Starting: shooting up to defend hole

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#21
You would need to look at the case histories and not the rule book.

If in the manoeuvre you start moving backwards, rather than being a starboard tack boat going backwards, you could be considered a port tack boat going downwind with an extremely blunt bow.
The "backing rule", RRS 22.3, says, "A boat moving astern, or sideways to windward, through the water by backing a sail shall keep clear of one that is not." It's not a prohibited action like sculling. (And it doesn't matter on which tack you are, or were.)

Which specific case(s) are you referring to? I don't see there are any that deal with this rule in the Case Book.

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#22
I still can't find a rule outside of which backing would be illegal.

Maybe rule 22.3... a boat moving astern...by backing a sail shall keep clear...

(Slingsby at the London Olympics in last race???)
 
#24
Shooting up to near head to wind (or even just past it) for a couple of seconds with your shoulder against the boom to subtly back the sail, while sculling madly to return to a close hauled starboard course, is an excellent way to move the boat sideways quickly towards the windward boat. Opens up a lovely gap to leeward with 20 or 30 seconds to go.

Effectively you've tacked onto port though so it's illegal, as the sculling is into the wind rather than away from it. The judges are mostly on to the trick now but it took them a couple of years to wake up. Done well though it's still quite hard to notice unless the jury is watching you closely. And the top guys do do it very well and always know when the jury is watching them...
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#25
"Scull 3
Sculling to offset steering of the boat caused by backing a sail is prohibited."


Ok, thanks. Not always easy to find what you want on the WS website.

So the bottom line is that backing the sail isn't illegal, but it's an easy-to-spot sign that you may be sculling illegally at the same time.

(And as I already indicated many posts ago, I really wouldn't want to be a judge at a big-fleet Laser start.)

_
 

AlanD

Former ISAF Laser Measurer
#26
The "backing rule", RRS 22.3, says, "A boat moving astern, or sideways to windward, through the water by backing a sail shall keep clear of one that is not." It's not a prohibited action like sculling. (And it doesn't matter on which tack you are, or were.)

Which specific case(s) are you referring to? I don't see there are any that deal with this rule in the Case Book.

_
The "backing rule", RRS 22.3, says, "A boat moving astern, or sideways to windward, through the water by backing a sail shall keep clear of one that is not." It's not a prohibited action like sculling. (And it doesn't matter on which tack you are, or were.)

Which specific case(s) are you referring to? I don't see there are any that deal with this rule in the Case Book.

_
My bad. To distracted by life at the moment,
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
#27
Some of these rules are quite subtle (and open to interpretation); do the sailors get briefed prior to the regatta as to what the judges will be looking for?
I once participated in a Sunfish Worlds and remember such a session the evening before.
 

thieuster

Active Member
#28
No. Perhaps relayed by the coaches when they pick it up at the coach meetings. Normally, during a large event, this is never on the table. Sometimes there's some uproar from the coaches the morning after a day when something odd has happened. As we witnessed during a Europa Cup regatta last year when a jury boat followed one single sailor for more than 10 mins. (Followed as in 20 m behind him, following his course). Even coaches from other teams/countries commented on that jury-move.

On the other side of the spectrum: the 2018 UK Open. Where the committee and the jury organised workshops every day. The evening session about 'rule 42' was well attended. I guess by nearly all sailors. (BTW, looking back on 2018, we rated the UK Open as the best event we've attended last year!)
 
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