Laser Trailer Opinions

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by hushoe12, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. Pedal-Force

    Pedal-Force Member

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    Thanks. I'm still shopping for my Laser. I've found a few locally. One I think is overpriced, plus comes with a Radial that I don't need. The second needs upgrades and a new sail, but comes with a trailer. The third is the same price as the second, but is in great shape, but comes with a dolly instead of a trailer.

    In order to get the 3rd one I'll need to buy a trailer. I also am in the process of buying a hitch for my car.
     
  2. 154537

    154537 Member

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    the problem with the right on trailer is that it puts all the pressure of the strapped down boat on the crappy plastic parts of the seitech. this is not what the seitech was designed for. the flanges that hold up the gunnels of the boat do break...

    kitty hawk or trailex is the way to go, imo
     
  3. Pedal-Force

    Pedal-Force Member

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    Actually, if you read the literature for the Right-On (which I've done, because I bought one), it tells you to put the gunnel flanges down and let the boat rest on the strap when trailering.

    I think that strap is plenty strong for a 130 pound laser. It's not like you're strapping it down with a hydraulic ram. You shouldn't be strapping it super tight anyway because the boat isn't all that strong.
     
  4. 154537

    154537 Member

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    ok, well if the boat is resting on the strap than the "right on" is inferior because the boat rests on the strap. youre right, the boat isnt that strong, but the strongest part is the hull deck joint- which is where the pressure rests when you use a kitty hawk.

    either way, the boat needs to be strapped down to a certain degree of tightness to avoid movement during normal road driving bumps and pot holes. whether its on the seitech's straps or gunnel flange, its still relying on the cheap chinese plastic parts of the seitech, which is outside the specs of that dolly. seitech's are not that durable. they are terribly overpriced, perhaps more so than the sail!

    i prefer my boat to rest on its gunnels on the strong, american built (yes thats right MADE IN THE USA) kitty hawk.
     
  5. Rob B

    Rob B Active Member

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    The "Right on" trailer does offer ease of use and it can be used for multiple purposes, (except for towing 2 lasers). However, you better store it in your garage because there is not one single galvanized or stainless steel part on it. I give them 4 years, (of decent use and exposure to the elements) to start rusting up. I also don't like the idea of towing the laser around on the dolly strap, but that's just a personal thing.
     
  6. Pedal-Force

    Pedal-Force Member

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    I guess we'll find out. Mine will be stored outside, for now at least. I have a condo, so it will be outside until I get a house.

    It's all powder coated, but not all that well really. The shipping was very poor and there were scratches everywhere. He gave me some money to make up for it, and I'm gonna sand and paint the scratched areas.

    There are also problems with when they powder coated. It appears to have been done before they installed the studs in the axle. When they heated it to install, they blistered off a lot of the powder coat.

    They also powder coated before bending parts into shape, which causes problems.
     
  7. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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    I agree with not wanting to trailer on the strap, but I've never had an issue with my 15-year-old Seitech. Have they switched the plastic material over the years?
     
  8. jimmy

    jimmy New Member

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    One more vote for the kitty hawk. They tow great, protect the boat and last forever.
     
  9. 154537

    154537 Member

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    have you been using it for hand launching as it was designed or do you use to strap the boat to- onto another trailer that is used for trailering behind a vehicle?

    i believe the connecting pieces have always been plastic. i've had seitech's for years without them breaking, recently i got a brand new one and the t-joint snapped during the first season
     
  10. Pedal-Force

    Pedal-Force Member

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    I've used my Right-On a couple times now and the ease of use is quite nice.

    I haven't had any problems with the strap, it doesn't move around much, it's tight enough to hold it without damaging the deck (it doesn't even move my admittedly soft deck or hull). The loading/unloading is simple and fast. There's an extra lashing to do, but that's no big deal. Already having the boat on the dolly is very nice.

    The kitty hawk you can use as a dolly, but you have to put your trailer in the water, which wears out the hubs and such faster, and you also have to unhook and rehook to your car, which is a pain.

    Some of the powder coating isn't perfect, but considering I could buy two of these trailers before I could get a Kitty-Hawk, I think it's a good value. With a little preventive maintenance, and keeping up with scratches I think the rust can be prevented.


    edit: I should also mention that Right-On took care of me. He was quick to help when the trailer arrived in bad condition. He compensated me with some freebies and some money so that I could fix it up.

    So far I'd buy another one. I can't comment on the long term durability, since I've only had it a few weeks.
     
  11. 154537

    154537 Member

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    while i admire right-on for making the attempt, the kitty hawk has been supplying great trailers to sailors for years and years. it appears that your right-on has had problems from the get-go. i have never seen one, but i have a problem with the design. you shouldnt need to "fix-up" a brand new product. thats a hassle that most people dont want to deal with.

    btw, i saved a TON Of money by getting my kitty hawk from APS (apsltd.com). even with the extra shipping charges it was still cheaper than my local dealor.
     
  12. The Unknown Master

    The Unknown Master Member

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    When using the Righton or Kitty Hawk, do you generally put spars on your car roof, or on the deck of the boat? I am going to be buying one of these in the spring.
     
  13. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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  14. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    My (third-hand) Laser came with a spar bag. I use a strap to tie the bag to the hull. But the Spar Partner system (see previous post) looks fine to me as a (possibly cheaper) alternative.
     
  15. blooztune

    blooztune New Member

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    I'm in the market for a trailer and am interested in one of these that allow a singlehanded launch. The one concern I have, though, is trailering with the bottom down and exposed to rocks/tar/goo etc. while on the road. What are you folk's thoughts/solutions for this. I have a bottom cover. Is it feasible to put on a bottom cover with a boat on a dolly/trailer by yourself?
     
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  16. torrid

    torrid Just sailing

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    I drape the bottom cover over the supports of my Kitty Hawk before loading the boat, by either bow pivot or having someone help me lift it. I then pull the cover up over the edges of the boat. Done.
     
  17. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    It's easy for the Laser/Trailex, and I am a bit lazy as far as that is concerned. Do it all the time.
     
  18. akochen

    akochen New Member

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    Yes. I often put on my bottom cover while it is sitting on the dolly. I have no trouble. I have the flanges up so the boat is sitting on the flanges and not the strap. I put the bow of the cover on, pull the cover back along side the boat, lift one side to put the cover between the bottom and the strap, pull the cover over the transom and pull up each side. Done. Takes maybe a minute of my time.
     
  19. akochen

    akochen New Member

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    While I'm here, I want to add, this is my third season of using my Right on Trailer. While it is easy to load by myself, I am disappointed with the quality of finish of the trailer. The powder coat has chipped off in many places and started to rust. I am often treating the rust spots to keep the rust in check. The trailer is stored outdoors all the time. I am going to keep this trailer for as long it lasts. Next time I'll buy a Kittyhawk.
     
  20. Friendly Dragon

    Friendly Dragon Member

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    48,000 miles on my Kitty Hawk, (cross country 4 times) plus all the other distances. First time I was worried about the 8" tires, but even in 100 degrees the hubs never got warm enough to warrant worry, normally they were always cool to the palm. Some people install 12" wheels for this concern but I assure you there is no need. I also run 18lbs or less of psi because it gives a smooth ride and more even tread wear. I did install Bearing Buddies, not to keep out water but to insure grease was always pressured to the bearings. Note: I use the normal purple trailer bearing grease, not the blue bubble gum for sustained high speeds. Many times in excess of 85 mph. West Texas baby, gets real boring. Obviously the load is light but I do pack the cockpit with gear and carry 2 sets of spars on deck. Towing behind the minivan actually increases my mileage, not much but definatley doesn't decline it. I presume this is due to the aerodynamics low design of the rig. I never have used the trailer to launch as the ease of transferring to the dolly with the pivot is really nice. For comparison purposes, the Trailex is more expensive, and bolt together joints in its aluminum frame with sharp edges, pivot bow optional. The less expensive (maybe) Right-On trailer is designed not to have to go into the water, but if it does, and especially if it goes into salt water, remember that it's powder coated carbon steel. It will rust. The Kitty Hawk galvanized seems to be the most popular of the Laser trailers, but I have never wished I had purchased a different trailer than my SS Kitty Hawk. Once I got rear ended by a Monster Truck at a stop light in Houston. He could not see the Laser due to the hight of his truck and proceeded to push against the laser shoving it against the bow support, bending it but not breaking it. We navigated from the rush hour traffic into a Burger King parking lot where he forfieted $200 cash instead of me informing his insurance. Since the support gave way there was no gamage to the boat, this would not have been the case with either of the other two trailers. Ya ya ya, I know. Lastly, I must agree with those that hate the regular tailights. Although I don't have issue with submerging them in water, I do have issue with replacing the bulbs everytime the trailer is towed with no boat, weight on it. Others say they don't have this problem, but every time the trailer bumps down the road lite, it cost me bulbs. I've gone sof far as to remove the bulbs, so far no tickets. (Daytime only.)
     

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