Turtle

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by mixmkr, Jun 30, 2017.

  1. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    So it seems most times when I capsize, the boat turtles. That isn't an issue except when in a shallower cove ...and our lake is mostly a thick mud bottom...which is good and bad. The "bad" is when I'm up and going again, I might have a huge glob of mud at the top, of course dive bombing the deck, slobbering down the sail. So...pool noodle at the top and look like a summer camper... Or just quit flipping!!
    So who else gets a mud bath?
     
  2. jleonard99

    jleonard99 Sunny Sailer

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    I've been using the pool noodle method, haven't turtled yet (knock on wood)
     
  3. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Bit strange, should stay on it's side long enough to pull it upright. Might
    need to reseal the mast caps. Should not capsize too often if you let
    the sheet slip through you hand when the boat heels over too far. Sail
    adjustment is a moment-by-moment process with weight shift. More
    like staying upright on a bicycle then set it and forget it on a keel boat.
     
  4. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    I'm sailing in really shifty coves sometimes and 90 degree shifts aren't uncommon when you sail by a cove finger. In 15 kt winds, to go close hauled to close hauled without time to shift body weight...... Well over you go. Plus a good way to cool off . Spars do have a couple of pin holes but they don't take on water all that fast.
    Basically with the hull broadside to the wind (now on its side) ....after a couple seconds will start to turtle with the wind pushing the bottom of hull helping out to turtle
     
  5. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    I think you're going to need stay on a broad reach and not
    close hauled so much. It will take a bit more time to get there
    but is still faster than the capsize process. 90 degree shifts on
    close haul are going to knock you down every time.

    Seal up all the pin holes, every little bit helps. I'd just tie on
    a milk jug, used to see it done in races when I was young. Down
    and dirty does the job.
     
  6. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    I appreciate the suggestions. Sometimes my launch point is upwind and broad reaches don't get me back home.
    I was kinda more interested if others turtle as fast or if they use the "summer camp" method for flotation? I'll see what a pool noodle does this weekend as the "jug" is enough ..........well unsightly..........:)

    Btw....the capsizing isn't a problem....part of the fun and "taking chances!" At 64 I'm going to enjoy that I can still pull myself back aboard in a timely fashion
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2017
    • Disagree Disagree x 1
  7. JohnCT

    JohnCT Active Member

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    Take your mast and put it in the water and see if water is getting in.

    I sealed the caps with 3M 4200
     
  8. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    A little is. I can see the pin holes when it drains. But it is VERY little getting in. Maybe a pint or two with the spars floating in the water for 20 minutes. My caps are sealed too. This is a 69 rig. Cork long gone as well.

    I'll tape up the pin holes too....cover all bases.
     
  9. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    I was thinking about using a Minifish sail and found as thread where you asked
    the same in 2013. I think it's a valid idea as I found Kevane Sails is selling them
    new for $149. It might put the Sunfish back into its intended performance envelope
    for your local weather conditions.

    As far as I can tell, the cork was there because the factory pinned but did not seal the caps.
     
  10. andyatos

    andyatos Active Member

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    At 1 minute, 30 seconds in this video is footage of exactly what I do when I can't recover from a big heel from a gust and know the boat is about to lay the mast and sail in the water. Type "Laser Dry Capsize" into YouTube.

    I bail early from my attempt to save the boat and use that time to stand up on the cockpit rim, throw my leg over the gunnel and straddle the boat with one foot on the daggerboard. Most of the time, because I've gotten to the gunnel quickly (from bailing early on any further attempts to prevent the capsize), I rarely have to stand with both feet on the daggerboard. Usually, I just lean my upper body out towards the daggerboard while straddling the gunnel and the boat will start to right itself.

    The gustiest winds, with good velocity to boot, that I've sailed in are on the Russian River, downwind and in the rotor from the Willow Creek ridge. Big helicopter blasts of air with rapid 180 degree shifts. Yet using the above technique, I never end up in the water and never turtle.

    Cheers,

    - Andy
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2017
  11. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Mud stains at the top of the sail are considered a badge of honor!
     
  12. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Capsizes in general can be avoided by rigging the sail so the clew is high enough so it doesn't catch in a swell--especially when it's combined with the natural roll of the Sunfish. Once the clew gets "secured" by the water's surface, over you go! :confused:

    Unsightly milk bottle?

    Remove the wrapping from an empty transparent 2-liter bottle. A Canadian firm may still make a screw-on cap (with an eye) for attaching the bottle to the top of the spar. (I'd made mention of it--with a pic--here a few years ago).

    Early Sunfish--and some Clonefish--masts had a block at the mast-head, and ran a thin bolt through two holes in the mast.
     
  13. oldpaint

    oldpaint Active Member

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    The advice on this forum to use racketballs as a replacement for missing or damaged mast corks worked out well for me.
     
  14. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    There's no need to replace the cork, if it ever was there, with anything. Air works just fine for buoyancy.
     
  15. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    A higher rig will push you over more readily in a gust...
     
  16. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    The clew can be raised in one inch increments at the gooseneck. There's a minimal increase "penalty" in rig height.

    Where I sail, powerboaters leave huge wakes. On ideal sailing days of 10-knot wind and waves, they can combine with swells to dip the clew into the water. Raising the clew by 1 inch still gives some harrowing near-misses. :confused:
     
  17. oldpaint

    oldpaint Active Member

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    There was only one cork at each end of the mast. They were about 1.5 inches long and they made the interior air tight since the end caps were not water tight. A racketball in each end of the mast does the same job.
     
  18. Charles Howard

    Charles Howard Member

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    LVW are you day sailing or racing? When racing and with the sail low and gooseneck at 16 winds 15 to 25 have never had the clew hit the water pointing, reaching or running in waves and motorboat waves. My boat is setup for racing, hiking strap etc and do sail in flat. Pictures from the NA with winds in the 20's 2017 Sunfish North American Championship - sycphotos
     
  19. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    This is day sailing: racers set the clew very high, probably to catch winds--rather than waves. ;)
     
  20. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    Racers do not set the clew high. It's just a geometric effect of the proper gooseneck position and low rig.
     

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