Go Alinghi!

Discussion in 'The Dockhouse' started by Merrily, Jun 23, 2007.

  1. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Re: ET New Zealand files a protest after Race 4

    Jerry is referring to when Alinghi lost in Race 3 by not covering and counted on their superior boat speed. That's what he thinks was arrogant. And those tactics lost the race for Alinghi.
     
  2. JRchipper

    JRchipper New Member

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    I live text account of the AC is provided by Mark Chisnell at http://www.tackbytack.com/

    It's very good and doesn't interrupt your work day too much for those of us in NA.

    Enjoy.
     
  3. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Brmmm Brmmm

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    What a shocker! The only good thing to come out of the race was the wind it must have put up Alinghi for them to see how fast the ETNZ boat is in more wind. Even with a totally stuffed up sail change, twice, they were reducing the distance downwind. They may be ideal conditions for the ETNZ boat. If those conditions continue, without gear failure,there may still be a race for the cup.
     
  4. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Race 5

    New Zealand entered the starting box from the right, probably the only bright spot they had in mind before the race. Winds were strong, about 15 knots, and the word on the street is that Alinghi would like this wind and New Zealand was more a low-wind type of boat.

    New Zealand took advantage of its starting position and managed to dominate the starting sequence. It pushed Alinghi over the line well before the start, and Alinghi went downwind through the spectator fleet to try to get away, but New Zealand stayed right after them. New Zealand started with a 5 second lead, to windward to Alinghi as both boats headed to the right. One often hears that the boat that's faster upwind will win and one can often see that after five minutes, so the first five minutes were watched with great anticipation. New Zealand had changed their bulb at the bottom of the keel to improve their speed in high winds, but it seemed unlikely that would make enough of a difference. The first few minutes confirmed expectations. Alinghi slowly caught up with New Zealand, then steadily moved ahead. High winds are predicted for the race again tomorrow, so if Alinghi would keep going faster in high winds, the Cup seems assured of staying in Switzerland.

    Then Alinghi's lead stopped growing. Then New Zealand gained it back, and retook the lead. I think everyone had to be surprised. Both boats stayed on port tack to the layline, with Alinghi close enough to New Zealand it might have had a hard time coming about. New Zealand forced Alinghi well over the layline, then tacked for the first mark. When Alinghi did likewise, Alinghi was trailing behind New Zealand by 2 or 3 boat lengths. It was remarkable. New Zealand rounded the first mark 12 second ahead, and as Slinghi rounded it put its bow down. That somehow seemed to be a bit threatening. Throughout the races, the commentators have said that New Zealand did a better job managing the sails, getting them up and down faster than Alinghi, etc., except of course for the one catastrophic spinnaker drop in race 3. On the downwind leg, it looked like New Zealand's spinnaker got a small rip as it went up, or else the rip was already there, and after a few minutes New Zealand brought another spinnaker up on deck, ready to replace the torn one, with a lead of 50 or 60 meters. Suddenly, the spinnaker blew out and was flying everywhere in the strong wind. Alinghi moved to pass New Zealand as they tried frantically to get the new spinnaker fastened. Apparently what happened next is that the anxious rear guard on New Zealand, seeing Alinghi beginning to pass, yelled "Hoist," which tells the grinders to go all out to lift the sail, but the men at the front didn't have the sail attached yet. The new spinnaker thus didn't set, and was soon a second disaster. It's rare for New Zealand to make such a mistake, but they did it this time. Alinghi moved well in front while the crew tried to cut off the old spinnaker and get a third one up and filling. It got twisted into an hourglass shape, but after a while they finally got it pulling. They were then on the layline and immediately gybed, but their 50 m lead was now a 150 m deficit. New Zealand quickly recovered its composure, but they were well behind.

    Alinghi kept a loose cover for the rest of the leg and rounded the downwind mark 26 seconds ahead. Alinghi didn't cover New Zealand for awhile on the upwind leg and New Zealand gained until it was less than a boat length behind, but then Alinghi got a wind shift and pulled well into the lead again. New Zealand gained 2 seconds in the upwind leg, to round the top mark 24 seconds behind. In the heavy wind, apparently an asymmetrical spinnaker provides more power, but it stops pulling for a bit with each gybe. Alinghi used an asymmetrical kite, while New Zealand went with a symmetrical model. Speculation was they were out of fresh asymmetrical spinnakers. New Zealand gained intermittently on the downwind leg, pulling to within 55 meters at one point, but they couldn't pull around Alinghi and lost by 19 seconds.

    Alinghi now leads 3-2 and has to feel pretty good at regaining the lead in points. New Zealand will have to win 3 out of 4 races to take the Cup. On the other hand, if I were on Alinghi, I think I would feel less comfortable now that I did when it was tied 2-2. In high winds, as predicted tomorrow, New Zealand looks slightly faster. Alinghi can't count on catastrophes to New Zealand to save it. The race looks more exciting than I thought it would be a this point.
     
  5. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    Yes, I say, Eddie has to lighten a candle at the church to win again..., I'm afraid. As spectator, I hope, we will see more than 3 races during the next days at Valencia, but I'm not sure in that.
    NZL lost race 5, but, They have been the winner of the day I think, because they have let seen the spectators how to sail a boat and not lose control of her, althopugh 2 spi's got lost, whow... real experts on the water...
    Chapeau!
    LooserLu


    P.S.:
    For the Europeans: Today, Saturday 30th, the German Free-Digital-TV-Channel "ARD-Eins-Festival" (Astra 1B Satellite - Satellite-DVB-S, [19,2°East,Freq 12110, Horizontal, 27500]) does transmit the full 6th race, beginning at 14:45 pm to ~17:35 pm Berlin Summer Time (Greenwich Time plus 2 hours). No Commertials, but German-commentary. Have fun
     
  6. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Race 6

    The winds were weaker than expected, around 10 knots, so if New Zealand is faster in high winds, that advantage won't help much today. Also, there was less chop on the water, and in previous races the chop seemed to bother Alinghi more than New Zealand, so there's another advantage for Alinghi. Alinghi entered on the favored starboard side. A win for Alionghi would make it 4-2, and New Zealand would have to win the last 3 in a row to take the Cup.

    Alinghi really wanted to start to starboard of New Zealand and after considerable maneuvering (New Zealand gybed close to Alinghi, who appealed for a foul but the appeal was denied), the boats started at the same time, Alinghi to windward, at full speed, on starboard tack. They stayed on nearly parallel courses, although New Zealand matched Alinghi's speed and slowly sailed higher and got closer to Alinghi. Alinghi would like to force New Zealand over the layline, but before they got to the lay line New Zealand got close enough to Alinghi to force it to tack. This was quite a change to the starts earlier in the series when New Zealand could not force Alinghi away. Both boats headed to the right side, with Alinghi staying about 5 meters ahead, moving at the same speed. A slight wind shift to the left put New Zealand ahead by 20 meters as they approached the right layline. Alinghi came about and it looked like New Zealand had moved far enough ahead to cross upwind of Alinghi, but instead New Zealand tacked back to the left. As both boats head for the mark, Alight got a lift and gained, and it was nip and tuck whether New Zealand had enough lead to cross ahead of Alinghi. Alinghi had starboard advantage, but New Zealand just managed to get ahead and round the mark 14 seconds ahead. Impressive. A week ago Alinghi looked like generally a slightly faster boat, but they look pretty even now.

    On the downwind leg, New Zealand kept a tight cover half way down, but then New Zealand went to the right and Alinghi to the left. Wind droped to 8 knots, and as the boats came back together New Zealand had slightly increased their lead, to about 100 meters. So leaving Alinghi uncovered paid off. But as both boats went along close together toward the bottom mark, Alinghi went slightly faster and narrowed New Zealand's lead. New Zealand rounded 11 seconds ahead, going around the left-hand mark and Alinghi around the right. By rounding different marks, Alinghi could be farther away from New Zealand going upwind, with the hope of getting a right-hand wind shift and providing an opportunity to pass. Both boats stayed on starboard tack to close to the layline, with Alinghi gaining as the wind shifted to the right. When Alinghi tacked onto starboard and headed toward New Zealand, New Zealand did not have enough of a lead to cross upwind of Alinghi, and it had to tack away. Alinghi started a tacking dual and pulled into a nice boat length lead! Suddenly Alinghi was in command. Alinghi held on to the lead around the top mark, crossing 16 seconds ahead. Since Alinghi seemed a bit faster on the previous downwind leg, it looked good for the Swiss.

    For awhile Alinghi kept a tight cover and New Zealand started a gybing dual. New Zealand seemed to gain on each gybe, but Alinghi would pull ahead between gybes. Finally Alinghi stopped covering and let New Zealand go off to the right, giving them the hope for a favorable wind shift. The wind did shift a bit, but it favored Alinghi, and New Zealand had to gybe back toward Alinghi. The lead bounced back and forth but staying close to 100 meters. Another split developed between the boats and when the boats come back together suddenly New Zealand had gained back most of the lead, pulling to less than a boat length behind, but the end of the course was getting close! New Zealand's bow was close to Alinghi's stern. New Zealand went for another split hoping for a wind shift, but Alinghi got the better wind and quickly pulls well ahead again, crossing the line 28 seconds ahead.

    This has to be very discouraging for New Zealand. Yesterday's loss was a result of a sail blowing out, but here they just lost. It's 4-2 for Alinghi. New Zealand would have to win the last 3 in a row to take the Cup. Still, the races are close and exciting, the best America's Cup race in many a decade.
     
  7. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Race 6

    The winds were weaker than expected, around 10 knots, so if New Zealand is faster in high winds, that advantage won't help much today. Also, there was less chop on the water, and in previous races the chop seemed to bother Alinghi more than New Zealand, so there's another advantage for Alinghi. Alinghi entered on the favored starboard side. A win for Alionghi would make it 4-2, and New Zealand would have to win the last 3 in a row to take the Cup.

    Alinghi really wanted to start to starboard of New Zealand and after considerable maneuvering (New Zealand gybed close to Alinghi, who appealed for a foul but the appeal was denied), the boats started at the same time, Alinghi to windward, at full speed, on starboard tack. They stayed on nearly parallel courses, although New Zealand matched Alinghi's speed and slowly sailed higher and got closer to Alinghi. Alinghi would like to force New Zealand over the layline, but before they got to the lay line New Zealand got close enough to Alinghi to force it to tack. This was quite a change to the starts earlier in the series when New Zealand could not force Alinghi away. Both boats headed to the right side, with Alinghi staying about 5 meters ahead, moving at the same speed. A slight wind shift to the left put New Zealand ahead by 20 meters as they approached the right layline. Alinghi came about and it looked like New Zealand had moved far enough ahead to cross upwind of Alinghi, but instead New Zealand tacked back to the left. As both boats head for the mark, Alight got a lift and gained, and it was nip and tuck whether New Zealand had enough lead to cross ahead of Alinghi. Alinghi had starboard advantage, but New Zealand just managed to get ahead and round the mark 14 seconds ahead. Impressive. A week ago Alinghi looked like generally a slightly faster boat, but they look pretty even now.

    On the downwind leg, New Zealand kept a tight cover half way down, but then New Zealand went to the right and Alinghi to the left. Wind droped to 8 knots, and as the boats came back together New Zealand had slightly increased their lead, to about 100 meters. So leaving Alinghi uncovered paid off. But as both boats went along close together toward the bottom mark, Alinghi went slightly faster and narrowed New Zealand's lead. New Zealand rounded 11 seconds ahead, going around the left-hand mark and Alinghi around the right. By rounding different marks, Alinghi could be farther away from New Zealand going upwind, with the hope of getting a right-hand wind shift and providing an opportunity to pass. Both boats stayed on starboard tack to close to the layline, with Alinghi gaining as the wind shifted to the right. When Alinghi tacked onto starboard and headed toward New Zealand, New Zealand did not have enough of a lead to cross upwind of Alinghi, and it had to tack away. Alinghi started a tacking dual and pulled into a nice boat length lead! Suddenly Alinghi was in command. Alinghi held on to the lead around the top mark, crossing 16 seconds ahead. Since Alinghi seemed a bit faster on the previous downwind leg, it looked good for the Swiss.

    For awhile Alinghi kept a tight cover and New Zealand started a gybing dual. New Zealand seemed to gain on each gybe, but Alinghi would pull ahead between gybes. Finally Alinghi stopped covering and let New Zealand go off to the right, giving them the hope for a favorable wind shift. The wind did shift a bit, but it favored Alinghi, and New Zealand had to gybe back toward Alinghi. The lead bounced back and forth but staying close to 100 meters. Another split developed between the boats and when the boats come back together suddenly New Zealand had gained back most of the lead, pulling to less than a boat length behind, but the end of the course was getting close! New Zealand's bow was close to Alinghi's stern. New Zealand went for another split hoping for a wind shift, but Alinghi got the better wind and quickly pulls well ahead again, crossing the line 28 seconds ahead.

    This has to be very discouraging for New Zealand. Yesterday's loss was a result of a sail blowing out, but here they just lost. It's 4-2 for Alinghi. New Zealand would have to win the last 3 in a row to take the Cup. Still, the races are close and exciting, the best America's Cup race in many a decade.
     
  8. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Brmmm Brmmm

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    Dear oh dear.

    Will ETNZ manage to take 2 races in a row to even be in the game?

    no gear failure, no handling errors, no penalties, no tactical errors (always making the best decision) and retain enough boat speed when necessary?

    any two of those things they've done before. To do them all, for at least two races...it's a real big ask.

    Theoretically they could do it, they are good enough, but will it happen?

    This series has broken plenty of the old rules of engagement. But to make a comeback from their positon now? That would totally reconstruct the way teams view the tendancies of the Americas Cup Racing.

    I'd love to see it happen, but how often do miracles happen? Are we due for one yet? :D lol.
     
  9. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    It's like LooserLu said, only it's ETNZ that needs to light a bunch of candles now.
     
  10. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Brmmm Brmmm

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    Australia 2 won from a 3-1 position. So it's been done before. Dunno whether that makes it more possible or less possible. lol.
     
  11. LooserLu

    LooserLu LooserLu

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    ha ha...Yup!, Merrily, it seems to go this way.

    But, Race 6, I think, let us have seen how important it is, to be a good strategist. AND: To have the luck exact at the right time, to get from god of the winds "Rasmus" himself ;) , the right breeze / or better to say: the wind shift from the correct side to have the advantage to lead at that moment it is mostful a need. That's what sailing is about (don't we have all made such experiences on the water ourself often enough, during the races we joined ?!) and all those, that aren't infected by the virus we all together uncurable here have, never do understand us ... let those (uninfected) people go to Indie-Car - or F1- racing or Tour de France '07 ...

    Good success ENZL, let's play the game today, Dean! The rest of the crazy sailing world wants to see some more of such exciting races next week, okay, won't we? :D


    @49208
    At the TV of GER yesterday they told, Eddie uses sunglasses where informations of f.e. boatspeed, actual wind direction at the boat etc. are shown inside of the glasses for him. So, the bag, Eddie wears at the back, only carries the electronical stuff that is need to receive this informations for the sunglasses. We both know, not even a small electronical compass at the bracelet-watch is permitted at major races for the Laser ...
    May we are correct to say: Eddie made the correct decision to change early enough from our, so called "one-design", sailing class to such another sort of "experimental"-"one design" sailing class where those "gizmos" are permitted... ;) ;)


    Cheers
    and:
    Have fun (also: best greetings to Cascais/Portugal to all of the athlets at ISAF Worlds 2007! www.cascaisworlds2007.com)
    LooserLu

    P.S.:

    For the Europeans: Today, Sunday July 1st, the German Free-Digital-TV-Channel "ZDF-INFO" (Astra 1B Satellite - Satellite-DVB-S, [19,2°East,Freq 11954, Horizontal, 27500]) does transmitt the full 7th race beginning at 14:45 pm to ~17:30 pm Berlin Summer Time (Greenwich Time plus 2 hours). No Commertials but German-commentary.

    And:
    If there (!!hopefully!!) are more races: Netxt race, race 8, would be broadcast at July 3rd, at the German Free-Digital-TV-Channel "ARD-Eins-Festival" (Astra 1B Satellite - Satellite-DVB-S, [19,2°East,Freq 12110, Horizontal, 27500]) beginning at 14:45 pm to ~17:35 pm Berlin Summer Time (Greenwich Time plus 2 hours). No Commertials, but German-commentary.
     
  12. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    Jerry says:

    An analyst claimed that, had New Zealand been 10 meters farther ahead on leg 3 yesterday, it would have stayed ahead of Alinghi. Had that happened and had it not blown out its spinnaker on race 4, New Zealand would now lead the series 4-2. On the other hand, had the bizarre wind shifts on race 3 been slightly different, the score would now stand 5-1 for Alinghi, they would have retained the Cup, and it would look like they nearly swept New Zealand. I guess the breaks sort of even out.

    Winds were light and highly variable today, and after waiting awhile they called off races for the day. Tomorrow is a lay day. Try again on Tuesday.
     
  13. Chainsaw

    Chainsaw Brmmm Brmmm

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    Re: Jerry's account of the America's Cup

    Makes you wonder the use of predicting the future by projecting a single event into the future without considering everything else influencing that single event. Happens all the time, even by 'respected scientists'.

    Where does an analyst stop collecting data to make a prediction? Just the stuff that happens on the course, or maybe chaotic stuff like a terrorist attack on the cup village blowing up all the boats?

    There are guaranteed results, like if the crews don't launch their boats, they can't race. But outside of that, anything could happen. When we see that what we thought was going to happen does happen, we validate the reputation of the analyst and tell ourselves, "Of course, of course, how could it have been any different?". But was he right or was it just an elaborate guess? Hell of a way to make a living.

    I once won a race simply because I arrived on the start line at the correct time and my nearest competitor was 30 secs late due to some misunderstanding of start times. Did I really win or did they lose? If in the previous races he beat me twice, should it be considered that he won the third race anyway? Should we subtract the 30secs and project it into the future result or is starting on time part of the race?

    Ripped spinaker

    Wind shifts

    big waves

    luck


    Whoever hits the finish line first wins. Irritating as it was to hear, Chris Dickson was right:

    regardless of everything else, someone is going to win and someone is going to lose.
     
  14. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Race 7

    Another amazing race with a heart-knocking finish. 2 seconds!
     
  15. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Race 7

    Jerry says:

    Winds were strong, about 15 knots. A beautiful day for racing. New Zealand entered the start from the right and controlled the pre-start maneuvering, but Alinghi managed to get free and the boats started even at speed. The start on a long starboard tack, with Alinghi the windward boat, until after 5 minutes New Zealand provided enough back-wind to force Alinghi to tack away. New Zealand followed a couple minutes later with a 10 to 20 meter lead. !5 minutes after the start, New Zealand has slowly gained, both boats on port tack, with a difference of about 50 meters, so Alinghi tacks to get back close to New Zealand. As the boats get close together, Alinghi gained a bit of faster wind and New Zealand couldn't cross upwind of Alinghi, so New Zealand tacked away back to starboard, forcing Alinghi to tack away. The come together again, with the same result. Again they come together and again the boats have to tack away from each other. If this keeps happening, Alinghi will be forced over the right-side layline. Alinghi tacks back to starboard and New Zealand leaves them alone for awhile, then tacks back towards Alinghi. A right-hand wind shift helps Alinghi, so when the boats come back together New Zealand can't put a lot of back-wind on Alinghi. Both boats go to the left layline, with Alinghi the windward boat and they tack on the layline. Advantage to Alinghi. As they head back to the right, Alinghi is controlling. Curiously, both boats go head to wind until Alinghi bears away to go for the mark, with a 7 seconds lead. Alinghi seems to be a bit faster going down wind, so things look good for Alinghi, but it's close.

    Both boats go to the right (as seen from downwind), with Alinghi 50 meters ahead. Symmetrical spinnakers are up for both boats. Part way down the leg, both boats go into a gybing dual. Suddenly the Alinghi spinnaker collapses for no apparent reason and they have a problem getting it going again, allowing New Zealand to get close and upwind, blocking wind to Alinghi. New Zealand then pulls into the lead. It's been very unusual for one boat the pass the other when they were close together on a downwind leg. New Zealand goes for the left-hand mark and Alinghi goes for the right. At the mark, New Zealand has a 14 second lead. I don't think anyone expected New Zealand to be able to pass Alinghi on a down-wind leg.

    New Zealand goes onto starboard tack and Alinghi goes to the right, with New Zealand 50 meters ahead. New Zealand soon tacks to port to keep for letting Alinghi get too far away. Last time they had a rounding like this (Saturday), the wind shifted right and Alinghi regained the lead, so New Zealand doesn't want the boats to get too far apart. The wind has dropped to 13 to 14 knots. Alinghi then tacks and it's nip and tuck whether New Zealand will have enough lead to cross upwind of Alinghi. It turns out they don't, so once again New Zealand and Alinghi are forced to tack away. New Zealand's lead has dropped from about 60 to 30 meters. They come together again, and again New Zealand can't cross above Alinghi, so both boats tack away. Alinghi seems to be gaining each time they come together. Then Alinghi hits two big waves, nearly stopping the boat, and New Zealand increases its lead. The boats again come together, with Alinghi hoping they are close enough that they won't be forced to tack away, but it doesn't happen. Both boats bounce away again, with Alinghi only 2 minutes away from the right-hand layline. If New Zealand came keep bouncing Alinghi off, they can force Alinghi over the layline, but if Alinghi can gain a slight bit they can come together and stay on starboard tack, like on the first leg. It's anybody's game. A right wind shift helps Alinghi. Alinghi tacks to starboard on the right side layline, and New Zealand goes to the left side layline, then tacks toward Alinghi. Alinghi has right of way. The boats get close and Alinghi appeals for a penalty, saying it had to alter course to avoid New Zealand, and the umpires grant the penalty! Alinghi retakes the lead and crosses 12 seconds ahead at the top mark. So unless something dramatic happens, the Cup stays in Switzerland. If New Zealand had been just a few meters ahead on the third leg, it could have crossed above Alinghi and controlled the race. But that didn't happen.

    They head downwind, with Alinghi ahead by 100 meters, plus New Zealand has to take the penalty. It's time for Alinghi to play it safe and keep a tight cover on New Zealand. No gain to New Zealand half way down the leg. Time is slipping away. New Zealand's two hopes are either a major breakdown on Alinghi or somehow New Zealand would get close enough to Alinghi and force Alinghi into a penalty, negating their own penalty. Neither is likely. Alinghi reaches the layline and heads for the mark. Then a big wind shift goes against New Zealand. When it rains it pours.

    Who would have guess what happened next? Alinghi's spinnaker pole comes off the mast; the spinnaker goes flying. With the wind shift, this "downwind" leg is no longer downwind, and New Zealand takes down its spinnaker and puts up its jib. It's penalty requires that they have to tack, but since they already have the jib up the tack won't cost much time at all. Moreover, with the wind shift Alinghi is no longer on the layline. New Zealand powers into the lead! Amazing. Alinghi has to get going again and reach the new layline and then go for the mark, while New Zealand is well ahead. Alinghi gets it going again, and New Zealand starts a double tack to satisfy the penalty and to go for the mark. Alinghi is almost at the line, but New Zealand is still ahead and completing their tack. But New Zealand goes nearly dead in the water right at the line. Alinghi reaches for it and gets across first. The winning margin is officially one second. One Second! So the cup stays in Switzerland, and they become only the third country to successfully defend the Cup. The commentators note that this has to be the closest race in America's Cup history. While the result is 5-2, one might think Alinghi had a decided advantage. But those who lived through it know better.

    Germany hired a new skipper for their challenge on the next America's Cup and they've ordered a new boat, GER 101. Life goes on.

    Remarkable.
     
  16. Josef

    Josef New Member

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    Anyone else saw todays race?
    Most insane thing I've ever seen ( :
     
  17. Wavedancer

    Wavedancer Upside down? Staff Member

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    Wow, that was amazing. Thanks for the nice write up.

    Can somebody explain the penalty 'turn' TNZ had to do? It didn't look like the 'normal' 360 (one tack + one gybe) we do when we have been bad.

    There was also talk on Versus about TNZ taking the penalty too far away from the finish line. What are the AC rules on this; can one cross the line while doing the penalty, get back and finish properly?
     
  18. Josef

    Josef New Member

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    They don't have to do 360s, they have to do like 270 or whatever, in other words, one tack on the downwinds or a gybe on the upwinds.
    I think it's something like that anyway.

    I guess I should have noticed this thread before making my post =P Been working and shit all night, only slept an hour so I'm abit "off" hehe =P
     
  19. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

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    Next America's Cup

    Jerry says:

    The 33rd race for the America's Cup is scheduled for no earlier than 2009 and no later than 2011. The big surprise (to me anyway) is that they are going to another class of boat, bigger (and faster and with a bigger crew and harder to sail). That sounds to me like it's also more expensive, which might freeze some countries out, but it's presented as a leveling move because everybody has to start over designing new boats without relying so much on previous boats of the same class. It should make for "more exciting" races, but I don't think it can possibly compete with what we just saw. I wonder where this leaves Germany, that just commissioned the building of a new America's Cup class boat. And the British bought an old boat of Alinghi built for the 2003 race, apparently to help them get into the next race.
     

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