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Laser Bahia

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi

I am considering to buy a Laser Bahia.

Main drivers to choose the Laser Bahia are:
- Day sailor with wife and daughter (2.5 years old)
- Need an engine to go from the backyard through a bridge before going sailing (5 minutes)
- Needs to be stable but also sporty (Vago is to sporty)
- No keel as I want to store it on a dry dock in the backyard
- Must be able to sail singlehanded (75% of the times I will sail alone)

I tried out the Laser Bahia and I found it relatively stable (considering the size and that there is not keel), so I believe it is the right choice for the purpose, but I am also very intersted in some feedback.

I already have a Lase XD which I use for the evening matches.

I read some feedback on the sailing capabilities, but most of it dated a few years back. Anyone with some more feedback whether this is the right choice or alternatives.

Thanks!

Hans
 

sinogin

Member
I've tried it out too. Definitely a cool boat to sail by yourself or with three other people. The trapeeze kit I bet would be alot of fun for all skill levels since the boat is very stable.

Really windy days, I would consider levaing the motor behind if possible, unless it can be fully submerged after a capsize and still run with now problems :D.
 

cwm_kmm2001

New Member
I own a Bahia and enjoy sailing it with my wife and small children. For a summer day of sailing the boat off the beach on Lake Michigan, its a dream. Throwing up the kite in the right conditions is a blast too (when the kids are playing on the beach).

The boat is stable for what it is, but I have capsized mine a number of times. If I had a motor on my boat (never tried it) I would be more selective about conditions.

Happy to answer any other questions -
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi

Thanks for the great replies.

The engine worries me slightly and I am considering to add the rowing option (it looks a bit silly), it's just a few minutes rowing until I went through the bridge and then I can start sailing.

I ordered the Bahia today and I pick it up in 2 weeks (Netherlands).

I will post some sailing experiences ones I tried it in some different weather conditions

Thanks

Hans
 

trisoneeko

New Member
Congrats on your Bahia purchase! I'm also looking at either a Vago or Bahia. I'm leaning towards a Bahia since it's a little more conducive to taking my (non sailor) girlfriend out & leisurely sailing around Lake Ontario. I'm having troubles making up my mind.

I also like the fact that it has a trapeze for when I do want to have some fun. Does anyone know if there is a "sport" version of this boat with larger sails/different rigging?

It's odd, because there doesn't seem to be a lot of information on the net from Bahia owners. Does this mean this boat will be discontinued at some point soon and parts will be a hassle? I certainly hope not.

Let us know how it goes with your new boat! Looking forward to your feedback.
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi

I also looked at the Vago and although I believe it is an excellent fun boat, it is absolutely not a fit for me. I need something slightly more stable and engine support.

I found several weblogs with some feedback on Laser easily discontinuing a model, so there is always that risk.

However I understood from the dealer that the Bahia sells quiet well and that around 1500 have been sold. I am sure a large chunk of this will be rentals and sailing schools, but it is still not a bad number.

I also found it hard to find something comparable. I looked at the RS Vision and the Topper Omega and I believe those are the only similar boats in a similar price range.

Given those competitors, I found only the RS the real competitor and given the region I am in, that is an easy choice....no real active RS dealer.

On the other side, the Laser dealer over here is very active and has a great name (I already have a 'normal' laser).

Ones I got it and tried it out, I will post some experiences.

Hans
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi

I've sailed the Bahia a couple of times now in various conditions (bought the Bahia recently)

Here are my findings:
- The engine support is a bit flimsy. I need it so it is there, but initially the bracket kept coming loose, so I glued the bolt in there. It is still shaking and looks cheap but it works. I have a 2.5 HP suzuki on it and it limits the rudder and the suzuki is shaking while sailing......but it does work! Ideally you take the engine off when sailing
- I sail the boat most of the time alone and sometimes with my wife and 2.5 year old daughter. Sailing with the family is great. The boat is relatively stable and there is plenty of space to move around. Overall, excellent boat for this. For sailing alone I am even more impressed. Even using the gennaker while sailing alone is very do-able and easy. I pull out the gennaker whenever possible. The boat is relatively quick and a lot of fun to handle. The one line reefing system is excellent. Sailing wise, absolutely great
- I have the boat in the back of my backyard where I can push it in the water. It only takes minutes to make the boat ready. I also have a cover over the jib, so I get out even quicker. The boat is moored next to a 37 feet cruiser, laser classic and a sea pro.
- The boat gets dirty easy. So it is important to not leave the boat in the water when not in use and always clean the boat after use. I have a cover over it when I know I am not going to use the boat for a couple of days
- I tipped over with the boat two times, both when sailing alone and when making a mistake (one time with the gennaker out). This was still do-able to bring the boat back up.
- The Bahia is very easy to sail however it is not the fastest boat. It does need a fair amount of wind for it to perform
- The working area if very comfortable. Nothing sharp, plenty of space, even for me being 40 and a little bit less flexible :)

Overall I would certainly advice the boat as I see not many similar boats in the market for this price.

I just borrowed an electric engine, so next I will try if that works a bit better. Otherwise there are always the oars.....

Hans
 
It has been some time since you posted these comments. Please note me if you can how sharp upwind can bahia go? Do you need two people to mount must or one can do the job? My goal is to have a boat I can take to a lake on a trailer and rig it myself, sale for few days and unrig it and take it home.

Thanks
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Yes, so I have used the Bahia now for about a year. Upwind it is a pretty fast boat and it can go very sharp upwind. I sail about 75% of the time alone. This is very do-able, however when it gets to 18 knots of wind or higher it is a lot of work that might include some swimming. Sailing alone with gennaker is absolutely a lot of fun. When the boat tips over it is easy to right it alone. Only issue I have, I have the storage box and the outboard engine mounted to the back....and there is no way to get back in the boat. I resolved this my putting a piece of rope in a loop on both sides around the beam. I can pull that into the water and step back into the boat. The outboard construction is not great and when you tip over, gas drips out of it and it is also not good for the engine. I also tried an electric engine, but that did not do it for me either. Best is to not have an engine.

It did take me some time to learn how to use the downhaul. The downhaul is really important to get the boat to sail fast.

I think the boat is a bit heavy, but that is related to the material it is build of. My boat lays outside on the dock year round (Dutch climate, ranging from sun to snow) and I have not seen anything change color. I do have the top cover on when I do not use the boat for longer then a month or so. I also made some steps to make sure the boat is not lying on the hull, but it is on two steps, like it is done with the official trailer (needed to keep the warranty)

Bottom line, a very good boat, easy to sail alone or with a family. I sometimes sail in it with the wife and a 3 year old daughter and it is perfect for that also. If you want something very sporty, there are better choices, but this is a good blend of sport, stable and fast
 

John Prizer

New Member
I am also considering a Laser Bahia and my use will be similar to some of the comments here - mostly single handed. Trailer and set up myself. Take my wife out for a gentle day sail from time to time. Maybe get my kids interested in some racing, but probably not.

One difference here in Florida is sometimes light wind. Someone said it needs some wind to perform. Does it get around okay in light wind?

I may also sail it on small inland lakes in shifty winds. Never ideal for any sailboat, but I was thinking that a stable boat like this might do reasonably well in shifty winds.

Any thoughts would be welcome.
 
I am Bahia owner! One full season, he he... But can easily say that Bahia is best boat I have ever tried. I am sailing on river on daily basis and had few weekends on some lakes here. I am from Serbia, Belgrade. Do not worry about low winds anything above 4 knots is sailable. Actually I am more used to m/s readings so 3 m/s in any direction is more than enough to sail against river current. What has struck me to answer to your post is that sailing on city river just 300ft wide on some places goes with shifty winds because of buildings and bridges, boat performs awesome and this just makes ride more fun. If you can buy used boat because you can save lots of money and boat is very sturdy, not like plexy boats.

Tipping is child's play. Since I got must float, it is even easier. few weeks ago I tipped over the boat when I was alone and I had enough time to uncleat all ropes(main and flock), climbed over, started tipping it back and jumped in, without wetting my t-shirt! I have outboard motor bracket but never used it and have box, it is useful and does not get in a way at all.

My name is Miodrag Milovancevic and since I did not have anyone to ask anything when I was buying my boat, please feel free to ask me anything, and I can even show you some pictures from sailing. My email is mali.mozak@gmail.com but I am going to be on vacation from 8. of Sep until 29.

Best regards
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi John

I have the Laser Bahia now for a few years and I really think it is a great boat.

Some characteristics I found out:
- For a boat with no keel it is a pretty stable boat. Great with kids to go fun sailing. The wife also likes it as it is a dray and easy sail (in moderate conditions).
- Very easy to set up however plenty of trimming possibilities
- I found it to take a bit of time to get the boat properly up to speed. I also use it for a neighbor for evening racing and it does take some learning and time to get proper speed out of the boat. However it is a lot of fun to learn what makes the boat go fast and there are plenty of trim options to get the max out of this boat
- Planning with Gennaker is a lot of fun and very easy. I even use the gennaker when sailing alone
- The boat can be sailed good alone. It's a shame the head sail is not easy to use when sailing alone, it's mounted to be operated by a second person. However I sail it alone up to 3 beaufort with no problems.
- The boat does not need a lot of wind to go fast but trim and position in the boat are critical to get proper speed out of the boat.
- Also very easy to launch. I have the boat moored on a dock in the backyard and it takes me minutes to get the boat sail ready
- The outboard bracket is cheap, flimsy and outdated.... However it works. The outboard is a pain to have on the back of the boat and if you tip over...well at least I am then swimming in leaking gasoline. I wrote Laser Performance an email suggesting to consider a solution that fits better the current technologies. Something like a build in electric engine system that is also used by the Hobby Cat Mirage kayaks. Laser just came back that I can put a standard electric engine on the back.....something I tried and is at least as miserable as the 2.5 HP suzuki engine I now use
- With my daughter, now 4.5 years old, I go sailing. She plays throughout the boat and often we beach the boat and go for some snacks. We also have a self made swim ladder to swim of the boat
- Boat quality is absolutely very good. I know polyethylene is not the prettiest material but given the material the boat looks pretty good.
- I have two mainsails. One for racing (mylar) and one for cruising. The mylar sail is looking very pretty and trims better then the dacron sail. It's a shame laser discontinued the mylar sail

Overall I would buy the boat right away again and it's being used a lot for different purposes.

Besides the Bahia I have a new Laser G-XD and a Dehler 29.

Hans
 

Sarahpete

New Member
I have been reading all threads about Bahia sailing above - very interesting and informative. We are fairly new to the Bahia and have been having trouble with our rudder, not dropping down into water properly, ie we have trouble pulling it down to the vertical position. Has anyone experienced this and do you have any advice or a solution please?
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi

I have only had issues with dropping or upping the blade when the rope from the blade got stuck between the blade and the rudder. I have had this maybe twice. Tightning the blade will resolve this. By tightening the blade, the rope cannot get stuck between anymore and the problem was solved.

Can you be more specific where you have an issue?
 
Ok here is what I think happened. Original rigging for rudder includes one rope going for lowering the rudder and also for lifting it. You should check bahia rigging manual and the way your rudder is rigged. I think that rope was not properly put trough the rudder and thus you can not lower rudder all the way down or hold it all the way up. You should have two cleats on your rudder, one is simpler and it is used to hold the rudder up. When you cleat the rope in upward position end of rudder should be above water. Other cleat has a mechanism used to ensure that you do not break rudder if it hits something in the water.

So before everything check rigging of rudder in rigging manual!
 
About the rope, there is one rope on new bahia, but end of this system used for lowering the rudder has a block in it in order to be able to pull on it harder.

Bahia is a terrific boat, this is my second season on it. I managed to use it without a motor, just rowing. On a river it is totally usable, even against river flow. Motor is going to give me the option to sail the portions of this river that is more distant than ones I am sailing right now. Boat is heavier than equivalent performance boat, but this is only to it's advantage since it is weather proof, very sturdy, "idiot proof".
When you get the hang of it, it is possible to rig it for under an hour single handed! You have my post describing capsizing, "child play"...

since my last posts I have tried trapezeing and this is so much fun even on the river, where you have to tack fairly often...

I am speaking from a point of view of a person that is not 100Kg bundle of muscles but a regular chubby guy weighing 85-90 Kg 176cm tall. I can use this boat in every aspect and handle it. Took it out in winds 12-16 m/s (ropes are whistling hanging in this wind) and also in breeze 2-3m/s with my wife, and it handles well in both situations. One rope reefing! One rope genaker...

I am not going to sell this boat any time soon! If anyone needs any help, just ask, also if you want to see some sailing gopro photos, I'll show it gladly...

P.s. there is a new version of this boat that does not have lower shrouds(my friend got one like that delivered) but I like mine better!

Regards
 

Hanskie1001

New Member
Hi

Great to hear you are enjoying the Bahia so much.

I am in my 3rd season with the Bahia and I agree with all you say. I also have the rowing option and the engine support. I use the engine to motor from my backyard to the lake (3 minutes but there is a bridge). It all works very well and comes across as very solid

I enjoy the club racing and the sailing alone and with the family. We tried the trapeze a few times and it is an absolute blast. The boat is a bit heavier then comparable polyester boats but I've had twice a collision with other boats during a club race and that is where it shows how durable it is.

Planing with the Bahia is a lot of fun and pretty doable

I did not know about the changes in the boat you mentioned, that is interesting to know. What I did notice is that the new boats have a smaller gennaker. I am not sure if you really want that, I like the gennaker as it is.

I have the two different main sails, mylar and dacron. The mylar sail seems to fit a bit better and it is supposed to be a little bit bigger. Unfortunately they stopped selling the mylar main sail

Enjoy the summer with the Bahia

Hans
 

Sarahpete

New Member
Thankyou for your helpful comments about rudders! We are re rigging it today and hope to sail in Portland harbour this afternoon. I should say I am a complete novice and my husband Pete would have explained this all much better. Happy Sailing!
 
You are all welcome. Once again I had a lot of problems rigging and learning about my boat because of poor support by Laser. Construction of this boat has changed and they offer no explanation about it, not even an updated version of parts locator... So if anyone needs help of any kind don't hesitate to ask
 

nuck123

New Member
Hi
I just got a new one. I have noticed the finish is pretty rough in places it's a bit like sand paper. I checked the other boats at Performance Laser and they were the same. I'm used to polished boats. Has anyone else noticed this?

Just rigging myself the gennaker sock seems to have changed the way it's attached.
 
Hi
I just got a new one. I have noticed the finish is pretty rough in places it's a bit like sand paper. I checked the other boats at Performance Laser and they were the same. I'm used to polished boats. Has anyone else noticed this?

Just rigging myself the gennaker sock seems to have changed the way it's attached.
Bahia is not a performance boat in that term so it is made of different kind of plastic, in fact it was made in a mould as a single piece. As a result, boat is rigid but twice as heavy. My friends 470 weighs roughly 120Kg and my Bahia is arround 200 maybe 220Kg. Once last summer we vent sailing on a lake not too far from where we live, it was two of us on a boat and since that was an artificial lake, water level was a bit higher so bank where we wanted to chill was flooded meadow. Since I did not want us to walk trough grass I charged to the shore with full sails on and beached us! You could never do this with plexy boat...

Bahia is supertough...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

nuck123

New Member
Hi
It's not the build it's the finish I was questioning. Most of the surface is shiny and polished but there are rough areas. I was wondering if the others were the same and if anyone had polished them out. If so what did they use. Laser need to change my centre board as it seems to be cracked on the top and the bottom was very chipped.

The rest I love.
 

nuck123

New Member
Bahia is not a performance boat in that term so it is made of different kind of plastic, in fact it was made in a mould as a single piece. As a result, boat is rigid but twice as heavy. My friends 470 weighs roughly 120Kg and my Bahia is arround 200 maybe 220Kg. Once last summer we vent sailing on a lake not too far from where we live, it was two of us on a boat and since that was an artificial lake, water level was a bit higher so bank where we wanted to chill was flooded meadow. Since I did not want us to walk trough grass I charged to the shore with full sails on and beached us! You could never do this with plexy boat...

Bahia is supertough...
How did you attach your gennaker sock?
 
How did you attach your gennaker sock?
My bahia is "older model" and main difference from what I have seen are lower shrouds, older model has those and new one does not. I got it as demonstration boat and sock was already in place.

I was explaining the way it was made because it actually has no finish. Polyester boats are made in a way that you make the surface and then you apply coats of different stuff to make it slick and shiny. This boats surface is made of same stuff inside is also on the surface. If you scratch polyester boat, you are going to see inside layers but if you scratch Bahia, you will see same white plastic. Particles that look like sand and feel like sand are one kind of sand and purpose of those is to stabilize molten polyethylene in some way and also protect from UV influence(I got this from reading prior to purchase).

It should be possible to polish this or smooth-en in some way but I think it would not make much of a difference in therms of performance because it is the same surface as a boat twice as light...
 
If someone can answer, please do! How did you setup the spreaders? Have you followed the instructions in the rigging manual or not, also how did you adjust the shrouds, is the vernier adjuster place number 7 used to tension the shroud or not?

I am asking this because when sailing is more extreme outer shroud is always loose to the point where it is swinging almost 5cm from side to side... and I can't get more tension on it, or I am doing something wrong?
 

nuck123

New Member
You are all welcome. Once again I had a lot of problems rigging and learning about my boat because of poor support by Laser. Construction of this boat has changed and they offer no explanation about it, not even an updated version of parts locator... So if anyone needs help of any kind don't hesitate to ask
Hi I am struggling to rig the Vang do you have any pictures. I have a yellow rope from the blocks on the boom that passes through the whole in the boom with nothing on the end. I have a block arrangement lick a laser kicker that does not seem to lend itself to attaching to anything????
 

Alchemist

New Member
Hi John

I have the Laser Bahia now for a few years and I really think it is a great boat.

Some characteristics I found out:
- For a boat with no keel it is a pretty stable boat. Great with kids to go fun sailing. The wife also likes it as it is a dray and easy sail (in moderate conditions).
- Very easy to set up however plenty of trimming possibilities
- I found it to take a bit of time to get the boat properly up to speed. I also use it for a neighbor for evening racing and it does take some learning and time to get proper speed out of the boat. However it is a lot of fun to learn what makes the boat go fast and there are plenty of trim options to get the max out of this boat
- Planning with Gennaker is a lot of fun and very easy. I even use the gennaker when sailing alone
- The boat can be sailed good alone. It's a shame the head sail is not easy to use when sailing alone, it's mounted to be operated by a second person. However I sail it alone up to 3 beaufort with no problems.
- The boat does not need a lot of wind to go fast but trim and position in the boat are critical to get proper speed out of the boat.
- Also very easy to launch. I have the boat moored on a dock in the backyard and it takes me minutes to get the boat sail ready
- The outboard bracket is cheap, flimsy and outdated.... However it works. The outboard is a pain to have on the back of the boat and if you tip over...well at least I am then swimming in leaking gasoline. I wrote Laser Performance an email suggesting to consider a solution that fits better the current technologies. Something like a build in electric engine system that is also used by the Hobby Cat Mirage kayaks. Laser just came back that I can put a standard electric engine on the back.....something I tried and is at least as miserable as the 2.5 HP suzuki engine I now use
- With my daughter, now 4.5 years old, I go sailing. She plays throughout the boat and often we beach the boat and go for some snacks. We also have a self made swim ladder to swim of the boat
- Boat quality is absolutely very good. I know polyethylene is not the prettiest material but given the material the boat looks pretty good.
- I have two mainsails. One for racing (mylar) and one for cruising. The mylar sail is looking very pretty and trims better then the dacron sail. It's a shame laser discontinued the mylar sail

Overall I would buy the boat right away again and it's being used a lot for different purposes.

Besides the Bahia I have a new Laser G-XD and a Dehler 29.

Hans
Hi there. I am new to the Bahia. Can you share how you made the swim ladder and how you attached it to the boat. Since I have the storage box at the back some children encountered difficulty in coming aboard.

Also have you ever had the storage box lid come loose upon a capsize? Am looking for a more secure way of securing the lid because I have lost some equipment and almost a trapeze harness with a capsize yesterday.
 

Alchemist

New Member
Yes, so I have used the Bahia now for about a year. Upwind it is a pretty fast boat and it can go very sharp upwind. I sail about 75% of the time alone. This is very do-able, however when it gets to 18 knots of wind or higher it is a lot of work that might include some swimming. Sailing alone with gennaker is absolutely a lot of fun. When the boat tips over it is easy to right it alone. Only issue I have, I have the storage box and the outboard engine mounted to the back....and there is no way to get back in the boat. I resolved this my putting a piece of rope in a loop on both sides around the beam. I can pull that into the water and step back into the boat. The outboard construction is not great and when you tip over, gas drips out of it and it is also not good for the engine. I also tried an electric engine, but that did not do it for me either. Best is to not have an engine.

It did take me some time to learn how to use the downhaul. The downhaul is really important to get the boat to sail fast.

I think the boat is a bit heavy, but that is related to the material it is build of. My boat lays outside on the dock year round (Dutch climate, ranging from sun to snow) and I have not seen anything change color. I do have the top cover on when I do not use the boat for longer then a month or so. I also made some steps to make sure the boat is not lying on the hull, but it is on two steps, like it is done with the official trailer (needed to keep the warranty)

Bottom line, a very good boat, easy to sail alone or with a family. I sometimes sail in it with the wife and a 3 year old daughter and it is perfect for that also. If you want something very sporty, there are better choices, but this is a good blend of sport, stable and fast

Can you tell me how you resolved getting into the boat? Was the rope with the step secured to the beam or to the back and how was it secured inside the boat?
Also did you ever encounter problems with the storage box lid coming undone during a capsize? It has happened at soem point or another on each time I capsize and I am looking for something more secure.
 

RayG

New Member
I am also new to Bahia, and I've had some problems figuring out the rigging. Does anyone have pictures of what the jib purchase system should look like? I also can't figure out the lower shrouds, so I'd appreciate any help with that as well.
 

Alchemist

New Member
I am also new to Bahia, and I've had some problems figuring out the rigging. Does anyone have pictures of what the jib purchase system should look like? I also can't figure out the lower shrouds, so I'd appreciate any help with that as well.
Here the Bahia's rigging manual. See page 12 for lower shrouds and page 15 for jib purchase system
 

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gosootygo

New Member
Hello everyone!

I have a Bahia, second season now and chuffed with it! I live in Scotland, but the boat is used in Greece in the summer.

I think it's a fantastic boat. I never sail with an engine or oars, but the wind is pretty reliable in Greece in August and I know the local conditions well, so I am getting some amazing trips island-hopping.

Only issue I have is that I can't reliably recover from a capsize when sailing solo. I am quite heavy (100kg) and I am definitely doing the right thing, so I was pretty surprised. But it's not an issue usually, as I'm either with company, or sailing pretty conservatively when solo.

I noticed above that folk are recovering from solo capsizes without problems. What are you doing? I uncleat all sheets, stand on the capsized hull's edge and pull on the centreboard, then stand at the edge of the centreboard once at the 90deg. But I can't get it past that point! The manual gives a minimum crew weight for recovery: I think 150kg. Maybe a bit more tasty souvlaki?
 

Alchemist

New Member
Hello everyone!

I have a Bahia, second season now and chuffed with it! I live in Scotland, but the boat is used in Greece in the summer.

I think it's a fantastic boat. I never sail with an engine or oars, but the wind is pretty reliable in Greece in August and I know the local conditions well, so I am getting some amazing trips island-hopping.

Only issue I have is that I can't reliably recover from a capsize when sailing solo. I am quite heavy (100kg) and I am definitely doing the right thing, so I was pretty surprised. But it's not an issue usually, as I'm either with company, or sailing pretty conservatively when solo.

I noticed above that folk are recovering from solo capsizes without problems. What are you doing? I uncleat all sheets, stand on the capsized hull's edge and pull on the centreboard, then stand at the edge of the centreboard once at the 90deg. But I can't get it past that point! The manual gives a minimum crew weight for recovery: I think 150kg. Maybe a bit more tasty souvlaki?
You should be able to right the Bahia on your own on the centreboard. I actually right it and scoop someone inside the boat from the lower side and it sights easily. If you can only right it up with two people pulling on the centreboard something must be wrong. I would check if there is any water in the ballast tanks of the hull. When the hull is empty the capsized boat sits high on the surface and the righting is really easy. Another help could be holding on to a rope so that you can lean back further out when on centre board.
 

gosootygo

New Member
You should be able to right the Bahia on your own on the centreboard. I actually right it and scoop someone inside the boat from the lower side and it sights easily. If you can only right it up with two people pulling on the centreboard something must be wrong. I would check if there is any water in the ballast tanks of the hull. When the hull is empty the capsized boat sits high on the surface and the righting is really easy. Another help could be holding on to a rope so that you can lean back further out when on centre board.
The hull is totally dry on the inside, so it must be something else. Maybe I need to give more time for the mast to drain of water. Thanks for the idea on the righting lines, I'll go and try that today!
 

Rob Hair

Active Member
I have no experience with the Bahia but many boats, including the Hobie 16 which I do own, have sealed masts. For righting the Hobie its vital to make sure the mast sealing is intact. If your mast takes on water I would get it sealed. Make sure all water is out first!
 
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