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Capri Omega 14 measurements for new mast hardware.

Fred Rose

New Member
I replaced the original broken mast with a salvaged mast from another design. It is very similar in cross section but I'm wondering about overall length and stay and jib hardware attachment locations. Ideas?
 

Jim Basque

New Member
I just bought a neglected but original (I think) 1971 Omega 14, #494. My first sailboat. The mast measures 19'7" long, not including the hardware at each end, and the boom measures 8'9" not including end hardware. I have attached some pics including hull with fittings. As you can see, hull is getting some repair due to rotted transom and brittle fiberglass. I'd be happy to provide any other info. Jim
 

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Fred Rose

New Member
Thanks for the inf. I had to re-mast the boat. If you could make measurements within 1/8 of an inch for the locations of the stays from the mast top (end of the extrusion, not the pulleys) that will help me attach the mounting brackets for the cables.
In exchange I can send pix of my boat with the curved oars that stow in the cockpit.
I really enjoy the old C14 Omega and it has had lots of adventures for the last 40 years after I salvaged her. Since I sail inland lakes I like the open bow layout and don't worry about waves coming in.
BTW I have a copy of the original manuals if you need them.
 

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Fred Rose

New Member
Thanks, measurements are very helpful.
The oar shafts are made from 2x2 clear pine cut lengthwise and epoxy glued into a form shape matching the cockpit floor. They are planed and sanded into a rounded profile.

The oar blades are fiber glassed, not so neatly, into a fared shape. They are specific to port and starboard. Oar pins need to be clamp on because now the oars cant be twisted into the wind like straight oars. The pins go into brass sockets that I made. I can sit on an ice chest or a board seat for rowing.

The oars are stowed in simple aluminum brackets made from hardware store 1/2 in stock. They fit securely and do not interfere with
hiking straps.

With rig up into a light breeze the boat moves slowly. Sail down, the speed is much better but the boom gets in the way. I'm looking into putting my 50 pound thrust Minkota trolling motor on the stern. It would be cool to mount the motor into a new rudder blade?

I made the simple boarding assist ladder from aluminum bar and ABS plastic or teak steps. If the bottom step falls down during transport it is too short to drag the pavement. The frame is fastened into the stern with rubber expansion plugs.

The trailer has tall side posts made from muffler pipe stock to help catch position the boat back onto the trailer. They are tall enough to carry my Laser on top and launch the Capri into the water with the mast down.

I live in eastern Kansas. There used to be active O 14 fleets near Topeka and Wichita and the Ozarks.. We have many nice lakes to visit but the easternmost ones are muddy. West of Topeka in the Flint Hills they are clearer. Lots of rain this year.
F F
 

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Jim Basque

New Member
Thanks Fred for the great pics and info. Cool oars. Your boat is in a whole lot better shape than mine. I am going to add oarlocks. I live in New Smyrna Beach, Florida next to the Intracoastal Waterway. That is where I will be sailing once I complete my repairs. I did go float my boat last week to ,make sure no leaks into hull from centerboard slot or elsewhere. Bone dry so that is a a relief. Good luck to you.

Jim
 

Fred Rose

New Member
When I found my 1987? Capri it was in an add for free sailboat to worthy person. Since I had 2 sons in scouting and I was a leader I went over to check it out. There it sat on the trailer with flat tires. The hull was full of debris to the top from trees covering it. The top of the sail bag was barely visible and the mahogany wood was ruined. There were 8 cheap life jackets included inside the hull! The owner tried to sail with too many on board and after a divorce and awhile gave up and his new wife didn't like sailing. We concluded the transaction for $1.00 and I pumped up the tires and towed the boat 1 mile home on squeaking wheel bearings. The old wood was used for patterns to make new mahogany parts.The sails and lines were in very good shape and after the axle rebuild we were sailing on nearby lakes.

Well, I'm having fun looking over my Capri 14 folder.

I want to mention a trick about raising the mast single handed. At the launch area, point the bow downhill before you start. You are inside the boat while raising the mast. Start at back of the cockpit and balance the mast so the heel is in the mast step. Make certain the stays and lines won't snag anything. Raise the mast up. The mast stays on each side will keep the mast from falling too far forward and gravity will help keep it in place. Carefully slip around the upright mast and place the keeper pin in the jib stay shackle. I surprised my self when I discovered could do this at anchor!

I've sailed this boat in Kansas March thru November. In winds up to 15 or so it is a dry boat depending on trim. Like all smaller sailboats it is sensitive to where the load is placed in the hull -weight a little forward for upwind to increase waterline but not so much so much as not to pound the bows, aft a little when planing. The boat handles well in light air also when trimmed out properly (not too heavy) with a looser main sail. I added a whisker pole to help the jib sail with downwind sailing. A tiller handle extension is a useful item also.

I also rake the centerboard aft a few degrees rather than have it in the full perpendicular. Too much rake when sailing downwind is faster but might cause you to dump the boat. If this happens get a float under the top of the mast so it won't roll upside down. I weigh 160 lbs and can bring it upright by myself. Check the lines and let the boat point into the wind and sails flap as it rolls back up. Always sail this boat with your back to the wind direction (windward side).
I love the full open cockpit of this 1981 model . Resist the temptation to overload it. It is also a good boat for a sunset cruse with a cooler, beverages and sandwiches.

Release the 3 pins that hold the mast stays add the trolling motor and you have a fine fishing boat!

This Capri 14 is a keeper because small boats get sailed more. .
 
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