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Need Boat I.D.

po-man sailor

Active Member
I've been looking at these 3 boats for about a year leaning against as I drive by a junk dealer.
He just wants to get rid of them. Can anyone tell me what they are. There is no rigging or rudders/daggers. All 3 are alike. One is beat up really bad and the others appear like nothing wrong with the hulls. I like the blue one. I know they were a common boat and I have an idea they are lasers...wanting to know for sure. I think I have a tiller rudder and mast from. Another pile pickup.
 

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Monsterfish

New Member
Sunfish is a super popular boat so rigging is not really a problem. I think Laser is the same. Shouldn't be too hard to get rigging. You can search forums also a lot of stuff is on E-bay. 50 bucks is a good price:) I would think about what would need to be done with a hull in terms of restoration. I have experience with my Sunfish. I didn't even have all the tools I needed. So between tools, materials and parts it all accumulated to twice the price of the boat:)
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
The one whose deck is visible is from the early or mid-1970s. Hard to judge the blue boat when you don't see more of it, but it's probably from the 70s or 80s. The one in between could be a lot newer. I'd take that one if I had to :D

Please take and post more pictures if you're serious about this!

_
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
It is hard to get everything on the Gulf Coast, due to salt water corrosion and hurricanes, and we are at the end of the US logistics chain. I'd watch craigslist and facebook marketplace for a few weeks for rigs and rudders before I sprung for a bare hull. We had to get Alan to bring us spars.
 
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Alan S. Glos

Well-Known Member
po-man,

In general, Laser stuff tends to be more expensive than Sunfish stuff. Tread carefully. Sailcrafty makes a market in Laser parts and gear along with Sunfish stuff. Check with him first to see what a set might set you back.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
 

danpal

Active Member
I keep hearing about mast step problems in older lasers along with other issues. I would check out the hull extensively before I bought one.
 

po-man sailor

Active Member
I may just stay away. They suck me in because he's basically giving them away. The blue one and the middle one have virtually no apparent damage at all and are just faded. The one the deck is showing is garbage. Major deck and cup issues. I'm finishing up my sunfish and don't need to get back in to another boat project. I'm at about 13 boats now and its always something. Its a sickness. Lol right SC?
 

shorefun

Active Member
You could spend as much as buying a complete boat just trying to buy all the rigging unless you have time. Over time you might find all the parts at a reasonable price.

On the other hand, If the hulls are really nice you might be able to profit off the deal as there are people with all the rigging and a damaged hull. You might be able to resell the hulls online and use the money towards buying a complete boat.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
It's a passion and as Alan says, it keeps us off the mean streets of (fill in the blank of your city name).

In all honesty I think they should pay you to haul away those hulls. Even free boats are fraught with fiscal danger. "Free boats" are like "free kittens."

BC dock glamor shot 2.jpg

Laser parts would seem to be harder to come by and more expensive, and there are not nearly the same amount of parts out there. Plus it is a harder boat to sail for beginners or casual sailors, which eliminates most of our resale market. Most Laser sailors we know would want a competitive, stiff, clean hull, not a cruiser or beach banger (credit Alan again).

We went down the path of branching out to other boats, any boat, and rapidly retreated from that after fiddling with a couple of Barnett Butterflies, a Windflite and a Scorpion. Nothing is more fun to work on than a Sunfish or easier to sell.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Laser parts would seem to be harder to come by and more expensive, and there are not nearly the same amount of parts out there. Plus it is a harder boat to sail for beginners or casual sailors, which eliminates most of our resale market. Most Laser sailors we know would want a competitive, stiff, clean hull, not a cruiser or beach banger (credit Alan again).

We went down the path of branching out to other boats, any boat, and rapidly retreated from that after fiddling with a couple of Barnett Butterflies, a Windflite and a Scorpion. Nothing is more fun to work on than a Sunfish or easier to sell.
You've reminded me of the like-new Laser I bought for $60. :)

Given the local heavy boat traffic, I found it "tender" to sail, so decided to sell it. A friend said I "gave it away" at $600. :oops:

Before it was sold, my BIL asked to sail it. He's rightfully proud of his many miles of ocean sailing in Europe and the San Francisco Bay area in his Vega cruiser.

I watched as "difficulties" appeared, so I picked up HIS video camera, and filmed all four seconds of HIS capsize. :p

I quietly replaced the camera, and never heard a word of this Laser's short journey. ;)
 
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