Installing a Tiller Tamer, few questions...

Thread starter #1
I've decided that I really want a Tiller Tamer and have a few questions as to how people have installed them.

I plan to install it under the tiller and run the lines back to the transom. On one side the rope will attach to a Harken stainless eyestrap, forward to the tiller, then back to a Seadog roller fairlead cleat.


My question is what is the best method to attach the hardware to the rear transom area. I imagine the transom is hollow and probably thin on the inside liner. I don't like the idea of just screwing the hardware to the thin fiberglass...

Any ideas? Maybe a hollow wall type anchor? Expanding rivets? Some super duper adhesive?

Thanks in advance for any ideas!
 
#2
Here's a couple quick photos of my Tiller Tamer, I used the screws that comes with it and it holds fine. It helps a lot if you sail single handed.

100_2018.jpg 100_2019.jpg
 
#4
To hold the tiller in a fixed position, while you do other things. Such as get a bottle of water,some to eat or trim the sails. And if you are on a long tack, it will kind of hold your course.
 
#5
It holds the tiller in position so when you sail single handed and you have to move forward in the boat to adjust the jib or other things that when the boat rocks from side to side the tiller and rudder don't move back and forth and a possibly you to capsize.
 
Thread starter #6
Jeff, Thanks for the pictures.

I imagine mounting the cleat on the gunwale like you did eliminates my issue with transom mounting the hardware. Although I'm starting to wonder if the transom is NOT hollow. I saw that the motor mounts are through bolted in the area that I'm thinking of using. Maybe there's some "beef" there to hold a screw?
 
#7
On my 1987 model there is no "beef" in there, there is the outer hull and then about a one inch space before the inner "liner. I am talking about the stern of the boat.
 
#8
My "tiller tamer" is velcro on end of adjustable hiking stick and matching velcro on either or both gunwales. Another wrap on aft end of tiller holds hiking stick when not in use. No need for metal or plastic fitting on tiller to snag or poke.
 
#10
I'm starting to wonder if the transom is NOT hollow. I saw that the motor mounts are through bolted in the area that I'm thinking of using. Maybe there's some "beef" there to hold a screw?[/quote]

the area of the transom designed to hold the motor mount is reinforced at the factory. the rest of the transom is pretty hollow.
 
#11
I've decided that I really want a Tiller Tamer and have a few questions as to how people have installed them.

I plan to install it under the tiller and run the lines back to the transom. On one side the rope will attach to a Harken stainless eyestrap, forward to the tiller, then back to a Seadog roller fairlead cleat.


My question is what is the best method to attach the hardware to the rear transom area. I imagine the transom is hollow and probably thin on the inside liner. I don't like the idea of just screwing the hardware to the thin fiberglass...

Any ideas? Maybe a hollow wall type anchor? Expanding rivets? Some super duper adhesive?

Thanks in advance for any ideas!



I tried EddieB's shock cord solution (one of the replys below) last weekend. It works pretty well, but I find that a shok cord attached between the tiller (attached to a small line tied at point of tiller extension) and the Barney Post to be a bit better in holding a course as I go forward to set release the whisker pole. RK











I've decided that I really want a Tiller Tamer and have a few questions as to how people have installed them.

I plan to install it under the tiller and run the lines back to the transom. On one side the rope will attach to a Harken stainless eyestrap, forward to the tiller, then back to a Seadog roller fairlead cleat.


My question is what is the best method to attach the hardware to the rear transom area. I imagine the transom is hollow and probably thin on the inside liner. I don't like the idea of just screwing the hardware to the thin fiberglass...

Any ideas? Maybe a hollow wall type anchor? Expanding rivets? Some super duper adhesive?

Thanks in advance for any ideas!
I've decided that I really want a Tiller Tamer and have a few questions as to how people have installed them.

I plan to install it under the tiller and run the lines back to the transom. On one side the rope will attach to a Harken stainless eyestrap, forward to the tiller, then back to a Seadog roller fairlead cleat.


My question is what is the best method to attach the hardware to the rear transom area. I imagine the transom is hollow and probably thin on the inside liner. I don't like the idea of just screwing the hardware to the thin fiberglass...

Any ideas? Maybe a hollow wall type anchor? Expanding rivets? Some super duper adhesive?

Thanks in advance for any ideas!
 
Thread starter #12
Thanks for all the great replys! If I hadn't already bought the hardware I'd try the velcro or bungee plan. Both sound like they would work well. I installed the transom hardware up high and was pleased to see some wood in the drill swarf. I used large expanding aluminum rivets and some adhesive caulk (to keep moisture out) and am quite pleased with how it turned out. I highly doubt anythings going to pull out of the transom.

Will report back after I have a chance to get it on the water.
 
#13
All good ideas, I don't like to drill in the hull so I just put the traveler on the existing holes at the tran some with a bowline knots and then clip the ends of the tiller tamer line on two the bowline loops. Works fine.
Barry
 
#14
It looks good but it look like it's mounted a little far out on the tiller so that when you turn the tiller it will get a lot of slack. It should be mounted so that the arc is the same when you turn the tiller from side to side. I had to adjust my mounting point on my tiller for the same reason.
 
#15
This is what I use: a small length of shock cord made into a loop which is looped around the rear hiking strap. When you need a third hand to hold the tiller while you go forward, just loop the shock cord around the tiller. Cheap, effective and simple.
View attachment 12484
OK, that's brilliant and has me wondering why I didn't think of this myself. I almost pulled the trigger on the $80 "Tiller Clutch", but this looks a lot better, and since I already have the required bungie cord, it's free!

Nice idea! Thanks for posting this........... 6 years ago. :p

I'd probably use a length of rope instead of bungie, though, as my tiller can have quite a bit of pull on it.
 
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#17
Agreed on the tiller clutch. It's a precision instrument that allows for quick minor adjustments before you leave the helm. And I had installed a small cleat close to the stern on each side of the boat for mooring purposes, these also serve as the tie off points for the clutch. If you're a singlehander as I am, the few extra bucks spent are well worth it!
 
#18
I tried EddieB's shock cord solution (one of the replys below) last weekend. It works pretty well, but I find that a shok cord attached between the tiller and the Barney Post to be a bit better in holding a course as I go forward.
I'm going to try this idea, too.
 
#21
I haven't installed it yet. I had planned to do it last weekend, but got caught up in installing, and then admiring, my new sails instead, and it started getting dark before I could do the clutch install. Getting to Trader Joe's before they closed was more important to me than the Tiller Clutch. :p

Hopefully I'll have time this weekend, or maybe even Friday, if I don't have to work.
 

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#22
Pictures of your install?
Here yah go! Got it done today, then took it out on the water for the first time since putting the new sails on. I think I'm finally done adding improvements to the boat and can actually start sailing now. :p

It takes a little practice, and it helps if the main and jib are balanced well, but the Tiller Clutch held a course long enough to grab a drink, arrange/untangle the lines at my feet, make small adjustments (with both hands), or do pretty much anything requiring two hands to complete.

I really like it!
 

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#23
Here yah go! Got it done today, then took it out on the water for the first time since putting the new sails on. I think I'm finally done adding improvements to the boat and can actually start sailing now. :p

It takes a little practice, and it helps if the main and jib are balanced well, but the Tiller Clutch held a course long enough to grab a drink, arrange/untangle the lines at my feet, make small adjustments (with both hands), or do pretty much anything requiring two hands to complete.

I really like it!
Fantastic job! Sounds like a wonderful day on the water. Thank you for sharing.
 
#24
Here yah go! Got it done today, then took it out on the water for the first time since putting the new sails on. I think I'm finally done adding improvements to the boat and can actually start sailing now. :p

It takes a little practice, and it helps if the main and jib are balanced well, but the Tiller Clutch held a course long enough to grab a drink, arrange/untangle the lines at my feet, make small adjustments (with both hands), or do pretty much anything requiring two hands to complete.

I really like it!
These things are awesome... I've got 'em on two other boats and may splurge and buy one for my 14.2 as well.
 
#25
I love mine also, $$$ well spent! One thing to beware of is to keep the good tension on your retainer line. If you don't the line can become accidentally looped around the trigger and you can't even see it at first glance! I got preoccupied recently while in some robust sailing conditions and when I came about the helm stayed frozen in the turn! Did a complete circle before I figured out what had happened and only by instinct was able to keep Capri from going over. I was close enough to shore to provide some good entertainment to those nearby. Quickly undid the snag and carried on. A lesson learned!!!!!
 
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