Sailing a Capri in the Red Sea - Egypt!!

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by Bond, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. Bond

    Bond Member

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  2. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    It's an absolutely classic boat, but as it says on the tin, it's a 1930's British design. If you look at the spec:

    Length: 5.0 m (16.4 ft)

    Weight: 470 kg (1,036 pounds)

    Sail Area (Main sail + Jib): 16 sq.m (172 sq. ft)

    and compare it to the Expo


    Length: 13' 3" (waterline) to 15' 2" (overall)

    Weight: 154Kg / 340 punds

    Sail area: 9.66 sq. m / 104 sq ft.


    There's nothing about the draught for the Nile, but the Expo (as the original 14.2) draws just inches of water with the board up and I'd imagine pretty much every wooden boat would have to sit lower in the water because of the extra weight.

    There will be a world of difference in performance, plus in your circumstances, hauling a 340 pound across a beach will be WAY easier than moving a 1,000+ pound boat. From the pictures I'd guess the Expo cockpit is at least as big, possibly bigger than the Nile class. Certainly for launching I guess a modern glass fibre design is going to be much more practical, not to mention the maintenance issues Capri Joe touched on earlier.

    I'm biased about the Expo but for me it's not the fastest boat in the world, but it's relatively stable and in my conditions (1 mile freshwater lakes) it's by far the easiest, and that counts for a lot.

    I don't know for sure but I imagine the Expo hasn't been the most successful commercial day sailor / dinghy - mine is #137 so I assume 250 or so have been built. The market in second hand Expos is pretty small - it took me months to find one that was in driving distance. At one point I was calculating the cost of a Uhaul to bring one of the few on sale from 1,200-1,500 miles away but that was going to add almost 50% to the cost of the boat. In your circumstances finding a used Expo at a reasonable price and getting it shipped to Egypt sounds incredibly hard, and I doubt there's going to be a huge percentage saving over finding a discount on a new one.
     
  3. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Dear Bernarrd, thanks a lot for taking the time to reply in details to my post, I really appreciate that.

    I'm certainly not considering to buy the nile boat. Up till now I'm contemplating the C14.2 Mod 3 or Expo but obviously there is the hardship of buying it remotely and shipping to Egypt. The other option I'm contemplating is to buy a boat kit and build in Egypt that maybe an easier option, a fun activity and a more beautiful boat. I'm looking at the Swallow Boats the Trouper 12 and the Storm 15, which are both less heavy then the C14 but obviously needs a lot of maintenance.

    This is why I'm back to the C14.2. I didn't get the last part of your post "find a discount on a new one"?! Where can I find that? Who offers discounted new ones? Can you direct me in this matter?

    What about Catalina company, do they sell used C14s? Do they ship internationally? Any info on that matter?

    Appreciate anyones response.

    Thanks
     
  4. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    I'd caution you to check the weight and what's included very carefully. From what I understand of the construction it's hard to construct a wooden boat that's lighter than the composite equivalent.


    My understanding is Catalina sell the 14.2's & Expo's via dealers, and I've never seen them sell used models directly.

    If you look at my nearest dealer:

    http://yoursailboatshop.crehosting....boats-Catalina-14.2-EXPO/c11_14_23/index.html

    notice they're offering 'take advantage of our "Fall Dealer Truckload Purchase"' - sailboats don't seem to be as competitive as cars, but there are deals to be done with dealers, particularly if they've had the inventory a while. I assume you can get a list of dealers, including those outside the US, by contacting Catalina customer service - my experience has been good. Armed with a list I'd start contacting dealers to see what they offer, and whether they can offer shipping.

    FYI : there are other fibreglass boats in a similar size range that might have local support in your region.
     
  5. Capri Joe

    Capri Joe Member

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    Capri dealer

    Go to www.catalinayachts.com and click the 'find a dealer' tab to locate international dealers. I'm sure you can find one.
     
  6. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Any boat in particular you have in mind?

    Thank you all for the advise I contacted Catalina and they put me in contact with one of their dealers in Florida Tiki Water Sports that do international shipping. I'm just not sure yet if they have used boats. Probably not.
     
  7. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    I didn't get a chance to look at them closely, nor find anyone who had sailed them, but when I was struggling to locate a used Expo I started thinking about boats like the Hunter 15 (previous model was the 146 I think) and the Precision 15. These are like the 14.2 not the Expo. I'm sure there are others.
     
  8. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Tiki has the Hunter 140 2008 Demo new for 5000 USD with trailer.

    I don't like its looks. Any feedback?
     
  9. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    I'd been considering the 146:

    http://huntermarine.com/Models2011/HunterPreviousModels/H146Brochure2003.pdf

    not the 140. The 146 and the newer 15

    http://huntermarine.com/Models2011/15/15Index2011.html

    seem a bit puffed up to my eyes, but they would have done what I wanted if I hadn't found the Expo.

    As I said earlier I've never found anyone who has either so I don't recommend them. The Precision 15 ( there's one on this site http://www.yankeeboat.com/boat-sales/used-sailboats ) look closer to the 14.2, though they seem a tad more expensive.
     
  10. Capri Joe

    Capri Joe Member

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    I would pass on the 140 and go for the 146. I personally don't like Hunter boats but from what you stated for your goals I think the 146 would be a good sub for the 14.2. You won't get the level of excitement you would get from the 14.2 but you will get the room, safety, handling and basic sailing experience you are looking for.
     
  11. Bond

    Bond Member

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    It seems like Expo is the recommendation but tough to find. Not impossible though.

    The more I research it the more I feel confused.

    I like about the Expo that I can sail it solo (155 lb) and very easy to launch and beach and will feel probably more comfortable in it with my kids since it's difficult to capsize. I'm just afraid that I get bored of it because it's not as exciting as the standard model. I also like the cooler box.

    I like the looks of the standard model very much. I will probably find a used one easier and cheaper. I'm just afraid that it will be a difficult boat to manage on my own or with my 10 yr daughter. And end up not using it because I capsize all the time and my kids get scared of it.

    Confused confused confused. :confused::confused::confused:
     
  12. Capri Joe

    Capri Joe Member

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    Go with the Sloop Rig 14.2. You can sail it with the jib furled and the main open until you get more comfortable with it. I sail mine single handed all the time and when the winds get above my comfort zone I furl the jib and keep going. You will learn more and enjoy sailing more with the sloop rig regardless of the make of boat.
     
  13. bernardd

    bernardd Member

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    That's part of why I was suggesting you get some time in a similar boat before trying to buy one. That will give you a good idea of what you can manage on your own, as well as the chance of ending up in the water.
     
  14. kdub

    kdub Member

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    I would encourage you to not fear the capsize too much, embrace it. I remember when I was a kid learning to sail we would take out the butterflies and sail in heavy wind and capsizing was the highlight of the experience. When you are young and fearless (assuming you daughter is a confident swimmer) going in to the drink is a blast. You may find that the excitement of getting a little wet will make your daughter want to sail, maybe she will find it more fun than you do. Like I said when I was a kid climbing in and around the boat was why we fell in love with sailing and I still enjoy the excitement of dumping once and a while. The capsize that is not fun is the one that is caused by an equipment malfunction and you are not expecting it, and it usually happens fast. Working on your boat and time with your gear is the only way to avoid these misfortunes, but somethings bound to go wrong eventually, you just have to get back on the horse and learn from experience. One last note on capsizing. It is not fun is when you have stuff around the boat that you can loose when you tip, so if you are prepared, with gear stowed, and crew familiar with your righting procedure you can enjoy it.
     
  15. dewaegep

    dewaegep New Member

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    As kdub said previously, capsizing is a reality.
    I always secure all my bags, coolers etc I carry on.
    Where I sail, I have only 3 meters depth, so if I'm not quick enough in recovering the boat, the mast will stuck in the mud. Not funny, as i need then to rotate the boat so the current help me in quit the mast from the mud.
    Also, practice first in small wind, small waves, and when you're confident, do it in more wind and waves. Never forget to unlock your sails before redressing your boat, you will find that the boat can go alone and leave you in the water watching a beautiful boat sailing away alone.
    Not a good thing if your far away. Never panic, stay always calm.
    Think twice how you will redress your boat.
    If you have a Novice friend with you, explain him what you will do, and what you expect from him. Be sure he understand. Ask him if he is OK, and if you see he (or you) came out of forces, take a rest (if hypothermia is not an issue). If needed, you can step on the hull out of the water to take a rest and think.
    I´m maybe dramatic, but believe me, I had to do it once when I capsize with a novice.
    But, always have your life jacket on, and if sailing in cold weather, proper clothes is mandatory.
    Patrick
     
  16. Bond

    Bond Member

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    Hi All, I'm currently searching for an Expo to buy and ship to Egypt where I sail (will start sailing) on the red sea. The Expo is proving more difficult to find and will cost more to ship since it has a slightly longer mast that will not fit in a 20' container and hence will need a 40' cont.

    The standard C14.2 will probably be easy to find and cheaper to ship. my intentions with sailing is not racing but rather to go cruising with kids. Reef the main sail, anchor and just play around. So the Expo seemed perfect. I'm willing to reconsider the standard rig if someone assures me that I can still do the same with it. I also suspect that I will sail solo a lot.

    The boat will be always stored on the beach trolley, so the mast will always stay stepped in and accordingly rigging should be easy for both models, correct?

    Please Capri experts, advise me..
     
  17. kdub

    kdub Member

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    Here are my last two cents. The boat you have is much better than the boat you don't. If you want to sail get out there and do it. You will learn to love and manage which ever you pick.
     

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