Clothing- Wetsuit alternative?

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by ChrisS, Aug 8, 2008.

  1. ChrisS

    ChrisS New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey folks! I'm looking for a garment or combination of garments that I could wear with my hikers as an alernative to wearing a wetsuit(I hate the things!). Preferably a few layers that would be suitable to wear year-round. I've been looking at Rooster.com and they seem to have some good clothing e.g. The 'Hot top' and 'Polypro top'. What do you guys wear instead of a wetsuit? Has anyone worn the rooster garments? Any ideas?:confused: All help much appreciated! :)
     
  2. Rob B

    Rob B Active Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Depends on the season.

    Summer- Rash guard only.
    Fall- Rash guard, light fleece and spray top
    Winter- Rash guard, t-shirt, heavy fleece and spray top and, (most important) Fleece HAT.
     
  3. Sailorchick

    Sailorchick Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Pretty much all my kit is rooster so I'd recommend there stuff.

    Freezing winter months - Polypro top and leggings, raceskin, hot top, aquafleece, hikers, dry top, hat and neck gaiter. Wearing this lot I survived all of last winter without getting too cold on any days.

    As it gets warmer I take layers away so in the hottest summer days just hikers and a rash vest, adding either a hot top or aqua fleece if needed.
     
  4. 49208

    49208 Tentmaker

    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Just a suggestion for all - it would really help everyone understand what and why if you put the air and water temps that you are dealing with when asking or listing what to wear..
     
  5. Sailorchick

    Sailorchick Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    No idea what the air and water temps are when I am sailing - cold or warm is about as technical as it gets with me. Also there is a lot of personal preference involved in choice of gear. There are lots of people still sailing with bare legs in winter here (nutters is my personal opinion) and others who still wear thermals in summer (I'd melt!).

    Wind strength will effect your choice too as spray can be very chilling on even the warmest of summer days.

    Lots of layers is key as it is then easy to add/remove kit as conditions change to suit you.
     
  6. pugwash

    pugwash Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Sailorchick is right, the Rooster polypro top is amazing - it keeps you warm when it is cold but does not cause you to overheat when the sun shines. My 2c
     
  7. Krycek

    Krycek Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I'm crazy. I sail more by water tempatures than air tempatures. Where I sail the water usually stays above 50 degrees F until right around chistmas. I wear a spaytop, base polypro layer and maybe a water heater if its a bit breezy.

    Once the water temps hit the 40's.... its dry suit time and I am in love with my drysuit.

    I used this philosophy all last winter and never had to bail on a day of frostbiting due to being cold.

    On another psycho note... i found that if I dress a bit less thoroughly I tend to sail better because the consequences of a screw up are more severe. That mindset kept me "skinny thing up" for most of my season.
     
  8. Mattcm

    Mattcm Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I have a similar question - What clothing would be the equivalent of a wetsuit? ie what layers would provide the same or similar warmth?
     
  9. harraz

    harraz New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What about wiping out on a cold day (air/water)? I guess if you are wearing all those layers you will be soaked, heavy and cold!!

    Can some from the "no wet suite" folks tell us their experience?

    Thanks,:confused:
     
  10. Sailorchick

    Sailorchick Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Even with swimming I keep warm enough in the winter. All the layers are fairly thin and the polypro top in particular does not hold water so you don't get that heavy.
    I would never go back to a drysuit as find them far too restrictive in the boat for me and I get colder quicker in a drysuit than in my layers.
     
  11. ChrisS

    ChrisS New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's pretty much what I want to find out too. Any answers?? :confused:
     
  12. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    38
    What's the water temperature?
     
  13. Sailorchick

    Sailorchick Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    No idea on the water temperature - UK south coast in Feb feels freezing to me.
     
  14. Merrily

    Merrily Administrator Staff Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Does anybody know how to find this out? If the temps are in the 50s F or 10 C, yes you can handle that with layers. I'd be really interested to know if layers can handle something colder.
     
  15. Al Black

    Al Black New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    UK South Coast in Feb probably around 8C, 46 Fahrenheit.

    Brrr! :eek:
     
  16. 49208

    49208 Tentmaker

    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    48
  17. Erica in OR

    Erica in OR New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for all the information. We are just getting started, so we'll be dunked lots and needed to figure out the best way to stay warm enough to enjoy learning.

    Erica
     
  18. Kaiser

    Kaiser Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Keep in mind that wet suits come in many different flavors as well... there are separate top halves, overalls (Farmer John/Jane) etc and several different thicknesses available if that works better for you (I've never worn anything but swim shorts and a t shirt on a boat - but I'm a diver too).

    Scubatoys.com is a good place to look.
     
  19. sailingmania

    sailingmania New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    hi i sail my laser wearing my hiking pants a thick u.v protective gill rashvest underneath and a spray top and boots, gloves, and boyancy aid and im fine never get cold but then i rarely capsize. lol

    Jack
     
  20. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi everyone, it's been a while since I've last posted here, but I've just joined the Newport frostbiting fleet so now I'm trying to decide what will work best to stay warm. A lot's already been covered and I plan on going out with a 4:3 wetsuit, hat, boots and gloves to start. Just wondering what types of gloves and boots are the best. Recently I've seen a trend in wearing those blue, waterproof dishwashing gloves. Do those work better than Neoprene gloves? Also, I've just got my standard hiking boots at the moment and I'm afraid my feet will freeze. Do you think I'm better off wearing neoprene socks under them or is there a better/warmer boot available?

    Thanks everyone, hopefully I'll see some of you out there.
     

Share This Page