Bailer Balls

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by NightSailor, May 12, 2010.

  1. NightSailor

    NightSailor Captain

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    I am not particularly impressed by the bailer on any of my Sunfishes. I've seen people stuff styrofoam in there to try to put the ball in the right place to try and make it work.

    Now I see a new product with is a donut shape black plastic part that encircles the ball and I'm told attaches to it, to allow it seat properly--and supposedly make the bailer work as it should.

    Does anyone have any experience with these parts? Your impressions?
     
  2. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    Would you mind posting the link to this enhancement so we can see it and how it works?

    Thanks
     
  3. NightSailor

    NightSailor Captain

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    http://www.shopsoundboatworks.com/79332-bailer-ball-5-new793325.html

    Of course they don't have any in stock, or I would have bought a few. I called up and was told the balls fit captive in the donut. The donut allows them to seal better.

    I'll call Torresen and see if they have any. But I don't see the point in paying more for shipping than they parts cost themselves. Next time I have a big order I'll pick some up.
     
  4. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    I don't think you are seeing a new innovation.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The p/n 91031 Bailer Ball and Seat are standard pieces of the present bailer assembly.

    If the bailer you have is missing either or both of this part duo, it's no wonder you are disappointed with the function.

    There's no question the bailer leaves something to be desired. The buoyancy of the ball is barely adequate to seal it tightly against the rubber seat to begin with. If the seat is worn and/or damaged (or missing altogether) or the float ball dirty, a good seal is not very likely.

    [​IMG]

    Combine this with the fact the cockpit floor is at or below the waterline when someone's aboard..., and that positive draining requires fairly good forward motion of the boat, the bailer is often a very misunderstood device.

    Before ordering parts you may want to review what the setup manual says about proper assembly and function...
    .
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Fred P

    Fred P Member

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    I can't figure out this obsession for a perfect automatic bailer. Is everyone wearing their Sunday shoes that they don't want to get wet?
    The bailer works as designed. I doubt a donut will help much. Save your money and enjoy the wetness!
    Only a small bilge pump working from a battery on board will do a better job.

    Fred
     
  6. chau8238

    chau8238 67 Sunfish

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    I still need to get a new bailer. Why do they have to be soo expensive though.
     
  7. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    No Batteries Required

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Fred P

    Fred P Member

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    Amen, Wayne!

    Fred
     
  9. NightSailor

    NightSailor Captain

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    I agree. They are too expensive. The cost to produce these items is quite low.
     
  10. Boardwax680

    Boardwax680 Privateer

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    Remember, a boat, no matter the type or size, is a black hole in the water one throws money into with no to little expectation of a reasonable return. :rolleyes:
     
  11. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    Really...., I'm sorry to hear that.

    Mine returns to me 1000x more pleasure and fun than the $ investment I put into it.


    .
     
  12. PBA

    PBA Member

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    The large sponge method really is a quick and easy way to remove water from inside the hull, via an inspection port.
     
  13. Zeppo

    Zeppo Member

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    I imagine the bailer assembly is a requirement for class legality, however, if this is not a concern it would make a lovely gift for somebody on your Sh__ list. As mentioned a sponge, or bleach bottle will do a fine job of removing water. Because it protrudes so much the bailer is easy to damage, as mine was so I turfed the bailer and Marine-Texed the hole, end of story.
     
  14. Boardwax680

    Boardwax680 Privateer

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    Wayne: Sorry, was being a pessimist, I'm no where close to getting my hulls wet for another few weeks; I have to spend money on them first.
     
  15. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    They can be handy for letting rain water OUT.


    [​IMG]
     
  16. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    The Yachters say "boat" stands for

    Bust
    Out
    Another
    Thousand

    but it must all be worth it, regardless. :cool:
     
  17. fbjru

    fbjru Member

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    This question about bailer's seems to come up quite often. Alot of people say they keep theirs plugged all the time.

    I never use the plug, my bailer is always open and I never notice a water problem. The is always about a cup or two of water in my cockpit.

    So...

    Are my bailer's just working really good?

    Do I have lower expectations in the bailer and am more easily satisfied? Not bothered by the small amounts of water in the cockpit.

    Or, am I doing something right that others arn't by always keeping it open.



    I think alot of this discussion is based on personal preference and expectations.

    Maybe I'm too use to collegiate 420's, where on a rough day you are lucky when you don't have to bail out a small bathtub.
     
  18. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    Sounds like your bailer is working as it should. Down the road, if some backwash starts gurgling up into the cockpit, it'll be time to clean the ball and rubber seat or replace them.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]



    Since the bailer opening sits about 1/4" above the cockpit floor, unless you can Harry Potter the last little bit into the drain hole, there will always be something to sponge up.

    [​IMG]


    The bailer function is often misunderstood. Once you understand the boat needs to be in motion..., and at a pretty fair clip, it's not much of a problem to get a properly maintained bailer to drain as it should. Leak-back is another issue.


    I don't think that makes any difference. Most of us put the plug in because our bailers leak-back a little.

    .
     
  19. Jarnett

    Jarnett New Member

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    i have my 30$ sunfish i recently fixed up. its from the 60's.

    the bailer ball is missing and theres no plug. when i sit still or go slow my pit fills up but when i get back up to speed not only do i get the joy of sailing fast and hiking out. i also get to watch the bailer suck all the water out :)

    im debating if its worth the money to replace it.
     
  20. Wayne

    Wayne Member Emeritus

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    If only the purchase price had a bearing on part cost.

    Should you tire of your personal tide generator, there is a less expensive alternative, a generic bailer plug.

    [​IMG]
     

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