Laser Trailer Opinions

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by hushoe12, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. hushoe12

    hushoe12 New Member

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    I am currently in the process of looking for a new trailer for my laser. I am looking at the Kittyhawk trailers and the new Righton trailer. If anyone has some good information and opinions regarding these trailers please let me know! Thanks!
     
  2. Vorpal

    Vorpal New Member

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    I really like my Right-On trailer. Very easy to load and unload. Plus I believe they have just developed an add-on structure to carry a second Laser.
     
  3. akochen

    akochen New Member

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    I also am very happy with my RIght On Trailer. I can easily load the boat on and off by myself.
     
  4. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    When I bought my (third hand) Laser, it came with a Trailex trailer. The latter is a fine piece of equipment, but if I had to buy a trailer again, the Right-On would be first on my list. One advantage is that the wheels never get into the water when launching from a ramp because a dolly is used to launch the boat. This makes bearing maintenance less of a problem. And it's a lot less expensive than the Trailex.
    Note though that the Right-On trailer still has to build up a record as far as durability is concerned.
     
  5. gouvernail

    gouvernail Active Member

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    It has now been used for eleven seasons and thre are so many times when we decided to fill the thing and go to a regata that I am certain, it has helped build friendships and ...are the locals ever excited when somebody pulls into the club's rigging area with FIVE MORE BOATS!!!

    Ours if far from perfect but it functions. The local kids borrow it a coule times a year or more to go to junior events...more kid sailors with fewer cars needed to make the trip and sometimes kids that would not ahve gone at all!!

    Sure, by the time I put brakes on it and a control module in my vehicle I had blown $2500, we have replaced the tires twice ($400 total) , and after ten seasons I spent $500 on materials to re-deck, recarpet, re-light, re-fasten, and paint it last year but I think we are down under $25 per use and way under $10 per sailor per regatta...and after the rebuild it is good for another ten years.

    If you have a vehicle capable of towing a couple thousand pounds, the multiple boat trailer is simply great for friends who want to sail.

    And building one is a great way for sailors to get together during the winter!!

    Here is the trailer on a trip where we took SIX boats!!! In fact, teh weather was so bad we didn't sail but comaraderie and the New Orleans Food made the trip worthwhile anyway!!

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Laughing_Jakal

    Laughing_Jakal New Member

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    I have a KittyHawk Stainless Steel trailer that I like quite a bit. Superb shape! I'm putting it up for sale because I have two and am now constructing a multi-laser trailer. I'm looking for $650.00 OBO.

    The KittyHawk is the way to go if you launch from a ramp, packed sand,gravel or grass. I've pulled a laser on a KittyHawk from Racine Wisconsin to South Florida and it tows at high-speed like a dream.

    Its weakness is in dry, loose, sand where you'll need two people and I wouldn't recommend it if you launch on the loose sand regularly. If its just a few times a year, then the convenience far outweighs the hassle of asking for a hand pulling it up the beach. Once you're up the beach, you won't need help hoisting the boat onto a regular trailer.

    The strengths are that it supports the boat under the gunnwhales and bow, but you don't need to transfer to a trailer to transport, just hookup and go. It really is a solo solution when not in sand and makes the post regatta boat clean-up a breeze. When you get home, there is no need to transfer off the trailer to a suitable support, just roll it into place.

    If I know the venue won't be a sandy launch....I'll take the Kitty Hawk.

    I'll be going to Florida Masters and can deliver it there or you can come to Memphis, TN, or we can meet somewhere.
     
  7. Rob B

    Rob B Active Member

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    2nd this. Kitty Hawk w/a pivot bow fitting makes it soooo easy to transfer from trailer to dolly on your own if you wish. Also it is MADE to be a boat trailer and dumped in water. There are braces available from APS that makes 2 boats fit on the trailer great as well. Back in the day I ran mine up to 110 mph behind my 300ZX. It always towed like a dream!
     
  8. Nextcast

    Nextcast New Member

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    One more vote for the KittyHawk. The ability to single-handely move the boat from the trailer to my dolly, or to lauch directly from the trailer when I choose is huge for me.

    I struggled with the same question roughly a year ago. I think all three of the major tailored-to-Laser trailers have their plusses. It is nice to have ready made choices that will suit most of us! I am not sure you can go "wrong" with any of the top three.
     
  9. stick

    stick Member

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    i am a huge kittyhawk fan also. I take my sietech dolly strapped on top of boat when trailering. The transfer from kitty to dolly is one person. Not sure what the other versions weigh, but there has got to be gas savings over the heavier flatbed trailer that are modified to hold a laser. And you still need to transfer onto a dolly anyway( the k-hawk is not ideal in sandy or loose soil conditions). The kitty is custom designed to hold your laser in safest position, and allow the swivel-out self load, and the kitty can be a dolly in hard surface situations. +++
     
  10. dhillmyer

    dhillmyer New Member

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    Kitty Hawk all the way. Simple, easy, and well built. I figure I have about 7000 miles on mine, and not even one issue at all. I just decided to inspect and repack the bearings. I thought I might have to at least replace some of the parts but they we're all in like new condition. I routinely carry two lasers on it as well.

    Dave
    191963
     
  11. cjj

    cjj 196064

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    I like my Right On trailer. Bought it earlier this year. Loading / unloading singlehanded couldn't be easier! Loaded it is easy to move around the yard by hand. Empty trailer doesn't take up much storage space. Owner, Michael Carlson, is very professional and easy to work with. Keep in mind assembly takes about 4 hrs. Everything considered, I highly recommend this solution.
     
  12. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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    Definite Kitty Hawk fan here. I find it easy for getting the bottom cover on. I just spread the cover out on the trailer before I load the boat. It saves me a lot of time.
     
  13. tern

    tern New Member

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    Another question for owners of the stainless Kittyhawk trailer:

    They mention that the rims are galvanized. What other parts are not stainless or plastic?

    I can't imaging that the bearings are stainless. How about hubs, etc?

    Is it really something that you can use to drop a boat into salt water and expect to last with basic rinsing?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  14. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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    The frame of the trailer, the axle and most of the mounting hardware are stainless steel. The bow pivot, coupler, fenders, and rims are galvanized. The leaf springs are painted black.

    The hub assembly is a standard assembly like you would find on just about any trailer. If you put the trailer in salt water, you'll want to install Bearing Buddies and regularly re-pack the bearings just like a normal trailer.

    The stainless steel trailer is not maintenance free. The main advantage of the stainless steel is the structural framework won't corrode if left outside (or dunked in salt water). The parts that may corrode, like the leaf springs, are standardized parts and can be easily replaced.
     
  15. tern

    tern New Member

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    Thanks, torrid.

    That's exactly the answer I was looking for.
     
  16. Lazzzerrr

    Lazzzerrr Member

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    Does anyone have a homemade 2 boat trailer??? I have a single boat trailer right now... It's not a kittyhawk or anything like that... It's a heavy duty trailer... I would like to find a way to haul 2 boats around at the same time... Help?? Comments?? Pictures??
     
  17. tern

    tern New Member

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  18. Pedal-Force

    Pedal-Force Member

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    Slightly off topic, but I'm wondering what kind of trailer lights the Kitty Hawk and other main trailers use.

    I'm ordering my hitch and stuff today, but I don't actually have my Laser yet, I'm still shopping. I know everything except what kind of light connector I need to order.
     
  19. Braecrest

    Braecrest Member

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    Pedal Force:

    the predominate type of trailer wiring connector is a "Four wire flat" I don't have a kitty hawk but my trailerex boat trailer, wesco boat trailer, and two other trailers all use that same connector. Its pretty standard, and if the trailer is differant the trailer can be easily converted for about $10 in parts and 15 minutes of time.
     
  20. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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    If you're buying a new Kitty Hawk, do yourself a favor and run by a trailer parts store first. Pick up a set of LED lights and install those instead.
     

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