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Time to get my Super Sailfish MKII on the lake!

merlinito

New Member
Hello fellow sailors. I grew up sailing Sunfish & Sailfish boats in NW New Jersey from the time I could swim the boat home. I purchased this Sailfish in 2013 for a steal, sadly between this picture and purchase the previous owner left the boat with rigging up for three weeks on the side of a local highway so the sail is a little worse for wear than this pic. That owner never put it in the water so I don't know whether or not she takes on any water.

I got it home by buying racks for my Honda Accord, here's my list of questions --please add steps I haven't of :)

1) How do I leak test the seams? I don't have a good place to dry it out if it takes on water after launch.
2) What small repairs are worth doing? I plan on restoring the wood parts, buying new screws for hardware attachments and repairing the tears in the sail
3) What is the least expensive option for a trailer that I can pull with my '05 accord? or is it better to just put it back up on the roof for launch? I think I have a place to tie up for the season at our local reservoir.

7 years an owner, at least 14 since this boat has been wet, it's past time to get her in the water! Thanks pandemic.
 

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signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
1) How do I leak test the seams?
Blow low pressure low volume air into the drain hole, spray soap and Dawn all over the seams, daggerboard trunk etc...

Search Air Leak Test on our youtube page


2) What small repairs are worth doing? I plan on restoring the wood parts, buying new screws for hardware attachments and repairing the tears in the sail
SailRite sells adhesive backed sailcloth for sail repair

3) What is the least expensive option for a trailer that I can pull with my '05 accord? or is it better to just put it back up on the roof for launch? I think I have a place to tie up for the season at our local reservoir.
We like trailers. And we don't like to lift above our waist. Your hull is at least 100 pounds and long, it's going to want to sway going down the road. Least expensive option is a small utility trailer from Lowes, 8 footer, the ramp comes off easy. Put padded 2x4s crosswise to support the boat deck side down, and you can carry your other expedition gear in it like coolers, bikes, chairs, another boat.
You might find a "double jet ski" trailer for cheap, by double I mean it has to be for the longer jet ski. You need at least 7 feet from bow stop/winch to the trailer axle for weight and balance. The trailer will be a bit heavier, 100 pounds or so than the regular jet ski trailer and with that little extra weight it rides nice, even when empty.

PS the Sailfish also makes a very stable SUP or kayak, and carries 400 pounds. See our article in Small Boats Magazine.

And congratulations on your new boat! Did you name her yet?
 

Seaotter5

New Member
I have been looking at a couple of Super Sailfish mk2 that are relatively close by, and which look like they are in good shape, one $300, the other $400. They would rude more easily on my kayak trailer than a Sunfish, and it looks like it might be faster in light winds than the Sunfish, as well. My main question is how do you manage to sail it without killing your back? I am 63, and I'm not up to doing 100 sit ups a day!
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Skipper says to start off slow. Go out on a light wind day and just go out for 1-2 tacks, 10-20 minutes. Set the boom higher at what we call the Geezer Rig, gooseneck about 22-24 inches back and the halyard rigged so that the boom has a slight rise aft as it runs to the stern. With the boom set that high it is pretty easy to duck under the boom. I sail pretty flat and sit Indian style a lot of the time. The other option is to lean back while the boom crosses.

Best way to save the back is to work on engaging the core, kind of like a crunch, and a snug fit PFD will help in ways similar to a back brace. Start with 2 sit ups or crunches a day and work up to 100 :)

I am 5' 8" and this is the boom clearance I like.

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A Super Sailfish makes a nice sit on top kayak, add a low slung beach chair for longer trips, tied to the hand rails.

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SUP mode, very stable. 400 pound capacity. You get some workout loading and unloading 98 pounds of boat, dollies are great if you have to move the boat any distance.

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Skipper paddled out, dropped the rudder, dropped in the daggerboard, raised the sail and sailed around a bit. Capsized, got righted, sailed some more, dropped the sail and even took down the boom, paddled back in.

Audrey Sweetness SUP.jpg

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Another gent added outriggers and takes his dogs out with him. Big dogs.
 
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