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Two questions from a newbie to J/24 sailing ...

billveno83

New Member
There is supposedly no such thing as a dumb question, so here goes.
I have purchased a 1986 J/24 that I won’t get to see in person until May (way too cheap to not make a purchase), but hull #4249 looks pretty solid and survey is coming. Boat did not include a motor.

Meanwhile, I am doing the favorite winter pastime of New England sailors - and thinking and planning for the short warm weather season (hopefully post-Covid) in 2021.
My two questions are -
1) the mechanics of using an outboard (after owning and racing 2 boats with inboard engines over the past 44 years, a 25’ North Star and currently a J/30, 14 and 30 yrs, respectively).
Question is - during spring launching off a split-bed trailer, I need To back the boat up to exit the launching area in Mattapoisett, and I am wondering if the small 3.5hp motors that have only fwd and neutral can be swiveled 180 degrees to reverse the thrust direction of the motor. (I am hoping to keep weight down and avoid the 4hp & higher weights as well as fwd/rev that these have.). There is not enough room to spin the boat and leave the narrow launch area bow first.
(This question may seem trivial, but i’ve only owned an Atomic 4 and a Yanmar 2gm 15hp inboards over the past 44 years.)

2) What is the recommended configuration for installing knotmeter and speedo on a J/24? I think the ‘shoot-through’ depth transducer sounds good, but don’t know if there’s one already configured on the boat. Seems like a technically workable approach without drilling holes.
Also, for speed readings, what is the preferred method of adding a knotmeter (without cutting a hole in the hull for a thru-hull transducer)?

FYI - I still own the J/30 ‘Waltzing Matilda’ and will be downsizing and selling her to have just the new J/24 ...

Many thanks for any advice you can share!
 
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Thomas Anthony

New Member
I have a 1987 model and like it. Although just a general statement I find it useful to have the reverse function on the boat. In terms of O/B size I would say 4-6 hp works well depending on factors like is there current, is the motor used for cruising, etc. Mine came with a 6hp 2 stroke with F-N-R and I found it works great for what I am doing which ages ago included a 200 mile (mostly) power trip from Palm Beach, FL to Marathon.
With respect to speed mine had no through hulls so I added a Velocitek Speed puck just to stbd of companionway. It is velcroed in place and removed/put below when not in use. Time to install it was about a minute and has the added bonus of having electronic compass.
 

billveno83

New Member
Please indulge me a follow up to my previous question (1) above -
Is there sufficient room to rotate a 3.5hp fwd/neutral only (no reverse) outboard (say a Mercury) 180 degrees to power the boat in reverse?
Only needs to operate in this manner for about 100 yards to clear a launch area.
 

Thomas Anthony

New Member
Short answer is should be-yes. Longer answer is depending on several factors. Which motor bracket is on the boat? Most of the boats came from the factory with a racing bracket which is fixed and was made of welded aluminum from like a mast or boom section plus the Delrin portion the motor clamps to. Many boats though instead have the adjustable bracket typically made by Garelick and others which raises and lowers so that the distance from the bracket to the transom may be slightly different. Motors of different vintage (2 stroke vs 4 stroke, brand, etc.) may have slightly different cowl dimensions fore and aft (thinking of the typical racing scenario in the past where like a 3.3 2 stroke Tohatsu was removed for racing and placed under one of the quarter berths down below). I have had both brackets on mine, it came with the fixed one and I changed it to the adjustable one as I primarily use the boat for day sailing so don't need to remove the motor each time. What I don't recall and could be critical is if the rudder clears the prop in all possible scenarios. This became very relevant in a previous boat I owned, an S-2 7.9 when coming into the trailer on a very windy day and let's just say the decision making process was both accelerated and not the best the net result being that the rudder was left with a little bite mark that needed repair over that winter. As a general statement I think what you are trying to do should work and work fine, but the success will also depend on how windy the day is, how much current there is where you back, other obstacles, obstructions, etc as the boat in reverse whether 180 on the motor or with a reverse gear does not back up super well as the foils are now reversed, less control, etc. Sorry for such a long response but there are a few things to think about here.
 

billveno83

New Member
Thank you, Thomas and Luke! Much appreciate your remarks.
My boat, judging from photos I have (you may recall that I can’t see it in person until May), has a lifting bracket, so it probably has clearance for rotating a small 3.5hp ob with only fed/neutral 180 degrees.
The clearance for a 3 blade prop is another matter, but the process of backing up shouldn’t ideally involve moving the rudder a great deal side-to-side.
I will see about dimensions and clearances on a couple o GLNG shaft engines (mainly a 3.5hp Mercury).
Your contents are very helpful in my understanding of the mechanics here.
 

Luke Fricke

New Member
You should be good I rarely use mine I mainly sail out so I only use it to pull back into the slip if its blowing weird you will have no issues unless it's blowing like 30kts then you may be underpowered
 

Thomas Anthony

New Member
Happy to help! Upon further reflection and relying on memory (always a sketchy thing as I age-lol), I think you are fine with the prop issue. I do seem to remember when I bought the boat about 9 years ago making a quick check of the issue based on the 7.9 experience and from memory it was ok. You will like the boat am sure, in addition to the 7.9 have owned a C&C 33 and J 35 in the past and honestly they were all great boats including the 24. Bonus on the 24 is there were enough produced that there are many good things on the secondary market from a rudder cover I scored on eBay to lightly used sails.
 

Peddler

New Member
I have a 3.5hp tohatsu mounted on a lifting bracket. I spin it for reverse. No problems with clearance, but I hope you’re flexible. Good luck with it!
 

billveno83

New Member
Thank you for the feedback on your Tohatsu motor. I have no problem with turning the motor for reverse, and much prefer a lighter weight vs. a 4 hp or larger motor. Much appreciate your comments!
 

billveno83

New Member
Another newbie question to help me outfit my (old) new J/24 ... what are the generally preferred Genoa blocks for the 1” cockpit tracks? The boat I purchased has blocks only on the cabin top, and they do not have ‘stand up’ springs.

Photos of cabin top blocks on most boats seem to be Schaefer blocks on cars that have white plastic (?) sheaves. I have lower profile Merriman double sheet #1 Genoa blocks on my J/30, which are great. Weight doesn’t bother me, but they are pricey. Any recommendations? I will not likely be racing one design ...
 

Thomas Anthony

New Member
I have the Schaefer blocks on mine and like them. They are the white sheave that you mention and I find them suitable for my use which consists of day sailing, occasional racing and cruising. Schaefer in general builds pretty robust hardware and it is not like blocks are "consumables" i.e. wax, bottom paint, etc, so the good news is it should be a one and done purchase.
 

billveno83

New Member
Thank you Thomas! That’s very helpful.
I sort of expected Harken would have a Genoa block
& car product, but they don’t seem to. I can buy a couple of used Schaefer blocks that will do me fine and for lots less $$.
Many thanks!
 

Thomas Anthony

New Member
No worries, happy to help! I think among the more competitive racer crowd they sometimes use "Lopez Blocks" which are by appearance a Harken block that is mated to a T track car, but I think for what you are doing the Schaefer will do just fine as long as not left out in the sun year round in a place like Florida for decades. Even then the sheaves can typically be drilled out and replaced for not a ton of money. Hopefully spring will not be too late this year and you can get out and enjoy the boat.
"
 

billveno83

New Member
Thank you, Tom. I would venture a guess that your last sentence applies to all of us. May we all get out on the water soon!
 

billveno83

New Member
Does anyone have a recommendation for someone who makes mainsail covers for a reasonable price? I am looking for one for a rope luff, flaked main - the rectangular type that doesn’t go around the mast. (Or a referral to someone who’s got one used in decent shape.). Thanks!
 

Thomas Anthony

New Member
Your local sailmaker should be able to do a good job and you can pick the Sunbrella fabric color you like. Alternatively in the pre Covid world, the two large one design lofts, i.e. North Sales Newport, RI or Quantum loft in Portsmouth, RI actually did enough volume that they had them pre made/could ship instantly. Given how Covid has changed the supply chain in all sort of ways, that may no longer be true. From memory about 300ish, might be a little more.
 

billveno83

New Member
Yet another question from the ‘newbie’ to J/24 sailing:
The 1986 J/24 I purchased (and have not yet seen in person) has a roller furler, and I was wondering if anyone has any advice, cautions, or other comments that would be useful to me. I plan to do some local PHRF racing, but not one design.
I was enthused about being able to sail her shorthanded, but suspect that there are some trade offs.
(I only sailed my J/30 alone using either the Genoa or main, and am hopeful of a little more time on the water in this ‘new’ boat.)
Thanks!
 

Thomas Anthony

New Member
Some random thoughts on furling. It is a great help in sailing shorthanded although like anything else in life does involve a few compromises. In heavy air with full crew the idea sail would be a sturdy, flat, #3. In light air you want a light #1/150. Obviously with furling you are trying to make one sail do a lot, so there will be some compromises. One might be size (perhaps use a 140% for size) and the other will be going for a material that is on the heavy/more robust side of what a #1 would like. As an fyi I day sail mine with myself and my better half, as and a result don't have the weight on the rail that the boat is designed for. It is a little on the tippy side to begin with so I actually had a #4 jib made for the boat and like it/use it quite a bit. For PHRF it really depends on few things. Will you be racing in the jib and main class or do you hope to race in the spin class. The level of seriousness of your local PHRF group will probably in turn have an impact on your results, i.e if it is a pretty hard core group that takes it more seriously, replaces sails frequently/sails smart, etc it might be harder to do well than in a more casual group. Depending on PHRF area, there may be a rating credit for using the roller furling (typically like 3-6 seconds.) Good luck and enjoy!
 

billveno83

New Member
Looking for more stuff - would like two sets of stanchions (for both upper and lower lifelines) and bases. Also am looking for a mainsail cover in decent shape.
Thanks!
 
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