One man rigging time

no4j

New Member
Thread starter #1
Hello all,
I'm new here and do not yet own a Capri. I'm looking at a couple of 14.2s that I am interested in. Question for the forum.

What do you think would be the time it would take one experienced man to rig the boat from arrival at the ramp on the trailer to sails up in the water?

I'm a 62 year old man with a lot of experience (but a long time ago) and my wife has no experience in any kind of sailboat. I'm really looking forward to getting a boat and testing the hiking straps. The boat will be kept in my garage on the trailer.

BTW, in 1965, my brother and I won the Florida State Championship in the Windmill class. That's a 15.5 ft plywood screamer. Just bragging. :)

Thanks,

Dave
 
#3
I think I can do it in 7 to 10, but I (a) have the jib on a roller furler, and (b) keep my main on the boom during the season. Though I will say that I do get help stepping the mast, I think it would be a difficult job for one person.
 
#4
There are posts in this forum from many years ago about how to step the mast single handed. I do it solo every time. I can try to find those if you would like me to search for them.
 
#9
About 20 mins. I have everything but the forestay attached. I let out a few feet of cable from the winch, walk the mast up, then clip it. Jump off the boat and attached the forestay to the bow.
 
#10
Yup, about 20 minutes for me, too. I usually sail single-handed, so stepping the mast by myself is part of the deal. I don't find it that heavy or awkward (and I'm not all that buff!), but I do need to do something to stabilize it before attaching the forestay (like a lot of folks, I leave the shrouds attached all the time). I like the idea of using the main halyard. Think I'll put a small bowline on the end without the shackle and attach a line that I keep in the boat for a stern line, etc, that has a snap on one end to give it a bit more length. What I've been doing is taking that line to a smal block that I've attached to the forward mast support on the trailer, tying one end to the mast about 5-6' up from the deck then bringing the other end back to the jib cleat (on the mast) to tie-off. That provides plenty of support while securing the forestay to the roller furler drum. At first, I'd just hold the mast forward with the forestay alone, but while fumbling with the clevis pin and ring ding, I'd have all these nightmarish visions of loosing my grip and having the mast come crashing down!
 
#11
It takes me about 20 minutes to get the boat rigged up solo, and I take my time. During the sailing season, I keep my old main wrapped around the boom. Put in the mast pin, raise the mast, walk the forestay forward and clip it in. The rest is unrolling the main, raising the main, running the mainsheet, tiller/rudder, and jib.

-Robert
1989 Capri 14.2
1984 Catalina 22
 
#12
Today I rigged the boat using the main halyard to stabilize the mast while I attached the forestay to the roller furler drum and had the main already attached to the boom (I flaked it and held it with ties rather than rolling it around the boom). It was ramp-ready in 10 minutes! Now, that's the way to go. Could've trimmed off a few more seconds if I had a snap shackle for the main halyard, but hey, this isn't a race!
 
#13
I rigged mine singlehanded today, first time out this year, it was about fifteen minutes at the ramp. I live close to the harbor, just a few blocks, so I prep stuff like the main and whatnot at home. I use the jib halyard and an extra line from the front of the trailer to a cleat as well.
 

no4j

New Member
Thread starter #14
Well, I did buy a Capri yesterday. Here is a link to a pic.

http://daveandbarby.com/images/my_baby_small.jpg

Thanks for all the good info. I played with it all morning on the trailer and found the rigging to be easy and simple.

I only have 2 issues now....

1. The jib car sets are missing the fairleads.
2. No drain plug.

These can be solved with a call to Catalina direct.
Any ideas about getting the fairleads without having to buy the entire car assembly?

I can use a cork for the drain plug until the order from CD arrives.

Overall, very happy and can't wait to get it in the water.

Dave
 
#15
Hmmm...
Not so sure I'd risk using a cork for the drain plug. Very bad thing if that were to come out on the water. Maybe others have done this successfully?
 

no4j

New Member
Thread starter #16
Hmmm...
Not so sure I'd risk using a cork for the drain plug. Very bad thing if that were to come out on the water. Maybe others have done this successfully?
Of course you're right. What a hoot that would be. But I will definitely expedite shipping from Catalina Direct. I have a hellovan itch I need to scratch.

Dave
 
#17
Those plugs are cheap (universal) at any outdoor supply store like Gander mt. or any sporting goods place with a boating/fishing section, I bet you could even get one from wallmart.
 

no4j

New Member
Thread starter #18
Actually, I bought one at Walmart yesterday but it was too big. I thought they would be universal too, but I guess not. I'll try Gander. We have one near by.

Thanks.
 
#19
Well, I did buy a Capri yesterday.
....
I only have 2 issues now....

1. The jib car sets are missing the fairleads.
2. No drain plug.

These can be solved with a call to Catalina direct.
Any ideas about getting the fairleads without having to buy the entire car assembly?

I can use a cork for the drain plug until the order from CD arrives.

...

Dave
Try APS. They also have the drain plugs.
 

no4j

New Member
Thread starter #20
Thanks. Unfortunately, I've already installed the parts I got from Catalina Direct. However, this is another good resource for the bookmarks

Another thing I need is hiking straps and the flex connector for the hiking stick.

I found Ronstan's web site. I just need to call them in insure I get the correct one.

Thanks again.
 
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