Wooden backbone

#3
No, the area of the coaming is the only deck attachment area where backing isn't found. Let me throw out this - if you are thinking of a bracket mounted compass a line will catch it eventually and launch it overboard. The better mousetrap is the flush mount like a Silva/Nexus Regatta Dinghy 85, Ritchie X-port, or Ritchie 58W.
 
Thread starter #4
It is a ritchie 58w, I just want to know if I drive 2 1/2 inch screws into the deck in the area where the alcort serial number plate is usualy mounted if it will drive into wood or is it just a thin layer of fiberglass.
 
#6
if I drive 2 1/2 inch screws into the deck in the area where the alcort serial number plate is usualy mounted if it will drive into wood or is it just a thin layer of fiberglass.

A quarter inch of fiberglss and 2-1/4" of air. Even if a backing were there you'd still be grabbing over an inch of air. Then again, you could get an even longer screw and go for both deck and bottom hull :eek:

A 1/2" should be plenty enough unless you are really trying to put the screws to your boat. :rolleyes:

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#7
I'll have to agree with Dan's first post. We had several bracket mounted compasses in the fleet and either the screws ripped out or if fastened securely ended up in a caught line and a capsize.
We found the "solution" in one of the Sunfish books where they mounted a compass into the cover plate of an inspection port. We'd buy an extra cover to keep the expensive compass safe from damage or light fingers; with the compass and cover safe at home.
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
#8
A 'no holes' approach is to mount the compass on a block and to use hook and loop (Velcro) to attach the block to the deck. So as not to loose the compass, I have a loose line tied around the mast and the bracket that holds the compass.

From time to time, the line attached to my daggerboard will take my compass off its mooring because the line will catch on a protruding screw (see previous posts). This problem is less likely to happen with simple compasses that have no protruding screws etc.
I can't predict how the Ritchie X-10 (see huh825 post) will behave in this respect; just try it to see if there will be 'hang-ups'.

Some simple compasses (without obvious protrusions as far as I can tell from the pictures in the West Marine catalog) include the Ritchie Kayaker (XP-99) and the Ritchie Trek TR-33 compass.
 
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