Best Hull Modification

Discussion in 'Laser Talk' started by macwas16, Oct 22, 2002.

  1. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've lately been restoring a 1974 laser at my yacht yard and there is a brand new stock laser right next to it. So since i've had some time to compare the two, i wanted to ask you opinion on the best hull modification. here are the changes i've noticed.

    * plastic handrails
    * automatic bailer
    * centerboard brake
    * screw caps
    * rudder mounts
    * all new blue deck hardware (fairleads, stern plug assembly, bow handle)

    there are also a few foil differences i've noticed (probobly the most noticeably).

    * fiberglass centerboard
    * fiberglass rudder

    For rig and sail difference there are some too.

    * invention of the radial rig and sail
    * invention of the 4.7 rig and sail
    * mk6 radial sail
    * blue end caps to spars
    * aluminum clam cleats

    So tell me what you think the most inportant change is yet in all catagories...
     
  2. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ummm...k

    i'm sorry i forgot to add the new aluminum racing tiller and extension as an option.
     
  3. Darryn

    Darryn New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The bailer is almost essential but very expensive( for what it is) and easy to break. It does work well though.
    The Centreboard brake is a necessary part of the boat.
    As for the rest, keep what you've got.
     
  4. kwilson

    kwilson New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Are you asking for the best modification that you can make to your boat in regards to a newer modal or what the differances are..??

    I would love to see a bigger rudder. I know at one time the World Council proposed a larger rudder because the standard fit is to small; it stalls much to easily and at time is difficult to control the boat in offwind positions. With a retrofit replacement rudder that is bigger it would add considerable stability to the boat at speed.
     
  5. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ummm...k

    i agree with the rudder. past a certain point of heel somewhere around 30 degrees or so you lose complete control of the boat. it is the biggest flaw in the boat.

    the reason for the post was just really listing the changes i've seen. you can say whats the most crucial change or just comment on anything. i just posted for the chance to compare boats 29 years apart.

    enjoy! :D
     
  6. Darryn

    Darryn New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    "i agree with the rudder. past a certain point of heel somewhere around 30 degrees or so you lose complete control of the boat. it is the biggest flaw in the boat"

    Well your not supposed to sail it with the gunnels in the water :lol:

    I reckon the biggest flaw is the weight of thecentreboard, my two rudders and two centreboards off my catamaran still only weigh in total 3/4 what my 1 Laser centreboard weighs.
     
  7. Goonie

    Goonie Guest

    What kind of catamaran do you sail?

    Seth
     
  8. kwilson

    kwilson New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    [quote:dcd4a32376="Darryn"]"i agree with the rudder. past a certain point of heel somewhere around 30 degrees or so you lose complete control of the boat. it is the biggest flaw in the boat"

    Well your not supposed to sail it with the gunnels in the water :lol:

    I reckon the biggest flaw is the weight of thecentreboard, my two rudders and two centreboards off my catamaran still only weigh in total 3/4 what my 1 Laser centreboard weighs.[/quote:dcd4a32376]


    The problem with increasing the weight of the CB would be the ease by which it can be trimmed. For lighter weight sailors it can be challenging to trim the CB to certain positions. It may ultimatley require a purchase system to impact this trim. Once you dismiss the CB weight change the next logical place to look is the rudder to increase stability. This can be done without changing the rudder casement....just the blade itself....and easy change.

    I agree.....if your at 30deg you'd probably be faster swimming. :lol:
     
  9. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ummm...k

    [quote:c4b0fec1ef]
    my two rudders and two centreboards off my catamaran still only weigh in total 3/4 what my 1 Laser centreboard weighs.[/quote:c4b0fec1ef]

    i believe his point was that the centerboard weigh TOO much.
     
  10. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ummm...k

    another point i wanted to make was that 30 degrees isn't reallyTHAT much. surely you don't want to sail that way for i'd be far to slow. but if you're at 90 when you capsize, then at 30 you're at 1/3 that angle. take a look at a protractor or something. however maybe i was wrong and perhaps at maybe 20 or 25 degrees you lose all control.
     
  11. kwilson

    kwilson New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: ummm...k

    [quote:7dd0a79841="macwas16"][quote:7dd0a79841]
    my two rudders and two centreboards off my catamaran still only weigh in total 3/4 what my 1 Laser centreboard weighs.[/quote:7dd0a79841]

    i believe his point was that the centerboard weigh TOO much.[/quote:7dd0a79841]


    Less weight .... :?: :?: I wonder if the CB weight helps in the couterbalance (ballast) of the rig in any way. If not then why didn't they create it completly weightless in the beginning.

    Angle:

    Depends on what position of sail your at. Are you trying to reduce wetted surface ...i.e. sailing by the lee or driving upwind.
     
  12. macwas16

    macwas16 New Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ummm...k

    i dought i actually is meant for ballast. you're weight alone is meant for that. i just is made so you dont slip to leward. even the vonde globe boats have centerboards for that reason.
     
  13. Darryn

    Darryn New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I also race a Mosquito Catamaran, Australian design with emphasis on light weight and efficient design. Platform weight is 120lbs and sail area 126 square feet. It is faster then Hobie 17/18 but generally not as quick as Hobie 20. There very fragile and the constant development is costly and time consuming. I like my laser even more for those reasons, more sailing less fixing :p
    http://www.mossie.net/
     
  14. will162878

    will162878 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You have to heel a lot more than 20º to get the rudder out the water. 25º is about gunwhale breaking surface heel as 20-22º is the optimum heel angle for reducing wetted surface area - check out drLaser tech articles. The heavy CB is ceratinly to maintain the original weight of the wooden blades. But the weight is not what makes it hard to pull up. Try pulling from infront and you'll find it a lot easier. I know this is inpractical in a race but it shows that the reason it is hard to rasie is not becasue of weight but of the angle of the slot.
     
  15. will162878

    will162878 New Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't think you should be complaining about heavy boards because every ounce down there is contributing a tiny bit to cancelling out the heeling moment of the rig. The laser centreboard is very long (front to back) compared to most dinghies of similar size which gives a large aerofoil area which means it provides a lot of lift (stopping you from sliding to leeward) without too much depth. The deeper a board, the more lift will be produced but it will also heel the boat more so a shallower but longer (front/back) board provides as much lift but less heeling. The problem with increasing fore-aft length of th eboard is that the longer it is, the less manoeverable the boat becomes. Because the laser board is a daggerboard (it slides up and down instead of pivoting) it can be a lot longer (fore/aft) but has to be shallower so the top doesn't catch the boom. This compromise is obviously effective because nobody would call the laser difficult to manoever or slow to respond to tiller/weight movements.
     

Share This Page