New owner, older hull Serial# 010013 refurbishing for my daughter

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#25
Check your serial number, those numbers might be swapped around, my guess is you have a 1972 boat. Also looks like repair on the port side, definitely an area to leak check.

You can probably tap those blocks back into position with a rubber mallet, then use the two part closed cell flotation foam like TotalBoat Flotation Foam or Fiberglast. I'm tempted at times to use Great Stuff, it is not closed cell but if you don't let it stay wet...hmmmm.... Whatever you use, wear old clothes, long sleeve shirt, and gloves. I got my hand coated with that stuff once and thought I was going to lose a layer of skin.

 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#26
That color scheme indicates a mid-80s boat. That vintage tended more to be more in the 125 lb range. Racers liked the mid 80s boats a lot.

The Vanguard target for the rolled edge boats was 125-127 lbs. No idea what Laser Performance targets. Sunfish Laser Inc. rolled edge boats often weighted about 120 but I don't know how durable they proved to be.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#28
You should get a base cap for that mast so it doesn't damage the mast step. And check inside the mast step for chipped polyester resin.

Also I'm the tire guy, check the sidewalls for the WWYY manufacture code, they shouldn't be any older than 6 years old. The code on the tire below 3504 indicates they were made September 2004, came off our County Sheriff's trailer :)

IMG_5112.jpg

IMG_5111.jpg
 
Thread starter #30
Moving along with the boat, started removing hardware from the deck for refinishing. When I undo the screws on the bow handle and the stern traveler I notice what seems to be machine threads as opposed to screw threads. The question I have are there captive nuts on the underside of the deck? It would be good to know before I hear the dull tinkle of a nut hitting the inside of the hull as I remove the first screw. Pictures attached.
 

Attachments

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#31
Arrgh. :(

Could the threads you're seeing be in thickened epoxy rather than metal?

I'd carefully retread the machine screw back in. Maybe gently push on it to see if the nut will unseat itself. If it's secure, back out the others a similar amount, and refinish what you can without removing the bow handle.

If you intend to replace the bow handle, you're going to have to be very careful. :eek:

All bets are off. :confused:
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#33
That's a new one on me on a metal trim boat, but we haven't messed with fasteners on any metal trim boats 1983-1987. At one point the manufacturer du jour switched to a self threading machine screw with metal plate backer, no nut, but I thought that was when they moved over to the rolled edge boats circa 1988.

But to keep the plate itself (or a wooden backer block) always leave at least one screw in. Loosen the screws a tiny bit, remove all but one screw, swivel the hardware to the side, reinsert at least one screw. Then we tape those screws so when we paint they don't get all gummed up.
 
#34
My 69 fish has all machine screws now, as I put in 1/4" alum backing plates and tapped the screws into them. Doubtful, but possibly the previous owner did something similar. By the way, I don't have any inspection ports on the deck, as I cut out access holes on the bottom, epoxied backing plates as needed and re-glassed my cutouts. Inspections ports are fine, but I preferred not to have any on the deck....plus my chainsaw cuts fiberglass easily!! ha!
 
#35
With the above post said....the Sunfish came with wood backing blocks and self tapping screws. Anything else is not original to my knowledge. Maybe the new ones were thrubolted when they started using backing plates?? I don't know?
 
Thread starter #37
That's a new one on me on a metal trim boat, but we haven't messed with fasteners on any metal trim boats 1983-1987. At one point the manufacturer du jour switched to a self threading machine screw with metal plate backer, no nut, but I thought that was when they moved over to the rolled edge boats circa 1988.

But to keep the plate itself (or a wooden backer block) always leave at least one screw in. Loosen the screws a tiny bit, remove all but one screw, swivel the hardware to the side, reinsert at least one screw. Then we tape those screws so when we paint they don't get all gummed up.
I did remove 1 screw from the bow handle very carefully and was able to thread it back in so I may pluck up the courage to do then one at a time. The alternative would be to unscrew until nearly out and support the hardware on small dowels cut to length and as you say tape up the threads to stop them getting gummed up.
 
Thread starter #38
My 69 fish has all machine screws now, as I put in 1/4" alum backing plates and tapped the screws into them. Doubtful, but possibly the previous owner did something similar. By the way, I don't have any inspection ports on the deck, as I cut out access holes on the bottom, epoxied backing plates as needed and re-glassed my cutouts. Inspections ports are fine, but I preferred not to have any on the deck....plus my chainsaw cuts fiberglass easily!! ha!
Perhaps that is the answer, where did you make your cuts? I used a grinder to remove this transom and replace it with Cooza board.
 

Attachments

Thread starter #40
Hi-jacking the thread. I want to replace my bow handle on my 1998 vanguard sunfish. Should I run away or is there backing wood under it?
Don't know specifically, there are others here with way more knowledge as you will see. I have removed 1 screw from mine and put it back in so there is something holding the nut or a backing plate. I would wait for greater knowledge the guys here have helped me a lot
 
Top