Video: How To Get In Way Over Your Head... Literally

#21
I can sort of see the rationale of the "life line", but if you don't have the mainsheet cleated and your line isn't a tangled mess, I have a hard time seeing how the boat would sail off that far without you. Maybe I'm wrong. I'd personally avoid that extra bit of line to add confusion.
 
#24
I did it many years ago, Sunfish sailed downwind just fine without me. I know
the Sunfish I was using had excessive weather helm but the wind was very light.
I don't see any reason for a saftey line in a small inland lake. Shore is close and
usually there are eyes on the lake. Out in a bay with currents far from shore,
no eyes on you, well, your boat is your survival. If you're single handing a keel boat
or the only watch on deck you need a saftey line. I can see how it translates down
to a Sunfish if you push the recreational aspects of the Sunfish a little farther than
they were intended. The guy did do some important things correctly. He had a
wet suit, a life jacket and most importantly, a commitment to stay with the boat.
I can only fault him with not sticking close to shore during the learning process
and not having a friend on shore keeping eyes on him. Well, maybe that and
tying a milk jug to the mast.
Interesting take on this, Webfoot. Thank you.
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
#25
Let's summarize ('Best Practices'):
  • In strong winds, do not cleat the main sheet
  • If you do capsize, try to hang on to something on the boat
  • If the boat does not capsize but simply gets away from you, it will turn into the wind if the sheet is not tied
  • If the boat does capsize, it won't go far...
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#26
Let's summarize ('Best Practices'):
  • In strong winds, do not cleat the main sheet
  • If you do capsize, try to hang on to something on the boat
  • If the boat does not capsize but simply gets away from you, it will turn into the wind if the sheet is not tied
  • If the boat does capsize, it won't go far...
:cool: Because I've installed a cam cleat to control the halyard, I can secure the bitter end to an ankle, and observe my Sunfish "at sail" from behind after a capsize. :confused: (But eventually drop the sail—saving the day!) :)

Maybe I shouldn't write early in the morning. :rolleyes:

I like the idea of sailing within a lake's shorelines much better. ( :( No sea lions climbing aboard—no sharks—just alligators :oops: ).


.
 
#27
That seal is a cool customer. B^)

I agree. I think the number one 'best-practice' point here is to try and have your hairy learning experiences on a lake, by the shore and with/around other sailors.
 
Top