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Traveler line ideas

powergroove

Member
every line so far has slipped. The cleat doesnt look so bad, what is the preferred line that you guys like. Secondly, does anyone play with this line, or is it kept tight?

Thanks again!
 

49208

Tentmaker
Get some vice grips and squeeze the cleat closed some more. It will then hold the line. Lines range from 12 strand to double braid, they all do the job. (Search the threads here, we've covered it before)

It's either eased just so the block doesn't hang up on the tiller when tacking in light air or really right for all other conditions for full rigs..
 

GeoffS

Member
I believe most people rig the traveler so that when it's released from the cleat the block just clears the tiller (so the knot is very far back along the deck). This also gives you the maximum purchase when you pull the traveler tight, and has the additional side-effect that if the line slips out of the cleat it can't go very far.

I use a 12-strand single-braid vectran (or something like that) for mine. Around 3/16" (likely a metric size), I think. This is one of the mostly highly loaded lines on the boat, and you don't want it to stretch (or else you can't get the boom down as low as possible).

Cheers,

Geoff S.
 

fracisco

New Member
I use T900 or Crystalyne, which is a Vectran core with a fine, braided cover. It holds in the cleat well and is stiff.

I tried 12-strand Spectra and was very unhappy with its stretch.
 

Clive Humphris

ILCA Technical
Its also a good idea to reduce the fore aft depth of the triangle. This reduces the load required at the cleat to achieve a given tension in the traveler portion. I use a height of triangle somewhere between 100 to 150mm. I use either 3.5 or 6mm Excel D12 with no slippage problems..
 

Merrily

Administrator
Its also a good idea to reduce the fore aft depth of the triangle. This reduces the load required at the cleat to achieve a given tension in the traveler portion. I use a height of triangle somewhere between 100 to 150mm. I use either 3.5 or 6mm Excel D12 with no slippage problems..
Thanks, Clive. That's a new one for me.
 

jimmy

New Member
Clive said the same thing Goeffs already had, just slightly different wording.

Trying to give credit where credit is due.

I use spectra and spliced the line rather than using a knot. Spectra splices are easy and it is much easier to make the triangle the desired size with a splice. I have never had a problem with my line sliping in the cleat. I went with good sized line (sorry don't recall the actual diameter). I saw no advantage to a smaller line for the traveler. The traveler blocks are really quite large so the block runs nicely over the larger line.

Jimmy
 

gouvernail

Super Opinionated and Always Correct
if the cleat is an old metal cleat 1/4 inch Sampson Spectron 12 or Yale Vectrus will usually hold fine and last a long time.

If you have the newer Clam Cleats labeled with a vanguard logo, 3/16 will work.
 

Clive Humphris

ILCA Technical
I also use a splice in the traveller - its just a lot neater and lower profile. My reading of the rules is that all control lines are allowed splices - the traveller is defined as a control line. See Rules, Part 2, 3ai and 3bii.

Jimmy, Having re-read GeoffS's comment you are right. It obviously didn't click with me first time.

Sorry GeoffS if I stole some of your thunder!
 

Clive Humphris

ILCA Technical
OK, 49208, we are talking about the first loop that is formed in the traveler line. That is either done with a bowline or a splice. The other end is passed first thru one traveler fairlead, thru the traveler block, thru the other fairlead, then back thru the bowline loop, secured with a single hitch then thru the cleat and the end is tidied up with a bowline loop handle. I hope that is clear.
 

49208

Tentmaker
And on the basis that a picture is worth a thousand words:-

View attachment 1643
Thanks - IMHO that doesn't accomplish much more then tieing the bowline closer to the trav fairlead (getting the bulk of the bowline knot away from the tiller. You still have the single hitch right thru the loop in either method. By using the bowline, it's easier to change the wear spots on the line from the fairleads too.

I was hoping you had worked out a splice that eliminated the bowline and the single hitch - I tried splicing it a number of different ways to do this, but they all slipped unless you straight stitched the buried tail of the splice. (Which had to be done by hand - PIA)
 

jimmy

New Member
That picture is not how I did it. The loop of my splice is large and goes through the two fairleads and the traveler block. I will see if I can't do something in MS paint and post a sketch.

Jimmy
 

jimmy

New Member
Kind of quick and dirty, but maybe it will help. The loop of my splice is the triangle section. The thicker line represents the bury for the splice. To splice spectra you simply insert the entire tail through the line at the desired spot and then a short distance 1/4 inch or so away you insert the tail into the line (bury). The longer the tail the stronger the spice.

I think it is class legal. as I understand the rules you are allowed one knot or splice. I chose splice.

Jimmy
 

Attachments

Clive Humphris

ILCA Technical
That looks good Jimmy. Did you apply a whipping at the 3 way joint. I would believe it would be a point of weakness without.
 

49208

Tentmaker
Jimmy's splice is the one I played with, and at least with the 12 strand I was using, you needed to whip the 3 way and stitch down the end of the buried tail in order to keep the tail tucked... I never had time to sail with in a good blow to see if it would hold...
 

jimmy

New Member
I did whip the three way joint. The tail is burried over a foot. I raced all summer with no problems. I'm in SoCal though, so I never saw that much wind.

Jimmy
 

swisssailor

New Member
Hi all,
My problem is that when going upwind, the traveler block won't stay in the corner. I use core dyneema for the traveler, and it's as tight as possible. Should I change it to Vectran line or something else? Dyneema should normally work as it doesn't stretch..

Thanks for your help
 

663

Member
"Dyneema should normally work as it doesn't stretch"

I've been happy with Vectran. Dyneema has a tremendous amount of creap.
 

Clive Humphris

ILCA Technical
swisssailor, the other important factors for this are whether you have a low tiller and that some vang tension is required in most conditions.
 

powergroove

Member
Hi all,
My problem is that when going upwind, the traveler block won't stay in the corner. I use core dyneema for the traveler, and it's as tight as possible. Should I change it to Vectran line or something else? Dyneema should normally work as it doesn't stretch..

Thanks for your help
Is that a problem? Seems to me, if I am reading this right, that the traveler is more centered upwind...wouldnt that be a good thing? That is if it is still close to the deck and not block to blocked.
 

gouvernail

Super Opinionated and Always Correct
Nope. All the way to the side is fastest .
It has to do with driving the boat ahead instead of aside.

The sail has a shape. The shape drives the boat woith the sail pointed at the best angle to the wind. Bringing the boom inboard does not change the angle of attack in a good way because the sail is not cut to point that high.

In fact...as the wind picks up. ypou will see all teh speedy guys puling their tack grommets down and down and down. This opens the leech and drives the boat foreword rahter than sideways...and makes it easir to keep the boat flat...so you can spend your energy thinking rather than straining against the sail.
 
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