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ILCA Class Rules : "tied" vs "knotted" - what is the difference ?

DanRom624

New Member
Hello everyone.

I am not a native English speaker, and have a question regarding the correct interpretation of the term "tied" referred to control lines, used throughout the ILCA Class Rules Part 2, sometimes in conjunction with the term "knotted".
Does "tie" include the case of binding a line by means of a shackle, or a nylon hook? Or "tied" implies necessarily that the binding must be done by means of a knot? If that so, why does rule 3.c repeatedly mention "knotted or tied"? What is the difference between the two terms, then?

More specifically, rule 3.b.x allows (among others) to "tie" the free end of the Vang to the centreboard handle.
Can that binding (tie) be made by means of a nylon hook, or shall be exclusively a knot?

Thank you all four your kind attention and support.
D
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
"Tied" means that the line is attached to something with a knot. "Knotted" means that it isn't, but has a stopper knot.

The free end of a control line may be attached to the centreboard handle only by tying. No hooks (or anything else, either).

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DanRom624

New Member
Thank you Lali
It does make sense, now ! :)

Truth is that in my language, the two words (knotted / tied) translate with the same (one) word... "annodato"
To circumvent the problem, the latest translation of the Class Rules (dated 2011, they don't translate them any longer) use "fissato" for "tied", but "fissato" sounds like "fixed" or "bound", which may include the use of a hook, if interpreted literarily.

For a proper translation, I believe that we should use a paraphrase, such as "fissato con un nodo" (i.e.: tied with a knot), vs "con l'estremità annodata" (i.e.: with a stopper knot)... or something similar.

Ok, I do not expect you to understand... ahahah :)
The important fact is that it is all clear to me now.
Thank you again
D
 
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LaLi

Well-Known Member
Well, I am a third-language English speaker myself :rolleyes: In my native language, the verb is "solmia", so you would have to express the difference by "kiinnittää solmimalla" vs. "tehdä solmu" :confused:

I was actually involved in translating the RRS a long time ago, but I don't think anyone has tried translating any class rules for a long time over here.

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