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2:1 main sheeting system now legal!

Fremont

Member
So first of all, I'm stealing Lee Montes' thunder with this, by posting his youtube video about it, sorry Lee, I love your channel, hey fish folks, go subscribe to Lee's youtube channel!
But this is great. I find it easier to hold onto my Hobie's mainsheet than the Sunfish, but the Hobie has a 6:1 block (my H17 had an 8:1 block as I recall). So this is something I'm definitely changing.
I thought about changing the whole block system so the mainsheet comes off the traveler. OK, not legal for racing, but other than that, is there a reason not to? I'm still learning a lot about sailing Sunfishys.
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
ISCA approved this modification (2019 Bonaire meeting), but I don't think that World Sailing has.
If not, the system won't be race legal and I won't spend the money...

This also applies to the digital compass AFAIK, but I am not part of the 'inner workings' of the class and may not be up-to-date...
 

mixmkr

Well-Known Member
As an additional upgrade, since the doubled part may weigh things down in light air, you could use some double braid 5/16 line and remove the core for about 10-15 feet. That would still allow larger diameter for gripping on the sheeting end and a much smaller and lighter on the boom end...also feeding thru the aft blocks better too.
I see this a lot on cruising boat furler drums, for a similar reasons.
 

chris williams

Active Member
ISCA approved this modification (2019 Bonaire meeting), but I don't think that World Sailing has.
If not, the system won't be race legal and I won't spend the money...
This also applies to the digital compass AFAIK, but I am not part of the 'inner workings' of the class and may not be up-to-date...
I am the former head of the ISCA Advisory Council and still keep in touch with the class leaders. As you may know, World Sailing has gotten themselves into a lot of financial trouble and have stretched themselves very thin as a result. As a result, they are way behind on a lot of things, and as result they gave ISCA the go-ahead to "self-approve" rules changes. I heard the changes would be effective on Jan 1, but I have not seen them on our website.

I tested out the loooong sheet approach a few years ago. I believe youth sailors in Curacao like the extra purchase and suggested the change. While the pull on the sheet is much reduced going upwind, it comes with a tradeoff. It becomes very hard to sheet in quickly at the start or at leeward mark roundings as you have to pull in a lot of sheet. It also makes pumping offwind much less effective. I'd try to borrow a long sheet to see what you think before buying one. Also, if you are in a race approaching a leeward mark and someone with the extra purchase is ahead of you, I would try very hard not to round outside them as it may take them a while to get sheeted in and going upwind!
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
For those who didn't view the above video, Lee Montes displays one of his masts that fractured at the site of a sheet metal screw.

This type of attachment (screw) normally is used to attach the prime halyard cleat to the mast. The now "relaxed" halyard is tied off to the deck cleat. (To secure the rig from loss).

I'd previously recommended using only adhesive, rather than weaken the mast. :oops:

Here, Lee is recommending a "cleatless" remedy. (The red line in the video).

Pretty clever! :cool:
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
you could use some double braid 5/16 line and remove the core for about 10-15 feet. That would still allow larger diameter for gripping on the sheeting end and a much smaller and lighter on the boom end...also feeding thru the aft blocks better too.
Good idea, but illegal. "Each sheet or line must be one continuous length of line of uniform diameter." (CR 3.7) :rolleyes:

World Sailing ... gave ISCA the go-ahead to "self-approve" rules changes. I heard the changes would be effective on Jan 1, but I have not seen them on our website.
A class rule is in force only when it's incorporated in the complete rule document, and/or published as an amendment on the WS site.

I have seen a not-so-competent leadership of another class decide publicly on rule changes but not actually write or publish them for years. The sailors and measurers alike were pretty lost about what was legal. I'm sure ISCA knows and does better.

_
 

Alan S. Glos

Well-Known Member
Just a footnote: I have been racing Sunfish extensively for 30+ years and was one of the mast cleat early adopters. I have never had any mast damage problems as a result of the mast cleat. But I do not sail my boat in salt water. When you put a screw through the side of an anodized aluminum mast and then marinate the area in salt water, you may have problems; fresh water? - not so much. It is not the only problem, but salt water is harder on Sunfish spars than fresh water.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY

PO.S.I love Lee's videos.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Let's see, at some point, the sail momentarily takes a really heavy load--so...my guesswork follows:

1) The spars bend a lot,
2) The mast bends a little,
3) The halyard (now much shorter) pulls,
4) The mast cleat bends or strains,
5) Loading of lower screw is greater,
6) Mast ($150) fractures at the lower screw location...
:eek:

While an adhesive would have been better, the factory's ("effective-length") original halyard would've taken some of the shock-load off the mast. (And "dumped" some wind--saving the mast). :oops:

Lee's red cord, as seen in the above video, is the logical choice.
 
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