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What kinda of sailboat?? I just got my first sailboat ⛵️ Could I get help identifying it

Hello everybody in sailing forums I am new to the forum I just recently went sailing and got lessons my first time on Tuesday on Wednesday I purchased my first boat from a really nice gentleman outside of Austin I would really love to get some help to identify this boat so I can attempt to restore it back to its original design or better and so I can also get a better idea of what parts I might need or update rigging new ropes and sail repair .

I am beyond excited about this boat and can’t wait to fix it up and get it back on the water it is always been a dream of mine and now I finally have something to work with if anyone can help me out and figure out what type of boat and maybe some pictures of the originals that would be amazing thank you for your time. Jacob in Texas
 

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deadfast

New Member
Your first fixer upper sailer? Very nice, and welcome to sailing as well! I'm no pro, so someone more knowledgeable may correct me, but I've been told that a gentle handwashing in Oxyclean and air drying can help clean up those sails a bit. No bleach, ammonia or heavy detergent products. Gotta be gentle on those synthetic fibers. And once you have them clean and dry, fold them up neatly and store them in their sailbags or covered in the house somewhere so they don't collect new dust or mystery stains. (Don't forget to remove the batons and store them with the sail). Rain and weather isn't good for the boat in general (invest in a tarp for your new girl), and plain sunlight chemically breaks down fiberglass and Dacron sails over time.

Looks like she's got a wooden dagger-board, pretty cool old detail (...keel, centerboard...Not sure which one it would be in this case. Sorry, self-taught so my terminology is lacking and I'm a fellow fixer-upper sailor myself). That makes her probably a pre-70's model if I had to wager a wild guess. Nothing wrong with that as long as the hull is still solid. In most cases, the older the fiberglass boat, the thicker they layered the fiberglass.

From my experience in getting a few old birds back in the wind, if you're pretty handy with wood, paint, hand tools, metal bolts and fasteners, getting the boat up to par is thankfully self-evident in most cases. If something looks jenky, it probably is and may need addressed. Look for any sign of rust or corrosion on the standing rigging, damage to the cables like fraying or kinks. Same goes with the blocks and hardware that attach the cables to the boat (someone more experienced help me out with the terms : P) You don't want to risk it with ones that are bent, kinked, rusted, loose, or missing parts/badly improvised.

In terms of the sheets (ropes. Hey, I got one!), I would aim for buying ones made for sailboats that erm...roughly match the diameter of the pulleys they'll be riding in. A larger rope is naturally easier to grip than a dinky one and less likely to slide in your hands. If you can reason out the make and year of her, you may be able to find a company online that sells a complete set. From what I've seen, they're generally pretty affordable.

Looks like she's going to need a new wooden tiller, shouldn't be hard to find an appropriately shaped piece of timber and fashion a suitable replacement. Longevity varies based on the wood you use and how you finish it. That wooden daggerboard still seems pretty solid from what can be seen, but it could do with some refinishing to protect it. Does she have her rudder? I didn't see it in any of the pictures. Heh, I'll leave it there for now. I don't want to *totally bombard you.
 
Your first fixer upper sailer? Very nice, and welcome to sailing as well! I'm no pro, so someone more knowledgeable may correct me, but I've been told that a gentle handwashing in Oxyclean and air drying can help clean up those sails a bit. No bleach, ammonia or heavy detergent products. Gotta be gentle on those synthetic fibers. And once you have them clean and dry, fold them up neatly and store them in their sailbags or covered in the house somewhere so they don't collect new dust or mystery stains. (Don't forget to remove the batons and store them with the sail). Rain and weather isn't good for the boat in general (invest in a tarp for your new girl), and plain sunlight chemically breaks down fiberglass and Dacron sails over time.

Looks like she's got a wooden dagger-board, pretty cool old detail (...keel, centerboard...Not sure which one it would be in this case. Sorry, self-taught so my terminology is lacking and I'm a fellow fixer-upper sailor myself). That makes her probably a pre-70's model if I had to wager a wild guess. Nothing wrong with that as long as the hull is still solid. In most cases, the older the fiberglass boat, the thicker they layered the fiberglass.

From my experience in getting a few old birds back in the wind, if you're pretty handy with wood, paint, hand tools, metal bolts and fasteners, getting the boat up to par is thankfully self-evident in most cases. If something looks jenky, it probably is and may need addressed. Look for any sign of rust or corrosion on the standing rigging, damage to the cables like fraying or kinks. Same goes with the blocks and hardware that attach the cables to the boat (someone more experienced help me out with the terms : P) You don't want to risk it with ones that are bent, kinked, rusted, loose, or missing parts/badly improvised.

In terms of the sheets (ropes. Hey, I got one!), I would aim for buying ones made for sailboats that erm...roughly match the diameter of the pulleys they'll be riding in. A larger rope is naturally easier to grip than a dinky one and less likely to slide in your hands. If you can reason out the make and year of her, you may be able to find a company online that sells a complete set. From what I've seen, they're generally pretty affordable.

Looks like she's going to need a new wooden tiller, shouldn't be hard to find an appropriately shaped piece of timber and fashion a suitable replacement. Longevity varies based on the wood you use and how you finish it. That wooden daggerboard still seems pretty solid from what can be seen, but it could do with some refinishing to protect it. Does she have her rudder? I didn't see it in any of the pictures. Heh, I'll leave it there for now. I don't want to *totally bombard you.
Thank you I got some work to do ⛵⚒
 

deadfast

New Member
Take some progress pics and keep it posted. One of my favorite things to bring a boat back to life that thought it would never see water again. The sailboats, they'll talk to ya if you know how to listen.
 
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