Turtle

JohnCT

Active Member
#21
I have never adjusted my rig to set the clew, I adjust goose neck and halyard location. The clew ends up where it ends up. If it's getting buried in the waves, sail flatter, flat is fast.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#22
The "geometric effect" is unavoidable for today's racing setups.

For day sailing, the gooseneck can be set putting the boom about 11 inches above the deck. For sailors without a window in their sail, it's a good compromise. Adjusting for clew height above the waves in the tricky winds experienced by mixmkr should reduce his capsizes.
Btw....the capsizing isn't a problem....part of the fun and "taking chances!" At 64 I'm going to enjoy that I can still pull myself back aboard in a timely fashion.
Not to worry about getting back on board, later in life. With your fiberglassing skills, I can see a doorway installed in the side of your Sunfish. :cool:

(A doorway such as that found in advertised seniors' replacement bathtubs).
 
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mixmkr

Active Member
Thread starter #23
Mr Wind...you crack me up. Btw, big gelcoat order today. I've found mixing 2002-2006 white SeaRay and AquaFinn gelcoat in almost a 50:50 ratio is so darn close to my 69 fish, it's almost a perfect match.

btw...my capsizes happen when I'm close hauled and the wind shifts enough to put me on the opposite tack. However, the wind shifts quicker than I can scramble to the high side, and my weight and wind combined make for splash.
I have had the rare instance of my life jacket catching on the boom, even with a zillion mainsheet hangers, and that usually makes the situation a little wetter too. But like I said, I don't really care....at least at this point until I need to make that boarding ramp and the side entry doorway!
 
#24
I turtled for the first time in my Sunfish tonight during our weekly races. Not only for the first time, but the second time too. The wind was blowing around 15 knots, and for a new sailor like me it was a complete blast!

I wasn't thinking about corking the boom, buoyancy, or anything like that. The boat was very easy to turn back over using the traditional yank on the centerboard technique, and I was able to rejoin at least one of the races and managed to finish respectfully.

My perspective is to not over think the problem. Just watch the water drain out as you get back under way.....
 
#26
i have two sunfish, one hull was waterlogged and heavy and the extra weight instantly made the boat turtle. i rigged up a radon fan and dryer vent into hull and left the fan plugged in all winter and now the hull is light and the boat takes a few minutes before it turtles, i think your hull is heavy and making it turtle. also if anyone wants to try the radon fan buy one off ebay their cheep and work great, they are made for constant running so they dont burn out, hope this helps
 
#27
Well, I think a lot of my turtling last week was due to 15 mph winds and heavy water in racing conditions. My boat is 132 pounds, and I don't think that's overly heavy. I didn't have gentle picturesque rollovers. They were smack downs....
 

mixmkr

Active Member
Thread starter #28
Well, I think a lot of my turtling last week was due to 15 mph winds and heavy water in racing conditions. My boat is 132 pounds, and I don't think that's overly heavy. I didn't have gentle picturesque rollovers. They were smack downs....
Same here. Light and dry hull. 20 knt winds and waves accelerate things a bit
 
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