what about restoring "crispness" to old sails

Thread starter #1
Hi guys surfing around the internet i found this advice.

quote:
Mix polyester resin with mentholated spirits (20% metho) This thins out the resin and makes it easier to work. Then work the resin into the sail, one side only needed, with a rag. Try to spread it as much as you can as you don’t need to soak the sail, the resin only need to be rubbed into the surface. I use about 250ml per 8m2 of sail. That is about $10. Leave the sail a couple of days and you will have a crisp sail again. Leave for about a week then use. You have just saved thousands on the cost of a new sail.

the natural consensus is that the shape will still be baggy and performance wont be greatly increased, BUT the experimenter side of me wants to try this theory;):p. (i know its not the greatest idea but common guys lets do a brainstorm;) )

any ideas or alternatives of how can i do this?
1- resin with no hardener ????
2- can epoxy be used??
3-what about clear waterbased polyester resin, diluted with water
4-what percentage of resin/acetone or denatured alcohol
5- read on a kite forum they use scothguard waterproof spray to return the crispy feeling to kites


 
Thread starter #2
in all seriousness sailrite offers sail reconditioning they re-cut re-shape old sails and then press the old sail with resins to return the crispiness. So the re-resin is not out of the blue concept .
i guess the number 6 question is how can we recreate the sailrite process of applying resin back to the sails in a DIY way:confused:
 
#3
A practical application problem:

The sail needs to be spread out on a properly curved surface so you get the right shape and are not gluing it into a wadded up mess.

Got a 25 ft X 20 ft (for the sails used on a boat under 20 ft long...) "table" you can warp to the curves?

*************


1- resin with no hardener ???? will just be applying goo that you'll need to wash out of the sail
2- can epoxy be used?? Good way to turn the sail into a brittle rock that won't work properly
3-what about clear waterbased polyester resin, diluted with water. Might work temporarily... Might not. If it fails it can destroy the sail
4-what percentage of resin/acetone or denatured alcohol Part of why you pay the professionals... they know how to do it right
5- read on a kite forum they use scothguard waterproof spray to return the crispy feeling to kites Would probably help a bit.
 

oldpaint

Active Member
#5
Make sure to use the low setting, usually marked polyester, when you iron in the starch. Then you just need to keep the sail dry! Scotchguard seems more promising.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#6
Properly thinned, each of these ideas has some merit (except the "goo" part) :oops:. Why not try each of these ideas on different sections of your sail?

I've used an expensive water-based stain on wood which, properly thinned, might work. I had been considering spray-starch and an iron set on low, but that sounded too much like "work". :confused:

An inexpensive $2 "try" could be found here:
Log Home Stain | UV Guard Advance Clear Wood Finish- Sample
 
Thread starter #7
thxs guys,definitely sound like fun experiments, do i really need to iron the sail for starch to work?? or can i just spray and wait to dry??
 

oldpaint

Active Member
#8
I'm not sure how well it would stand up to a wet environment, with or without ironing, but it would be a cheap to try it and if it doesn't stand up to water, just hose it off and try something else.
 
Thread starter #10
thxs sailcrafti that sounds good:) (around how much you think postage would be?


A practical application problem:

The sail needs to be spread out on a properly curved surface so you get the right shape and are not gluing it into a wadded up mess.

Got a 25 ft X 20 ft (for the sails used on a boat under 20 ft long...) "table" you can warp to the curves?
fhhuber i dont get the reason for the warp table? i was under the impression i just needed to rub the sails with the resin and a more or less straight table to avoid to many wrinkles.
 
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