Explain Please!!!

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by Unregistered, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    CAN ANYONE HELP ME TRANSLATE THIS STATEMENT I GOT FROM THE QUANTUM SAILS WEB SITE?

    . MAINSHEET/TRAVELER

    You are encouraged to sail your boat with a single purchase in the mainsheet system. To do so you would remove the traveler block and attach the mainsheet directly to the bridle. This is best done by splicing the mainsheet and traveler together. The single purchase eliminates about 10’ of mainsheet line that has to be pulled in at the leeward mark or eased out at the weather mark. There is also that much less line to clutter the floor of the boat. The downside to this system is in high winds, where the power of the 2-1 purchase may be necessary for some to adjust the mainsheet when the loads are high.
     
  2. rjsailnsd

    rjsailnsd Member

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  3. c14_drew

    c14_drew New Member

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    Has anyone done this?? So you eliminate the use of a the traveler?
    ________
    Herbal vaporizer
     
  4. Ed Jones

    Ed Jones Secretary/Vice Commodore Staff Member

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    Richard's right

    Richard's diagram is perfect (but gets a "D" for artistry - sorry, old bean). And yes, the traveler no longer travels. This holds true whether you use single or double purchase. The idea is, when going upwind, to have the boom as close to centerline as possible.
     
  5. rjsailnsd

    rjsailnsd Member

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    Whether you decide to go 2:1 or 1:1, there are other things that are very important to the perfomance of the boat. The line size of factory stock traveller and sheets is too big. I went smaller on the jib sheet, main sheet and traveller line. Tacking the jib is smoother and in light air, trimming the main downwind is easier.
    Also, the traveller height must be high enough that when the main is fully trimmed and centered, the main is just barely closed at the top. If the traveller is too low, its too easy to over trim the main, stopping the boat. A low traveller would also pull the mast back in the boat too much when the main is fully trimmed. The boat is slower and lower when this happens.
     
  6. Dave Lilley

    Dave Lilley New Member

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    I'm sure the 1:1 is ok for light air, but for windy conditions, I wouldn't trade the mechanical advantage of the 2:1 setup for anything. I've sailed when a 1:1 setup would have been perfectly acceptable, but I have also sailed when holding the main with the stock setup 2:1 was difficult at best. I don't think I could have held it with a 1:1 setup.

    My suggestion is that if you are sailing with or near people who have a Capri 14.2 or similar boat, find out what works best for them in your area.

    Dave
     
  7. N7470

    N7470 New Member

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    If you put a block with a becket on the barney post, attach a single bullet block to that and another bullet block on a boom bail on the boom, you can use the split mainsheet system and have some extra purchase too. Just a thought. ;)

    A good way to do this type of mainsheet is to splice two tails(spectra is great for this) onto the mainsheet's core. While not as easy as tying on the tails, it is much cleaner(and stronger). It is not adjustable easily, however, so you might want to just tie your bridle up instead. On C-15s, we use 8:1 or 16:1 vangs that are skipper adjustable to control the leech with stern sheeting. C14.2s are raced in lighter air usually, so a powerful vang would be overkill if it was even permitted. Booms snap with 16:1s too.

    With too much purchases for the sail size, you start loosing feel of the system and get alot more rope in the boat when fully sheeted in. Depending on your upper body strength, 1:1 is the way to go.

    Whatever you do, don't try to reinvent the wheel when it comes to tuning tricks. Just do what the guide says and your boat will sail fast. The rest is up to you.

    Sorry for all the rambling... :rolleyes:
     

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  8. rjsailnsd

    rjsailnsd Member

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    The Quantum tuning guide works the best even with non Quantum sails. Also, be careful that any changes you make to the rigging and the boat fit the class rules. This is important only if you race the boat. There is very little that can be modified on the boat under the rules.
     
  9. Brian Janney

    Brian Janney New Member

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    Richard Hit the nail on the head! Since I helped write the tuning guide I should know.
     
  10. Mrbillyd

    Mrbillyd New Member

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    Switching mine

    I am switching mine over to a 1:1. What Knot do I use to tie the main sheet to the traveler? Also should my Traveler apex to transome centerline be 28 inches? or what should it be?

    Thanks Bill
     
  11. rjsailnsd

    rjsailnsd Member

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    I'm bad with knots so I took the traveler line, found the middle and tied a small simple loop in it (just big enough to slip the end of the main sheet thru), pass the main sheet end thru the traveler loop and tie a figure 8 in the main sheet so it can't slip thru the loop in the traveler. Done. Better solutions are out there but this one has worked for me. Some of us then had sharpie marks every one inch for 5 inches on each side of the traveler where it comes thru the deck holes, we'd adjust the traveler height between races to the different marks if needed depending on the wind.

    28" is a good starting point. Set it there and then see if the main leech is closed in the breeze you sail in. I never liked a closed main leech (think its slow) so I'd lengthen the traveler a little until I got what I wanted. Then if I wanted more leech when sailing, I could always vang sheet.

    Hope this helps you!
     
  12. kdub

    kdub Member

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    Mine is set up like n74's drawing, but I'm not sure I understand what he means by "splicing tails".
     
  13. chemprof

    chemprof Member

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    I think "splicing tails" refers to splicing the traveler (as a Y tail) to the aft end of the mainsheet. Thus the mainsheet IS the traveler too; hence, no knot is required to attach to the traveler.

    -- Edward
     

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