Frozen bailer

Thread starter #1
The 1968 sunfish I purchased has a coroded bailer that resists any effort to move it. I have tried soaking it for two nights with Blaster but that didn't help... . Any suggestions would be greatly appreceated
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#2
PB Blaster is designed to "creep". Soak it again, and set up internal mini-shocks by tapping it lightly with a tack hammer. I'd suggest heating it, but the plastic internal parts might be hard to find.
 

oldpaint

Active Member
#3
Keep it soaked for a few more days and tap it with a hammer a few times a day as Light and variable suggests before thinking about cutting it off. If it was a salt water boat there can be an enormous amount of corrosion.

On car parts that are really stuck I like to spray it on 4 days before I anticipate getting started on a repair. The interesting thing is that the stuff continues to work long after you would expect it to. I tried to remove exhaust tips from a tailpipe that I cut out of a car. The blaster didn't do anything for a week, so I sprayed the set screws and set it aside for a month....nothing. Sprayed again....let it sit for two months.....nothing. Sprayed it again and forgot about it for three months. The set screws came out easily then.
 
Thread starter #5
Keep it soaked for a few more days and tap it with a hammer a few times a day as Light and variable suggests before thinking about cutting it off. If it was a salt water boat there can be an enormous amount of corrosion.

On car parts that are really stuck I like to spray it on 4 days before I anticipate getting started on a repair. The interesting thing is that the stuff continues to work long after you would expect it to. I tried to remove exhaust tips from a tailpipe that I cut out of a car. The blaster didn't do anything for a week, so I sprayed the set screws and set it aside for a month....nothing. Sprayed again....let it sit for two months.....nothing. Sprayed it again and forgot about it for three months. The set screws came out easily then.
Salt Water boat and the plug is brass..Other then that a fellow kayak instructor who owned a fiberglass company says the sucker is in great shape... We cut inspection ports... and the 48 year old foam blocks are dry. First bailer I ever had was a cut off bleach bottle... and at age 83 it may also be the last..Hey grab life while you can . She sets sail tomorrow along the gulf coast
 
#6
The cast aluminum nut that holds the bailer in place is a 36 mm hex nut, After years of trying to get these metal bailer assemblies apart, I finally bought a 1/2 drive 24" long
breaker bar with swivel head from Harbor Freight (about $7) and a 36 mm deep socket from NAPA (about $12) Then I soak the bailer threads with penetrating oil apply the breaker bar/socket rig and so far I am three for three for removing the nut without damage to the nut or bailer threads. If you are just doing one, borrow the tools from a friend who has them. If you don't have such a friend, cultivate one.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY L1030997.JPG
 
Thread starter #7
The cast aluminum nut that holds the bailer in place is a 36 mm hex nut, After years of trying to get these metal bailer assemblies apart, I finally bought a 1/2 drive 24" long
breaker bar with swivel head from Harbor Freight (about $7) and a 36 mm deep socket from NAPA (about $12) Then I soak the bailer threads with penetrating oil apply the breaker bar/socket rig and so far I am three for three for removing the nut without damage to the nut or bailer threads. If you are just doing one, borrow the tools from a friend who has them. If you don't have such a friend, cultivate one.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY View attachment 21242
Unable to move the top piece on the old bailer..it is corroded..is this where you apply the wrench or is this piece supposed to go up and down?
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#9
Unable to move the top piece on the old bailer..it is corroded..is this where you apply the wrench or is this piece supposed to go up and down?
I have no experience with the DePersia bailer, :( but I think the reason Alan S. Glos suggested the ½" breaker bar—with the 36mm socket—is to allow enough "internal clearance" to get the socket over the plug. A smaller socket won't fit. :confused:

With a 3/8" breaker bar, try a 36mm oil filter socket :cool: as it's made of thinner material, and may have the clearance that's needed. The lip of whichever oil filter socket you find may be too fat :oops: and need to be ground-off on/with a grinding wheel; otherwise, it won't have enough "purchase" to sufficiently grasp the nut.

European cars are frequent users of large 36mm sockets. :)
 

Webfoot1

Active Member
#10
I believe what Water Rat is referring to is that the bailer plug is
frozen. If you can't remove the plug you will not be able to get
a socket on the nut below it. It's not uncommon to have to cut the
top of the plug off with a cutting wheel and then split the nut. Kind
of bummer since the bailer plugs go for between $40 and $60 on
E-Bay. Before doing that I'd put a pair of Vice-Grips on the plug and
see if I could work it back and forth.
 
Thread starter #11
Again guys many thanks. The bailer plug is frozen in what appears to be an up position....I have had some strong people try to move it w pipe wrench ..but it didn't budge... If I can get it unfrozen the bailer may be o.k. once it is given a bath in blaster.
 

mixmkr

Active Member
#13
Plan on a 2nd person holding the scoop as a socket on a frozen cockpit side nut will probably spin the entire bailer as well. You'll probaby scar tbe spinoff plug also trying with force to unscrew it with a pipe wrench etc
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#14
Sounds like a situation for a special kind of wrench. I'll look it up the details of the DePersia later, as I'm busy with the estate sale of James A Walgreen. (You may have bought aspirin from him). ;)

In the meantime, is this 36mm "crows foot" an option?

 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#17
No the cap needs to come off first regardless of how you grab tbe nut

Jeepers, the tolerance is close. :eek:

Is it worth grinding off the plug's knurled edges to save an $87 metal bailer? (I think it is). :cool:
The plug is made of brass, so a new surface (knurled surface) can be soldered or brazed on. :cool:

A 12-point socket would be an easier "fit" than a 6-point socket...But I'd tap it with the 6-point socket to find where to grind the plug. Or grind the interior of the 36mm socket/crow's foot to fit? Turning simultaneously with a pipe wrench and crow's foot would help to loosen the whole works. I'd even pry it out, to work on it later, and fix the fiberglass later! :eek:

A different wrench to heat and bend to fit? Five minutes on a grinder?





If it were mine, I'd "spray and pray". :( (Maybe use a hammer and chisel to drive the nut in the correct direction—lefty-loosey).
 
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Thread starter #18
again many thanks..No wind to speak of for a week so I'll use blaster and lime away((attacks rust) for that period before cuting into the sucker. Other then that the hull is in good shape...took care of stress cracks..one small hole...and installed inspection ports.. Foam is dry..and nothing shakes rattles or rolls....deck fitings are tight...for a 68 its it's in great shape.
 

Webfoot1

Active Member
#19
It's not the metal bailer worth all that money, it's the Brass Plug. Go to E-bay
and check it out. I usually find metal bailers for about $25. On a positive note
you can get a brass drain plug and retention nut that fits at the hardware store.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#20
again many thanks..No wind to speak of for a week so I'll use blaster and lime away((attacks rust) for that period before cutting into the sucker. Other than that the hull is in good shape...took care of stress cracks..one small hole...and installed inspection ports.. Foam is dry..and nothing shakes rattles or rolls....deck fittings are tight...for a 68 its it's in great shape.
For two days, the wind has been fierce here! :eek: Stored, as it is, near the water, if there was any water in the cockpit, it'd be blown out by now. :confused:

Now I've seen another view—and had a nap ;) to think on this...a view of the closed bailer:


If nothing else works (though I think spraying & praying & waiting will) :cool: it looks like you could take a Sawz-All to the knurled part of the plug, cut it off, use the 36mm socket to remove the nut, and reattach the knurled part back on later. (With flux, solder or braze).
 
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