The Importance of a Leak Test

Thread starter #1
The Importance of a Leak Test
This Scorpion (Sunfish clone) looks great and shows no evidence of damage, but after a leak test (I used an air compressor designed for blowing up an inflatable mattress) I found six areas- all under the aluminum trim- that were bubblin’ away. I guess the good news is the daggerboard trunk and mast step are air tight! I will drill out all the rivets, remove the trim and put in for a new order of Flexpoxy. 685A0CA1-F81E-42F3-9311-02EAA89CBDC5.jpeg
 
#2
The Importance of a Leak Test
This Scorpion (Sunfish clone) looks great and shows no evidence of damage, but after a leak test (I used an air compressor designed for blowing up an inflatable mattress) I found six areas- all under the aluminum trim- that were bubblin’ away. I guess the good news is the daggerboard trunk and mast step are air tight! I will drill out all the rivets, remove the trim and put in for a new order of Flexpoxy. View attachment 26816
After repairing my mast step and daggerboard trunk a few days ago, I am planning on leak testing mine this weekend to see if there are any other leaks. I am hoping not to have to remove the aluminum trim, how common is it for them to leak at that seam?
 
Thread starter #3
I’m more familiar with Sunfish, but the design is the same. It’s not an uncommon area for leaks, unfortunately. The fix isn’t too involved, but hopefully your leak test will show that you don’t need to remove the trim. Use the drain on the starboard side and keep the air flow ‘loose’ while you work your way around with a spray bottle of soapy water.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#4
It is very common for them to leak at the seam, that is what bashes into other things like docks or when the boat is dropped on its side. It is easy to remove the trim and then rivet it back on.

Common repairs

Cheers
Kent and Audrey
 
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