Capsize

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by edsandra, Apr 6, 2004.

  1. regularman

    regularman New Member

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    Two questions. 1. Is the Hobie float removable for mast storage and boat transporation, etc. 2. Does this float add a lot of extra windage to the mast when sailing on a beam reach, etc. 20 knots of wind is probably a lot more than I would try to sail in anyway, even with the main reefed and the jib furled, but I may get braver as I get more sailing days in. I would imagine the boat would really move in that much wind.
     
  2. edsandra

    edsandra New Member

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    Hobie Float

    You may not be familiar with the Hobie mast, but it piviots. This helps reduce the windage of the Hobie Float by turning it into the wind.

    It would be better if the Hobie Float could be mounted on the C14.2 mast with a rod that would allow the float to piviot like a wind indicator.

    Maybe the 3 litter bottle filled with foam with a rod anchored in the foam and protruding out the side of the bottle could be used in place if the Hobie Float.
     
  3. Art Porter

    Art Porter New Member

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    Float

    One gallon is equal to 4.4 litters.
    A gallon of water weighs about 8 pounds.
    This is the maximum floatation available from a gallon jug.
    In the November 2002 Mainsheet Ed Jones printed an article about Turtling. The Hobie float #30115 produces 24 pounds of floatation and costs about $90.00 in 2002.
    I didn't make my adapter to be quickly removed but I'm sure that could be done. Mine only requires two screws.
    It is the gusts that dump us in Kansas. A nice breeze can have a monster gust every so often. I tend to get too relaxed and don't at times respond quick enough.
    The float is just some insurnace that I will have a good day on the lake even if I do dump a time or two.
    I'm sure I pay a speed penalty by having the float aloft but to me it is worth it.
    A day on the water is still the best medicine I know of.
     
  4. John Mahaffey

    John Mahaffey New Member

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    capsizing

    All of the contributing factors, while seemingly unrelated, were my own fault because I was the captain and it is my boat. The Day and the weather was perfect. Wind was 10mph . I ask a friend to go sailing that admitedly had never been sailing before. While setting up the boat he wanted to help so I ask him to tighten the screws on the motor and attach the safty rope with the pink clip. neither of which I checked. ........ I told him that when the boat leans he should come to the high side. He did not hear, or understand or process the information it dosn't matter. Also I forgot to clip the bungie cord to the centerboard. It stayed down so I thought it was OK . My friend out weighed me by 75 pounds. We came about on our first tack and he did not come to th high side. With that much weight down there I could not lean out far enough so when I leaned in to relaese the main we went over. My mast sank to my surprise. My friend can not swim so he spent several valuable minutes tring to clip his life jacket instead of climbing on top of the hull to help me right the boat. Here is where the forgoten bungie cord came into play. The center board was inside the hull instead of standing up to use as leverage. Also with the boat upside down and the water temp. at about 60 I could not release the main or jib sheet to make it easier to flip. Here are some lessons we can learn....1) Be sure everybody on the boat knows where to be when you come about. ...2) Always check other peoples work (TRUST BUT VERIFY)......3)Communication is critical. Have the crew repeat or at least acknowlege(sp?) your directions and intentions . Oh buy the way I found a bigger jug. HAPPY SAILING John
     
  5. regularman

    regularman New Member

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    Re: Float

    One US gallon is actually 3.78 liters and a gallon of water weighs about 8.3 pounds, but I believe a gallon of air will float a lot more than 8.3 pounds. The deeper it goes into the water the more lifting force it should have due to the increased pressure at that depth. It would be interesting to find out what the formula is. I know a gallon jug is enough to keep a person afloat in the water, but I don't know what a person in water actually weighs compared to on land. I put some foam in my mainsail at the top and I checked it with actual weights in a bathtub before I installed it and it floated over 17 lbs of weights.
     
  6. Larry Conrad

    Larry Conrad New Member

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    Catalina's sail top float is now $125. I have a Hobie float, but it gets in the way of my Windex wind indicator. Actually, I would like to sell the Hobie float. I'll try to post it in the for sale area.
     
  7. edsandra

    edsandra New Member

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    Floatation Pocket

    The Vagabond 14 web site on Yahoo has a really nice illustrated set of instructions for creating a sail pocket. The pocket accepts two pieces of 1/2 inch closed cell foam and attaches to the head of the sail. It provides 18 pounds of floatation.

    The nice thing is you can chose to attach the pocket or not depending on the wind conditions.

    I have tried to attach the instructions to this post. Lets see if it works.

    Ed
     

    Attached Files:

  8. c14_Jeff

    c14_Jeff New Member

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    Just a thought...

    Prior to resealing the mast with expandable foam, as I think it may be time to do so with my '89 Model 2, would it be of any benefit to bouyancy beyond the trapped air to insert a couple of those foam swim noodles into the mast?
     
  9. Art Porter

    Art Porter New Member

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    The time I stuck the mast in the mud about ten feet under I had a 4" round dock bumper tied to the top of the mast.
    It went it under when the wind was hitting the bottom of the boat.
    The foam in the mast and the dock bumper were not enough.
    Floatation force is equal to the weight of the water displaced.
    The bumper was roughly equal in volume to the 3 liter bottle that was suggested earlier.
    Two have talked of foam sheet inside pockets that generate 17 or 18 pounds of floatation This is roughly equal to three times that of a three liter float.
    This is almost equal to the Hobie float that produces 24 pounds.
     
  10. endkaos

    endkaos New Member

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    Re: Just a thought...

    Those foam noodles don't last much more than one season around my house before it starts to desinegrate. Also, noodles really don't have much bouncy. A kid can sink one quickly. I don't think I would want to use that in my mast.
     
  11. c14_Jeff

    c14_Jeff New Member

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    See, I knew someone here would have more experience with a swim noodle than me. Thanks for the input, endkaos!

    Larry, there is an adapter that I saw in the APS catalog -- the Davis Universal Masthead Mount -- that extends a Windex 15 or Sport 10 away from masthead obstructions. Might allow you to have the Hobie float and the Windex at same time. Cost is $18.35 at APS. How much stuff you want atop the mast is another question.
     
  12. skysurfer3

    skysurfer3 New Member

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  13. Art Porter

    Art Porter New Member

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    Hobie float #30115

    This is the one I have.

    The Hobie float #30115 produces 24 pounds of floatation and costs about $90.00 in 2002.

    It does not fit without an adapter of some sort.
    I made mine from mohogany
     

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