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Homemade daggerboard options

Noodles

New Member
I recently inherited an Aquafinn, which I believe is the same class as the sunny I used to sail at summer camp every year. However, it's missing the daggerboard. I have a copy of the dimentions, and since I'm not interested in keeping it "race legal", I'd like to look at making one myself. I can't see spending factory cost for an original, and most places like ebay are still more than I'd like to pay.
I make furniture as a hobby, so skill and tools aren't the issue. Here are my questions -
Since my plans are from The Sunfish Book, are they interchangeable with an Aquafinn? Any suggestions on what wood to use, marine plywood, white oak, teak, etc? I'd like to stick to common wood if possible. Any other suggestions or comments are appreciated.
 

supercub

Member
Noodles,
Go to the ISCA rules on the Class Home Page, All dimensions for both the old round bottom and new Barrington boards (better performing) are there. Measure the fore/aft dimension of your daggerboard well and adjust accordingly if diffeent from the SF dimension. Mahogany (Phillipine I think) is the usual wood used, but any tight grian hardwood can be used. Suggest a rounded leading edge and tapered traing edge as shown in the SF Bible. Finish with a clear fiberglass wrap and you will have a long lasting, minimal maintainence finish for your board. Good Luck.
 

Noodles

New Member
Thanks, Supercub. My original idea was mahogany, teak or other hardwood as you suggested. When I saw the overall thickness of only 27/32 ( especially with the aft end knifed), I was concerned about cupping or twisting. I couldn't remember whether the ones I had seen before were laminated or not. I had not considered the clear fiberglass, though, I had only intended to varnish/shellac the crap out of it. Good idea.
Thank you again.
 

supercub

Member
Noodles,

The 27/32" thickness is a little more than 3/4" on a 9-1/2" wide by 40-1/4" long board which is plenty strong enough for general use, even when made of white pine (mahogany is much stronger). Only about 27" (+/-) is sticking out the bottom and only 1-1/4" of the edge is shaped. Just to see how strong a piece of pine was :confused: , I placed a piece of 1 x 10 (actual dimensions about 3/4" x 9-1/2') on a concrete curb, parked my truck over it with about 30" sticking out and then jumped up and down on it until it broke (about 3 :( times until I hear it crack). I weigh about 190 lbs. Since you will not be jumping on it and just doing a pull up to right your boat after capsize, with a mahogangy/fiberglass wrapped board, I do not feel you have much to worry about. The originals are just varnished and seldom break (yes I know some have broken).
 
Supercub,

You must have really needed something to do. I have this picture in my mind.....all your neighbors are watching out their windows.....you trying to use the curb to catapult your truck :D Thanks for a good laugh this morning.

The good news is that there was some practical empirical data collected here. I figure that a 2x10 mounted to the rear deck of an old tartan 27 would make a great diving board!
 

Al Court

Al Court
Noodles,

I make my own wooden parts. I'd say your choices are African, or Central American Mahogany. I wouldn't consider any other species. When choosing a board, make sure the annual rings pass through the board at right angles, or as close to it as possible. I like to attach the stops at the top of the board with dowels instead of screws. As far as a finish goes, I use an expensive 2 part urethane thats good for about 25 yrs. I'm going on vacation today, so I'll be away from my computer for the next 8 days.

Al Courtines- woodworking teacher Cotuitbreeze@aol.com
 

Noodles

New Member
Thanks all for the advice. And Supercub, I had the same image of you trying to fling your truck into your neighbor’s yard. :)
I realized my hesitancy on making it myself – the top view (section B-B, if you have the diagram memorized) showed the aft end shaped to a much more drastic edge than I was comfortable with. After reading your post, and reviewing the diagram further, I realized this was the top view of the urethane board only. Hat tip.
A local lumberyard had African Mahogany for $3.50/bf. I went there this afternoon and picked up an 8’ stick (shortest they’d sell), and I’ll make the first one sometime in the next couple weeks. I’ll have enough left for a second, if anyone is interested in helping me recoup my costs. It won’t be sanctioned, but dang it’ll look nice. I can even cut some trailing flames into it.
 

supercub

Member
Noddles,

If you want to get fancy with "trailing flames" and such, inlay the board with the design using natural, stained or dyed woods. If you use dye, use dye that does not fade (I forget which type). The Cedar Strip Canoe/Kayak guys have lots of tips and tricks for doing inlays.

As far as trying to flip my truck ( a '89 Chevy 1 Ton) with that old shelf board, I can see how you guys imagined it :D . I did the little experiment in my carport. The "curb" was actually a solid concrete block. I used one of my 6 x 6 ramps I use to level the truck or trailer to get on top of the block. I then backed up the ramp until the rear tire was centered over the board. And then I started jumping :) ,you know the rest. I was actually a little surprized on how strong the pine board was, it bent quite a bit before it cracked

Glad you guys had a little fun.
 

supercub

Member
Noodles,

Page 43 of the SF Bible (Chapt 3) starts a discussion on reshaping the leading and trailing edges (diagram on page 44). You may be able to use a router to shape the edges.
 

mike4947

Member
Just another thought, when they designed the new plastic dagger board they lengthened it about 4 inches as the wooden boards didn't have enough area for the size of the boat.
I wouldn't hurt and would help sailing to extend your home made board several inches.
 

jmgardner

Member
Noodles said:
I’ll have enough left for a second, if anyone is interested in helping me recoup my costs. It won’t be sanctioned, but dang it’ll look nice. I can even cut some trailing flames into it.
Noodles:
I'll buy it at a 'reasonable' price (whatever that might be...) and as I'm unsanctioned it won't matter to me if it's a little longer as posted below...

Thanks
 

Noodles

New Member
One more question - how much of a bevel do the edges get? Again, not having seen one in several years is hampering me. The diagram says the bevel begins on the flat sides 1.25" from the edges, but how close do they meet ON the edges? Halfway on both sides, making a sharp blade? One quarter, making a blunt edge? Somewhere in between? Or is it mostly up to my descretion? Or does it really matter in the grand scheme of things, considering my sailing partner is not yet four years old?

JM, once it's done, I'll float a quote over to you. Flames and "SS" logo extra. ;)
 

Al Court

Al Court
Noodles,

I'm rolling in laughter... Where's this "lumberyard" selling genuine mahogany @ $3.50/ bf ? Either he doesn't know what he has, or he's B.S.ing you! It should be closer to $8-9.00/bf. Have a great day!

Al Courtines
 

Al Court

Al Court
snfish,

Are you following all of this? How are you making out with the reinforced, African Mahogany rudders I sold you?

Al
 

Al Court

Al Court
Anyone,

Several months ago I suggested there's many well meaning people on this site. The problem is, as George Carlin said, " There's people who know... People who don't know... And people who don't know they don't know!

To all concerned, Happy Sailing!
 

Al Court

Al Court
???

Is there anyone out there who has actually inlayed their wooden parts with artistic designs other than myself? Sorry, I continue to roll with laughter!!!


Al Courtines Cotuitbreeze2aol.com
 

Noodles

New Member
Al,
Having lived in Central America for several years, and having purchased and worked on several hundred board feet of Honduran Mahogany (and cocobolo, purpleheart, and several others), I'm fairly confident that I got SOMETHING in the mahogany family. But, never having actually seen African Mahogany, I checked here just to be sure <http://www.exotichardwoods-africa.com/mahoganyafrican.htm>, and it appears to be what I asked for. It helps to have friends in the business. And it helps to live in a place less expensive than Western Mass. And sometimes it pays to simply be nice. He even planed it S2S for free. You have a nice day too.
 

Al Court

Al Court
Noodles,

You're lucky to have an "in" in the tropical hardwoods industry. Not being aware of this you can understand why I seriously doubted you were getting what you were told @ $3.50/ bf.

Al Courtines
 

MARKD

New Member
Check out Tosh Custom Boatworks.They make all kinds of daggerboards and rudders for all kinds of sailboats.The prices are real cheap.
 
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