line. It's cheap, it will never rust/corrode, it won't mar the tiller as much, and you can fool around with the length easily. Years ago line was legal for racing, but then people started doing rope tricks and the class went back to wire.

Hope that is helpful.
 

wjejr

Active Member
Hello High Bar Sailor. People would also tie limiting knots in the bridle restricting how far the main-sheet clip could slide. This would have given sailors the option as to where the main would sheet into before most/all of the further trimming would pull down on the leach. Given the rig is not on center in a Sunfish anyway, you can see all the experimentation, analysis, and general overthinking that could and did go on. The wire bridle doesn't allow for all that.
 

Weston

Member
Hello High Bar Sailor. People would also tie limiting knots in the bridle restricting how far the main-sheet clip could slide. This would have given sailors the option as to where the main would sheet into before most/all of the further trimming would pull down on the leach. Given the rig is not on center in a Sunfish anyway, you can see all the experimentation, analysis, and general overthinking that could and did go on. The wire bridle doesn't allow for all that.
This forum is a wealth of knowledge and experience. Where else could you learn these subtle lessons or capture this history. Thanks for sharing.
 

TippyTurtle

New Member
Don't know why I hadn't thought to just use a line! Great advice! We will do just that next time we get to take the boat out and report back! This forum has been great for us! Appreciate all of the advice!
 

Fremont

Member
I've got the wire loop "traveler" on my 1978. I don't really consider it a traveler, since it's not adjustable. The mainsheet might just as well connect to an eyelet on the deck.
That said, a rope traveler would limit how much you can sheet in sail when you are really pinching as much as possible. I like the idea of an adjustable rope traveler, even though, I guess, class rules prohibit it.
Most bigger boats have an adjustable traveler. My Hobie has an 8' long track, with a traveler car, on the rear crossbar. The bitter end of the mainsheet provides adjustment to the car.
 
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