Jib Reefing

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by kdub, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. kdub

    kdub Member

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    I was wondering if it would be safe/possible to wrap the jib before launch to create a reefed setup to sail heavy wind. I have no furler and share in the desire to solo handle comfortably on a windy day. I have tried to work with main only, reefed and not, but it seems like the best way to get the boat to point and handle well is to reef both main and jib. Has anyone ever tried to wrap it?
     
  2. Allatoona

    Allatoona Member

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    I have reefed my main 3 times in heavy air, sailing solo each time. I think the jib is small enough so you shouldn't need to reef the jib, not sure how you could reef it unless you have a furled jib.

    Check out my picture on tightening up the jib halyard:
    http://www.capri14.org/forum/jib-halyard-question-t2726.html#6

    Use a block inline in the halyard to create a pulley system to really crank it down. This will tighten up the leading edge of the jib, and the forestay will go slack. This will help getting the boat to point a little higher. When the wind is blowing very hard, I have had trouble pointing upwind while sailing solo.

    You can also try tuning the rigging and see what you can get out of it. Tighten/loosen the wires port/starboard to rake the mast fore/aft. See what works for you.

    -Robert
    1989 Capri 14.2
    1984 Catalina 22
     
  3. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    In a way, I've reefed my jib! Here's how: I purchased and installed a used North sail made for a Snipe. It's dimensions are: Luff 12.3', Leech 11.6', Foot 6.4', LP 6'. It has a wire luff with a fork on the bottom and velcro loops for hanking. It also has a jib cunningham which is really cool to use -- I have a 1/4" control line that goes through the cunningham, through the tack shakle, and leads back to be cleated on my jib halyard cleat.

    I can put the foot right on the foredeck! BTW, I use a shorter jib sheet -- 32' (Paraloc Piranha, 1/4") instead of the 38' Catalina recommends. For sailing solo, this really makes a difference in my ability to sheet the jib on turns both ways, and it keeps 6' of line out of the cockpit.

    Not bad for a $60 investment!

    FYI: Factory Catalina Jib dimensions are Luff 13'4", Leech 12'7", Foot 7'11", Chord 6'6".

    -- Edward
     
  4. kdub

    kdub Member

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    That sheet sounds very cool and for only $60, great deal! Maybe I should keep my eye on a used sail of similar dimensions. Here is a quick question about wire luff. In a jib sail that is equipped for furling are there two wires in the luff? (my sail has one wire with loops on the end just like the stay cables) The deck of my boat has wear marks that are circular so it looks to me like it had a roller furling set up at some point; so I was thinking that maybe my sail could be rolled if I purchased equipment, or as I mentioned considering just wrapping it around the forstay then bunching it up or letting it slack completely when not in use (in a windy situation).
     
  5. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    The jib designed for furling on our boat has a single wire with two loops just like the nonfurling jib. The difference is that luff tape is applied (to the luff!) to give stiffness needed to make the furling drum able to begin wrapping the sail. I suspect the nonfurling jib will furl also, but not as easily. I have friends who use jibs without luff tape on their furlers in other dinghys.

    I simply loosely wrap my jib around at the dock after a day of sailing; to go out for a day, I unwrap (furl) it, again by hand, after hoisting the mainsail, attach the jib sheet, set all control lines, and sail away from my slip. BTW, I'm soloing it now, so it isn't all that hard to sail from a dock or slip with both sails -- just sheet carefully.

    Those marks could be from the jib sheet shackle whacking the deck -- I'm not sure how a furler would produce marks. Early on, I removed the carabiner that my boat's previous owner used to attach the jib sheets -- it looked like a potent weapon! I now use a soft shackle described here.

    -- Edward
     
  6. kdub

    kdub Member

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    Thanks for the input. Is luff tape the same as sail repair tape? I saw a fifteen foot roll of dacron sail repair tape at west marine the other day for 13 bucks. On the package it said it can be used to reduce chafing on shrouds, is this the stuff that I could apply to my luff to protect it while furled? Again, thanks for the help.
     
  7. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    No, sail repair tape isn't luff tape. Luff tape is usually dacron, folder over one or two small braided cords. You can check with companies like Sailrite: look for luff tape conversion kits.

    The tape's purpose isn't really (just) for protection; rather, it stiffens the luff so that the furler can wind the sail, much like a roller shade. On bigger boats, the luff tape actually slides into a channel in the furler's foil. The Capri's furler doesn't have a foil, I guess because the jib is relatively small.

    -- Edward
     

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