rigging the jib on a Mod II

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by Jim Wellman, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Jim Wellman

    Jim Wellman New Member

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    I just bought hull 3483, a 1990 Mod II. The jib halyard doesn't seem to be set up correctly. The halyard has a small block positioned just about in the middle of the halyard. I think that I see how this is supposed to be rigged - I guess the idea is to allow simple adjustment to the jib luff tension. However, the portion of the halyard that attaches to the jib doesn't seem long enough - when the block is all the way up to the jib halyard block the head of the jib is still several feet off the deck. Also, while sailing won't this block tend to bang against the mast?

    What are the proper dimensions for the two parts of the halyard that attach to the block? For that matter, what diameter line should I use for the halyard (what I have looks like 5/16").

    And, at the tack of the jib how does it attach to the stem? Does it use a short line? If I hook the tack to the stem then I can't raist the jib all the way and the foot of the sail touches the deck - I know this can't be right.

    What diameter line is good for sheets?

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Jack McCollum

    Jack McCollum New Member

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    Jim,

    First of all, pull your jib halyard including the block down until the jib just touches the deck and maybe a bit more. Tie off the line to the cleat. With the leftover length of rope you go up around the block and down to the jam cleat. This way you can adjust your jib tension by pulling down on the line when you're going upwind. For downwind you just uncleat it from the jam cleat.
     
  3. Jim Wellman

    Jim Wellman New Member

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    Thanks!

    Jack, thanks for the help. This makes sense, and I read one of the tuning guides and your advice corresponds well with what they said.
     

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