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What Things Most Newbies Wouldn't Think of That Need to be Onboard?

Pingpro

New Member
The title says it all.... Maiden voyage today to get my boat from Naples to Isle of Capri and when we got to the gulf and tried to hoist the mainsail, the mainsail equivalent of hanks on the jib (I don't know what you call the plastic pieces on the main luff that you slide into the mast) had a really hard time sliding up the mast's groove and we gave up. The more experienced sailor I was sailing with asked if I had any wax or any sort of lubricant to help the process and I had never heard of sailmaker's wax (which is what I think I need) and I had taken the liquid wrench and WD40 off the boat. Since we couldn't hoist the main, we had to motor 3.5 hours.... bummer.

What other things do you find essential to keep on the boat?

As always, thanks in advance for your replies. Also, I had just stepped the mast the day before in a marina and had no reason to think I wouldn't be able to hoist the mainsail.

-Christian
 

VinceH

Member
Well, apparently you got the mast up successfully. Good for you! I guess you know , but it's worthwhile to check (test) out all of the important "stuff" you'll need on the boat to make it work. I guess sails would be in that category. ...it being a sailboat.

Ok. 'nuff joking.
Those are sail slides. I'll tell you that I've never seen a main on a J/24 that used sail slides. So I suggest that you do some checking to make sure that it really fits your boat. It's typical that the bolt rope, sewn into the luff of the sail, slides into the groove in the mast and no sail slides are used. I suppose it could be that they may have used slides in early days, but I don't know that. One of my many (too many) mains is marked that it was measured for the 1985 J/24 midwinter's, and it has no slides. Pretty old. So I'd be suspicious of that sail of yours, particularly since there's a problem with the slides working. I would add that I can't imagine what would make them bind unless they're the wrong size for the mast track. Another thing that makes me doubt your main. Does it have a J/24 class insignia, or label at the tack?

Btw, that 1985 sail is in decent useable condition if you want it. I guess $100 plus shipping. Not appropriate for racing, but it's got some life. It's not a rag.

Vince
 

Pingpro

New Member
Thanks Vince.

Didn't have the mast up until the marina and I was a bit anxious to get out. Never thought the main wouldn't go up, but I deserve some ribbing.. The mainsail does have J/24 labeling and the sail slides fit well enough. I'm working on lubing the sail track and will get back to you. Very interesting that many (most it seems) mainsails have the bolt rope. I have 9 different sails that came with the boat and at least two mains. I will look at the second one and see if its the bolt rope type. The thing is that the previous owner was using that deck stepped mast and the boom I'm using now with the mainsail I'm using. I wonder if I need to look at the other boom and mainsail (I have two booms) to see if they are more meant for the mast I'm using.

Thank you, as always, I learned a bunch. Had no idea that sail slides were not very common. If needed, I'll jump on your offer.

Thanks,
Christian
 

VinceH

Member
About the last part... I think they aren't so common on smaller boats, and I think the J/24 would be in that category. They just might have used them in early days though.

About your original question though- I think a few tools, a bucket, and some lengths of line in a couple of sizes. Make sure the sailing gear is all intact and working. I can't think of much else. No crossed halyards inside the mast. That will really cause trouble.

Interesting that you have two booms too. Wonder why?

Vince
 

Pingpro

New Member
Previous owner was a collector I guess (I have tons of spares). I did check and the other main has slides as well. Both are definitely J/24 sails by North Sails. See the pic (I know I need to secure the tack). I did lube the sail track and was able to fix 3 areas that were a bit sticky and all is good now. My wife tried to video the lubing of the sail track but got distracted... must have been something shiny somewhere. Pic of the prep attached, basically just took a piece of 2 x 4, put a couple roofing nails in one side to go in the track and eye hooks on the top and bottom for the main halyard and another line to get it down, then duct taped the lube can to the 2x4 and cut the spray guide on the nozzle to just fit inside the sail track. Taped the thing so it was spraying and took it up and down the track.

Thanks as always Vince.

-Christian
 

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VinceH

Member
I like the "automatic sail track lubricator" gizmo. Way cool!
Good luck with everything. That first real sail will be, or was, great I'm sure.
 
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