Mainsheet and Halyard lines

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by scubabuffett, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. scubabuffett

    scubabuffett New Member

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    Does anyone know the length and diameter of rope needed to replace the lines for the Halyard? Also does anyone know the length of line and type I should get to replace the Mainsheet? I've seen on several websites that they recommend 25' for the mainsheet. I just can't figure out why one would need so much. Any suggestions. I'm restoring my boat and would like to put some new lines on it.

    Thanks
     
  2. sfox

    sfox New Member

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    Actually you should have 27' to 28' feet for your mainsheet 5/16 or 3/8 dia. which ever you prefer. As for the type either a single braid or what I use is rooster ropes 3/8 dia. The halyard shoud be at least 24' or more of 3/8 dia. non-stretch yale cordage or similar. You can look on apsltd.com under one design then Sunfish and it gives you the types you would need.
     
  3. supercub

    supercub Member

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    Vanguard, under SF specifications, list the size of line needed. As SFox stated APS also has/had a line size chart with the halyard at 25', but either 3/16 or 1/4" low or no stretch line. The main sheet is 25' of 3/8" (9mm) line, many racers prefer 5/16" (7mm) at 32-33'.
     
  4. Porpoise2

    Porpoise2 New Member

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    1) Why the eight extra feet of 7mm?

    2) Are there desirable occasions when one should extend the clew beyond the mast? (I have done it, but it was "an extreme event".)

    3) Why not a tapered line—starting thin at the traveler? (I've seen it, but can't recall the instance that it was used).
     
  5. supercub

    supercub Member

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    As for why the line is so long, it starts at the bridle, up to the rear boom block, forward to the front block and down to the deck block (or dratted hook) and the to your hand. You also have to allow enough line for the sail to be at least at right angles to the centerline (as on a run) and have some left to hold onto. Also for sailing "by the lee", a tricky bit of light wind sailing.

    Why not tapered, see rule 3.7.
     
  6. sfox

    sfox New Member

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    Oops I made a typo in the halyard as supercub said its 3/16 or 1/4" for the halyard. As for the extra length I wouldn't want mine 32' I have mine a 28' and it gives me more than enough sheet to extend beyond 90 degrees downwind if needed and to tie the sheet to the hiking strap to prevent knotting itself.
     
  7. blueberry

    blueberry member

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    I have 30 feet of line and it is enough.
     
  8. scubabuffett

    scubabuffett New Member

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    Thanks so much for the information. After thinking about the lengths do make sense. Thanks again for the great info.
     
  9. Porpoise2

    Porpoise2 New Member

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    Is that a racing rule?

    I'm looking to keep the "heavy" part of the mainsheet out of the water in light air (and even "heavy" waves), but keep a "fat" part to grasp -- for pleasure sailing only.

    Is sailing "by the lee" a desireable skill :confused: ?. I'm usually overwhelmed by strong winds when that happens, and never thought to use it in light air, except when it gets "shifty", and gibeings (jibeings?) become a pain.
     
  10. mike4947

    mike4947 Member

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    rather than trying to lighten up the main sheet by tapering it's easier and more effective, not to mention quite a bit cheaper, to use a Jesus strap (either line or bungey) to the front of the boom to hold the boom out when running. Keeps the main sheet taut which does two things. Keep the sheet out of the water for less drag and IMHO more important keeps it taut as well so any wind goes to moving the boat and not first moving the boom and straightening out the mainsheet.
     

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