Plate 2 Blocks

Thread starter #1
Hello all. I'm new on this forum and I'm glad to be here. A few weeks ago I bent this plate, and I've broke 1 of these blocks. So I bought the replacement from rooster or something like that. When I took off the stock plate I found that 1 of holes was too big for a screw, so now it stays on the hull only with one crew. My boat is actually old (hull №166731) so I was ready to see this. Now a question : is here some was how I can fix that?
P.S: I bought replacement plate and screws and when I put 1 screw it was okay, but the second one I could put in just with 1 finger, it was "dancing" in this hole. When I'll be in my club I'll take a few pictures and may some video. Screenshot_20190213-184331.png
 

torrid

Just sailing
#2
It sounds like to me the old fitting pulled out at some point, and somebody fixed it by drilling it out and inserting a bigger screw. I would not sail with the new fittling and only a single screw. That will only cause the remaining screw to pull out at some point due to the asymmetric load.

I can see two ways to fix this. First, would it be possible to drill out the hole in the fitting so the larger screw could fit thought it? Presumably the screw will still grip the existing hole in the hull.

The second way to fix it would be to refill the hole in the hull and redrill it. Simplest would be to fill it with epoxy resin. A better way might be to drill out the hole completely and epoxy it a section of dowel rod. You could sand the dowel rod flush, then drill a hole for the smaller screw in the dowel.
 
Thread starter #3
"The second way to fix it would be to refill the hole in the hull and redrill it. Simplest would be to fill it with epoxy resin. A better way might be to drill out the hole completely and epoxy it a section of dowel rod. You could sand the dowel rod flush, then drill a hole for the smaller screw in the dowel."
Can you please explain to me this? And if you are able send me links for epoxy resin?
 
Thread starter #4
The second way to fix it would be to refill the hole in the hull and redrill it. Simplest would be to fill it with epoxy resin. A better way might be to drill out the hole completely and epoxy it a section of dowel rod. You could sand the dowel rod flush, then drill a hole for the smaller screw in the dowel
Or best way is if you know any video how to do this. Because I'm really scared of this, not want to see how it goes out right in the sea...
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#5
First, the likely reason that your original plate got bent is that your mast retaining line was too tight, or tied in a way that doesn't let the mast rotate enough.

There are a number of ways to fix the loose-screw problem. The first that comes to mind is to see if you can fit a bigger screw through the plate holes; if not, you can fill the hole in the deck with epoxy and redrill the hole in the original place. (I now see torrid already said it.)

You can also reposition the whole plate slightly by drilling two new holes in the deck; look at the measurement diagrams before doing that.

Then you can of course bolt the plate, but if you don't already have an inspection port near the mast, it's probably not worth the trouble to install one.

would it be possible to drill out the hole in the fitting so the larger screw could fit thought it?
Sure it's possible, but it might be illegal. I'll have to check it.

And yes, it's really nice to see someone from Greece here... I actually sailed in your home waters last year, at the Lightning Europeans :D

_
 
Thread starter #6
First, the likely reason that your original plate got bent is that your mast retaining line was too tight, or tied in a way that doesn't let the mast rotate enough.

There are a number of ways to fix the loose-screw problem. The first that comes to mind is to see if you can fit a bigger screw through the plate holes; if not, you can fill the hole in the deck with epoxy and redrill the hole in the original place. (I now see torrid already said it.)

You can also reposition the whole plate slightly by drilling two new holes in the deck; look at the measurement diagrams before doing that.

Then you can of course bolt the plate, but if you don't already have an inspection port near the mast, it's probably not worth the trouble to install one.

Sure it's possible, but it might be illegal. I'll have to check it.

And yes, it's really nice to see someone from Greece here... I actually sailed in your home waters last year, at the Lightning Europeans :D

_
Thank you so much. I'll go to my coach and we'll talk about epoxy resin, but I think that's the best way now. Cause this boat is perfect, and if I'll fix this it will be way more better than now ;)
 

torrid

Just sailing
#7
"The second way to fix it would be to refill the hole in the hull and redrill it. Simplest would be to fill it with epoxy resin. A better way might be to drill out the hole completely and epoxy it a section of dowel rod. You could sand the dowel rod flush, then drill a hole for the smaller screw in the dowel."
Can you please explain to me this? And if you are able send me links for epoxy resin?
I'll try to post some more later when I'm at home. However, you would want a two-part hardening resin like which would be used in fiberglass repair. West System epoxy comes to mind. You could maybe even use Marine Tek. As these are generally brands in the US, maybe LaLi could suggest something similar available in Europe.

For the dowel, you would want to use a "fluted dowel pin":


I would think something 8-10mm in diameter. Should be available at a hardware store. You would drill out the old hole so the dowel pin fits in place, the glue it in place with the epoxy resin. The ridges will give the epoxy extra surface area to grip. You can the drill a new hole for the screw in the dowel pin.
 
Thread starter #8
I'll try to post some more later when I'm at home. However, you would want a two-part hardening resin like which would be used in fiberglass repair. West System epoxy comes to mind. You could maybe even use Marine Tek. As these are generally brands in the US, maybe LaLi could suggest something similar available in Europe.

For the dowel, you would want to use a "fluted dowel pin":


I would think something 8-10mm in diameter. Should be available at a hardware store. You would drill out the old hole so the dowel pin fits in place, the glue it in place with the epoxy resin. The ridges will give the epoxy extra surface area to grip. You can the drill a new hole for the screw in the dowel pin.
Damn... Thank you so much for this information!) I'll fix it asap now. Now I know what do I need)
 
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