where to put ports on a Phantom?

Thread starter #1
I have a waterlogged phantom I was given weighs 165 lbs and I want to put 2 ports in...are the best locations the same as a sunfish...between daggerboard and coaming ?6 inch from rudder?also this boat is wider than my sunfish...seems it would be fater,less drag.
 
#2
I am not sure where to put ports in a Phantom but don't try to install a drain plug in the transom. The interior of the Phantom is solid foam near the transom (unlike the Sunfish.) I put one in on a project boat last summer and then had to drill through 2' of foam to reach the interior and even then it never worked all that well. That said, I like the Phantom. It sails well and has a very well thought out rig. I sailed it in Glen Lake, Michigan for a week at a family reunion but it did leak. I finally found the the leak where the cockpit bailer attaches - had to repair the bailer assembly hole with thickened WEST epoxy.

Alan Glos
 

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Thread starter #3
I am not sure where to put ports in a Phantom but don't try to install a drain plug in the transom. The interior of the Phantom is solid foam near the transom (unlike the Sunfish.) I put one in on a project boat last summer and then had to drill through 2' of foam to reach the interior and even then it never worked all that well. That said, I like the Phantom. It sails well and has a very well thought out rig. I sailed it in Glen Lake, Michigan for a week at a family reunion but it did leak. I finally found the the leak where the cockpit bailer attaches - had to repair the bailer assembly hole with thickened WEST epoxy.

Alan Glos
Thanks so much for that info and a pic of your boat.I think I will put a 5 inch port where there is a depression between the coming an d the dartboard slot...please tell me did you feel the phantom was faster or more maneuverable than the sunfish?
 
#4
The consensus is that a well sailed Sunfish is faster than a Phantom. The Phantom is a slightly larger (read: more drag) and a little heavier. Maybe somebody following this
post has access to the Portsmouth handicap ratings for both boats. I am guessing the Sunfish is a little faster. The Sunfish is a remarkably fast boat for its size and rig. The "new" hydrodynamic dagger board and the North race cuts sail all help.

Alan Glos
 
#5
I can tell you where one can go safely: the circle by the centerboard slot. I put one in mine before I sold it. It was a piece of cake and looked like someone at the factory had intended it to be there. Loved that boat, great sailer!
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#7
Also, at this point most Phantom sails will be old and blown out, so likely slower than the equipment used when the Portsmouth number was created. The sail Alan posted the pic of looks almost new - and it is a very attractive color.

The Phantom looks like a nice, well-designed boat that should provide a lot of fun, and the speed difference is very small and you won’t notice it at all while daysailing.
 
Thread starter #8
I can tell you where one can go safely: the circle by the centerboard slot. I put one in mine before I sold it. It was a piece of cake and looked like someone at the factory had intended it to be there. Loved that boat, great sailer!
Thanks so much for that info and i intend to put it there...
 
Thread starter #9
The consensus is that a well sailed Sunfish is faster than a Phantom. The Phantom is a slightly larger (read: more drag) and a little heavier. Maybe somebody following this
post has access to the Portsmouth handicap ratings for both boats. I am guessing the Sunfish is a little faster. The Sunfish is a remarkably fast boat for its size and rig. The "new" hydrodynamic dagger board and the North race cuts sail all help.

Alan Glos
But the phantom has a listed weight of 120 while the sunfish has a weight listed of 130 or is all that approximations?thanks....also I seem to hear slot of phantoms have problems with their bailers...might it be better to remove it and just use a plug??I did that on my sunfish...Thanks again...
 
Thread starter #10
At the risk of encouraging thread drift, here are some Portsmouth D-PN numbers. As Alan notes, Portsmouth numbers are used to handicap boats: the lower the D-PN the faster the boat (note that D-PNs are sometimes revised).
Source: http://www.humboldtyachtclub.org/sites/default/files/Centerboard Classes # US Sailing.pdf
One would think that the phantom would be faster due to it's width.the reasoning for that is with wind surfing boards they totally changed the design to make them wider especially in the stern so that they don't drag ,and release from the water and plane quicker.
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#11
One would think that the phantom would be faster due to it's width.the reasoning for that is with wind surfing boards they totally changed the design to make them wider especially in the stern so that they don't drag ,and release from the water and plane quicker.
All true, but I think those boards are quite short and a lot of the board is out of the water when planing, where most of the Phantom will still be in the water. But it is entirely possible a Phantom IS faster offwind than a Sunfish but slower upwind.

Is the Phantom daggerboard foil shaped? The current Sunfish ones are and that made for a big improvement upwind.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#12
The consensus is that a well sailed Sunfish is faster than a Phantom. The Phantom is a slightly larger (read: more drag) and a little heavier. Maybe somebody following this post has access to the Portsmouth handicap ratings for both boats. I am guessing the Sunfish is a little faster. The Sunfish is a remarkably fast boat for its size and rig. The "new" hydrodynamic dagger board and the North race cuts sail all help.

Alan Glos
Favorable Portsmouth handicap ratings may be affected by statistics—that is, the sheer force of Sunfish numbers.

The number of Phantoms (and clonefish) raced is relatively low. Take the skipper of the "winningest" Sunfish, and put him in a Phantom, and the stats for Phantoms would improve. IMHO.
 
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